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1.
Risks ; 10(11), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2123803

ABSTRACT

Fintech allows investors to explore previously unavailable investment opportunities;it provides new return opportunities while also introducing new risks. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between risk and return in the fintech industry in the Indian stock market. This article is based on market-based research that focuses on demonstrating the volatility in the fintech market's prices and demystifying the opportunities. Secondary data were collected from the Bombay Stock Exchange's official fintech industry website from January 2017 to July 2022 to determine whether there is any dynamic link between risk and return in the Indian fintech market. The variance-based Mean-GARCH (GARCH-M) model was used to determine whether there is a dynamic link between risk and return in the Indian fintech market. The findings emphasize the importance of taking the risk of investing in India's fintech industry. The implications for stock investors' and fund managers' portfolio composition and holding periods of equities or market exposure are significant. Finally, depending on their investment horizons, the Indian fintech industry may yield significant profits for risk-taking individuals.

2.
Thorax ; 77(Suppl 1):A70-A71, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2118256

ABSTRACT

IntroductionThe incidence of parapneumonic effusions (PPE) in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is 20–57%, of which 5–10% develop into pleural infection. The role of early identification of PPE by thoracic ultrasound (TUS) and other presenting features in prediction of subsequent pleural infection is not clear. We explored the use of TUS in the front-door assessment of patients with CAP, particularly if this aided earlier identification of pleural infection.MethodsConsecutive patients admitted with CAP underwent TUS within 24 hours of admission. Appropriate sampling was performed in patients with effusions >2 cm depth. Final outcome including any subsequent development/worsening of effusion was recorded. CAP was defined as an ‘acute respiratory febrile illness with new consolidation on Chest X-Ray (CXR) or CT scan and not attributed to COVID-19’.ResultsOver a 4-week period, 39 patients with CAP were admitted, age range 40 to 90, median 74. 25/39 (64%) had a detectable pleural effusion on TUS, of which 19 (48.7%) had no visible effusion on the corresponding CXR. Most of these effusions were not amenable to sampling. Of the 6/39 (15.3%) patients who had a visible effusion on CXR, 3 were sampled, 1 of which was proven to be pleural infection. 2 patients that had a detectable effusion on TUS but not on CXR at admission subsequently developed an effusion visible on CXR. Of these, 1 patient was very unwell and died prior to sampling of pleural fluid whilst the other was discharged home without sampling.ConclusionsThe incidence of PPEs may be higher than previously estimated from previous cohorts where TUS was not used in routine assessment. The characteristics of this cohort which are associated with either resolution or development of pleural infection are not understood and warrant further evaluation. Our data from this small pilot evaluation did not identify any particular TUS features that predict development of pleural infection. A detailed prospective evaluation of the use of TUS in patients with pneumonia to further characterise the natural history of PPEs is required.

3.
Gastroenterology ; 160(6):S-777, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1598712

ABSTRACT

Background The incidence and severity of COVID-19 among liver transplant (LT) recipients is not clearly elucidated in the current literature. Liver transplant recipients are often on immunosuppression regimens which can increase their risk of developing more severe infections. Current studies in literature report mortality rates in hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients ranging from 0% in small cohort in San Francisco to 20.5% in a large multi-center cohort in New York City. Our study aims to identify the incidence and mortality of COVID-19 infections in a large population of liver transplant recipients. Methods In a large integrated healthcare system in Southern California with a population of 4.7 million active members, data was extracted from the electronic health records (EHR) between March 2020 to November 2020. ICD 10 codes were used to identify patients who were persons under investigation (PUI) and who were confirmed to have COVID-19. PUIs were defined as those suspected, screened, or exposed to other COVID-19 patients. Data was joined with laboratory data to identify it the COVID-19 tests were performed. Diagnoses for PUI and confirmed cases were also pulled from patient notes using text analysis and problem lists. Demographic data was extracted from the EHR. Results We identified 1,253 active members who had received a LT as of 12/1/2020. Of these LT recipients, 86% (1,081/1,253) were more than 1-year post-transplant. In the post-LT cohort, 112 (8.9%) were at one point considered persons under investigation (PUI) and 31 (2.5%) were confirmed to have COVID-19. The incidence of confirmed COVID-19 in the overall population within the integrated healthcare system was 3.2%. Of the 31 post-LT patients with confirmed COVID-19, 54.8% (17/31) were male, 45.2% (14/31) were age 45-64, and 51.6% (16/31) were age 65 or older. The predominant ethnicity was Hispanic 67.7% (21/31) followed by White 22.6% (7/31), multiracial 6.5% (2/31), and Black 3.2% (1/31). The overall mortality in this cohort was 6.5% (2/31). Both deaths were in patients age 65-74 and occurred early in the pandemic in the months of April and May of 2020. As shown in Table 1, from the months of June to November of 2020, there were zero deaths from COVID-19 in this cohort. Conclusions The incidence of COVID-19 in a large cohort of post-LT patients (2.5%) in Southern California is lower than in the overall general population (3.2%). The mortality rate in postLT patients confirmed to have COVID-19 was 6.5%. Furthermore, the mortality rate appears to be declining over time. In our post-LT cohort, the most affected ethnicity was Hispanic, and mortality occurred in older age groups—reflecting known trends in the general population. (Table presented.)

4.
International Journal of Information and Education Technology ; 11(11):504-509, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1464126

ABSTRACT

—The laboratory work holds a great importance for an undergraduate student of science. And during COVID-19 pandemic, when the theory classes were moved online, migrating practical classes to online mode turned out to be a challenging task. This article aims to study the use of mathematical programs as an extensive methodological approach to enhance the learning of electronic circuit designing at undergraduate level. The students were given a task of designing a well-known oscillator circuit using a mathematical program written in open source application Scilab. The values of all the components needed to design an oscillator were calculated. The circuit was then designed practically for various frequencies using the theoretically obtained component values. The obtained output frequency of oscillator circuit was within 5% variation to the theoretically obtained one. In this article, the authors captured the experience of 500 undergraduate science students studying at various colleges of University of Delhi, India via a valid online questionnaire circulated through different platforms. The response of the students was gauged and it could be inferred that mathematical programs are working as a decent replacement during these demanding times and can be used as an add-on, once the physical labs start operating back to normalcy. © 2021 by the authors.

5.
Gastroenterology ; 160(6):S777-S777, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1250791
6.
Acta Medica International ; 7(2):143-147, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1024705

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In this paper, we consider a fundamental problem of testing faced by the health staff on testing COVID 19 patients. In general, the number of testing kits or testing capabilities is limited, and the number of COVID 19 patients is much larger than that. This paper tries to answer this fundamental question that how to perform COVID 19 testing to reduce the death rate. Materials and Methods: We consider that the survival rate of patients is dependent over two parameters: their age and severity of symptoms at a time. Based on these observations, we propose a survival rate function. Using the survival rates, the death rate for an individual is obtained. MATLAB was used for plotting the graphs. Results: It is shown by numerical results that by using the proposed mechanism, the average death rate can be significantly reduced. Conclusion: It is proposed to conduct the testing for those patients who lie in the high death rate regimen.

7.
Med Hypotheses ; 144: 110133, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670653

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an overwhelming pandemic which has shattered the whole world. Lung injury being the main clinical manifestation, it is likely to cause COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and ARDS (acute respiratory distress syndrome). The possible cause behind this might be redox imbalance due to viral infection. Elevation in Glutathione (GSH) levels by administration of its promolecule might be effective. N-acetylcysteine is one such drug with potency to scavenge Reactive Oxygen Species, least side effects, and an effective precursor of glutathione. Consequently we hypothesize that N-acetylcysteine along with the conventional treatment may be treated as a potential therapeutic solution in cases of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Acetylcysteine/therapeutic use , Glutathione/metabolism , Acetylcysteine/chemistry , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , Humans , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
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