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1.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(10):4393-4400, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2033480

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has affected the worldwidefinancial system2 and the strict lockdown have changed the whole scenario of the daily live as well as the banking sector. In the modern scenario, utilization of Internet has revolutionized the whole banking system. Customers can bank anytime, anywhere without visiting to the bank. Internet banking helps customers in saving time by completing work at the click of the button. This fast service was more useful when covid-19 pandemic was happen and our society was locked in their room.Although, Internet banking is very convenient and fast, but there are several security issues are arises time to time from customers. Banking establishments have taken numerous measures to make certainprotection measures for his or herclientswhilstappearingdiverse transactions onlinebut fraud is happen.

2.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-334727

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Gamma variant spread rapidly across Brazil, causing substantial infection and death waves. We use individual-level patient records following hospitalisation with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to document the extensive shocks in hospital fatality rates that followed Gamma's spread across 14 state capitals, and in which more than half of hospitalised patients died over sustained time periods. We show that extensive fluctuations in COVID-19 in-hospital fatality rates also existed prior to Gamma's detection, and were largely transient after Gamma's detection, subsiding with hospital demand. Using a Bayesian fatality rate model, we find that the geographic and temporal fluctuations in Brazil's COVID-19 in-hospital fatality rates are primarily associated with geographic inequities and shortages in healthcare capacity. We project that approximately half of Brazil's COVID-19 deaths in hospitals could have been avoided without pre-pandemic geographic inequities and without pandemic healthcare pressure. Our results suggest that investments in healthcare resources, healthcare optimization, and pandemic preparedness are critical to minimize population wide mortality and morbidity caused by highly transmissible and deadly pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2, especially in low- and middle-income countries. NOTE: The following manuscript has appeared as 'Report 46 - Factors driving extensive spatial and temporal fluctuations in COVID-19 fatality rates in Brazilian hospitals' at https://spiral.imperial.ac.uk:8443/handle/10044/1/91875 . ONE SENTENCE SUMMARY: COVID-19 in-hospital fatality rates fluctuate dramatically in Brazil, and these fluctuations are primarily associated with geographic inequities and shortages in healthcare capacity.

3.
Environmental Resilience and Transformation in times of COVID-19: Climate Change Effects on Environmental Functionality ; : 311-322, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1783105

ABSTRACT

Climate change is an existential challenge and its impacts are projected to increase in coming times. Adaptation becomes even more imperative more climate vulnerable developing countries. Literature establishes that climate change impacts women differently due to socio-economic factors such as rights, cultural norms, etc. and other intersectional demographic characteristics such as age and location. The COVID-19 pandemic has also differentially impacted women and girls. In the context of climate change, this chapter reviews, analyses and documents gender disproportional impacts due to climate change and how it has exacerbated in times of COVID-19 pandemic. This chapter presents the state of art of gender considerations in international climate agenda, and India’s national policies, projects and local initiatives. Using the primary information from four states of Tamil Nadu, Telangana, Himachal Pradesh, and Punjab who are implementing gender concerns in climate change, this work provides useful approaches and insights into climate change planning through real case examples. While highlighting the importance of three-step approach to gender differentiated risk assessment, gender analysis and gender strategy, it discusses of implementing such approaches into capacity development for implementation of climate adaptation activities and in revision of current states’ action plans on climate change, which gains greater focus for any long term recovery that takes sustainability concerns into account. © 2021 Elsevier Inc.

4.
Science ; 372(6544):815-821, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1735994

ABSTRACT

Cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in Manaus, Brazil, resurged in late 2020 despite previously high levels of infection. Genome sequencing of viruses sampled in Manaus between November 2020 and January 2021 revealed the emergence and circulation of a novel SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern. Lineage P.1 acquired 17 mutations, including a trio in the spike protein (K417T, E484K, and N501Y) associated with increased binding to the human ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2) receptor. Molecular clock analysis shows that P.1 emergence occurred around mid-November 2020 and was preceded by a period of faster molecular evolution. Using a two-category dynamical model that integrates genomic and mortality data, we estimate that P.1 may be 1.7- to 2.4-fold more transmissible and that previous (non-P.1) infection provides 54 to 79% of the protection against infection with P.1 that it provides against non-P.1 lineages. Enhanced global genomic surveillance of variants of concern, which may exhibit increased transmissibility and/or immune evasion, is critical to accelerate pandemic responsiveness.

5.
McCrone, J. T.; Hill, V.; Bajaj, S.; Pena, R. E.; Lambert, B. C.; Inward, R.; Bhatt, S.; Volz, E.; Ruis, C.; Dellicour, S.; Baele, G.; Zarebski, A. E.; Sadilek, A.; Wu, N.; Schneider, A.; Ji, X.; Raghwani, J.; Jackson, B.; Colquhoun, R.; O'Toole, Á, Peacock, T. P.; Twohig, K.; Thelwall, S.; Dabrera, G.; Myers, R.; Faria, N. R.; Huber, C.; Bogoch, I. I.; Khan, K.; du Plessis, L.; Barrett, J. C.; Aanensen, D. M.; Barclay, W. S.; Chand, M.; Connor, T.; Loman, N. J.; Suchard, M. A.; Pybus, O. G.; Rambaut, A.; Kraemer, M. U. G.; Robson, S. C.; Connor, T. R.; Loman, N. J.; Golubchik, T.; Martinez Nunez, R. T.; Bonsall, D.; Rambaut, A.; Snell, L. B.; Livett, R.; Ludden, C.; Corden, S.; Nastouli, E.; Nebbia, G.; Johnston, I.; Lythgoe, K.; Estee Torok, M.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Prieto, J. A.; Saeed, K.; Jackson, D. K.; Houlihan, C.; Frampton, D.; Hamilton, W. L.; Witney, A. A.; Bucca, G.; Pope, C. F.; Moore, C.; Thomson, E. C.; Harrison, E. M.; Smith, C. P.; Rogan, F.; Beckwith, S. M.; Murray, A.; Singleton, D.; Eastick, K.; Sheridan, L. A.; Randell, P.; Jackson, L. M.; Ariani, C. V.; Gonçalves, S.; Fairley, D. J.; Loose, M. W.; Watkins, J.; Moses, S.; Nicholls, S.; Bull, M.; Amato, R.; Smith, D. L.; Aanensen, D. M.; Barrett, J. C.; Aggarwal, D.; Shepherd, J. G.; Curran, M. D.; Parmar, S.; Parker, M. D.; Williams, C.; Glaysher, S.; Underwood, A. P.; Bashton, M.; Pacchiarini, N.; Loveson, K. F.; Byott, M.; Carabelli, A. M.; Templeton, K. E.; de Silva, T. I.; Wang, D.; Langford, C. F.; Sillitoe, J.; Gunson, R. N.; Cottrell, S.; O'Grady, J.; Kwiatkowski, D.; Lillie, P. J.; Cortes, N.; Moore, N.; Thomas, C.; Burns, P. J.; Mahungu, T. W.; Liggett, S.; Beckett, A. H.; Holden, M. T. G.; Levett, L. J.; Osman, H.; Hassan-Ibrahim, M. O.; Simpson, D. A.; Chand, M.; Gupta, R. K.; Darby, A. C.; Paterson, S.; Pybus, O. G.; Volz, E. M.; de Angelis, D.; Robertson, D. L.; Page, A. J.; Martincorena, I.; Aigrain, L.; Bassett, A. R.; Wong, N.; Taha, Y.; Erkiert, M. J.; Spencer Chapman, M. H.; Dewar, R.; McHugh, M. P.; Mookerjee, S.; Aplin, S.; Harvey, M.; Sass, T.; Umpleby, H.; Wheeler, H.; McKenna, J. P.; Warne, B.; Taylor, J. F.; Chaudhry, Y.; Izuagbe, R.; Jahun, A. S.; Young, G. R.; McMurray, C.; McCann, C. M.; Nelson, A.; Elliott, S.; Lowe, H.; Price, A.; Crown, M. R.; Rey, S.; Roy, S.; Temperton, B.; Shaaban, S.; Hesketh, A. R.; Laing, K. G.; Monahan, I. M.; Heaney, J.; Pelosi, E.; Silviera, S.; Wilson-Davies, E.; Fryer, H.; Adams, H.; du Plessis, L.; Johnson, R.; Harvey, W. T.; Hughes, J.; Orton, R. J.; Spurgin, L. G.; Bourgeois, Y.; Ruis, C.; O'Toole, Á, Gourtovaia, M.; Sanderson, T.; Fraser, C.; Edgeworth, J.; Breuer, J.; Michell, S. L.; Todd, J. A.; John, M.; Buck, D.; Gajee, K.; Kay, G. L.; Peacock, S. J.; Heyburn, D.; Kitchman, K.; McNally, A.; Pritchard, D. T.; Dervisevic, S.; Muir, P.; Robinson, E.; Vipond, B. B.; Ramadan, N. A.; Jeanes, C.; Weldon, D.; Catalan, J.; Jones, N.; da Silva Filipe, A.; Williams, C.; Fuchs, M.; Miskelly, J.; Jeffries, A. R.; Oliver, K.; Park, N. R.; Ash, A.; Koshy, C.; Barrow, M.; Buchan, S. L.; Mantzouratou, A.; Clark, G.; Holmes, C. W.; Campbell, S.; Davis, T.; Tan, N. K.; Brown, J. R.; Harris, K. A.; Kidd, S. P.; Grant, P. R.; Xu-McCrae, L.; Cox, A.; Madona, P.; Pond, M.; Randell, P. A.; Withell, K. T.; Williams, C.; Graham, C.; Denton-Smith, R.; Swindells, E.; Turnbull, R.; Sloan, T. J.; Bosworth, A.; Hutchings, S.; Pymont, H. M.; Casey, A.; Ratcliffe, L.; Jones, C. R.; Knight, B. A.; Haque, T.; Hart, J.; Irish-Tavares, D.; Witele, E.; Mower, C.; Watson, L. K.; Collins, J.; Eltringham, G.; Crudgington, D.; Macklin, B.; Iturriza-Gomara, M.; Lucaci, A. O.; McClure, P. C.; Carlile, M.; Holmes, N.; Moore, C.; Storey, N.; Rooke, S.; Yebra, G.; Craine, N.; Perry, M.; Alikhan, N. F.; Bridgett, S.; Cook, K. F.; Fearn, C.; Goudarzi, S.; Lyons, R. A.; Williams, T.; Haldenby, S. T.; Durham, J.; Leonard, S.; Davies, R. M.; Batra, R.; Blane, B.; Spyer, M. J.; Smith, P.; Yavus, M.; Williams, R. J.; Mahanama, A. I. K.; Samaraweera, B.; Girgis, S. T.; Hansford, S. E.; Green, A.; Beaver, C.; Bellis, K. L.; Dorman, M. J.; Kay, S.; Prestwood, L.; Rajatileka, S.; Quick, J.; Poplawski, R.; Reynolds, N.; Mack, A.; Morriss, A.; Whalley, T.; Patel, B.; Georgana, I.; Hosmillo, M.; Pinckert, M. L.; Stockton, J.; Henderson, J. H.; Hollis, A.; Stanley, W.; Yew, W. C.; Myers, R.; Thornton, A.; Adams, A.; Annett, T.; Asad, H.; Birchley, A.; Coombes, J.; Evans, J. M.; Fina, L.; Gatica-Wilcox, B.; Gilbert, L.; Graham, L.; Hey, J.; Hilvers, E.; Jones, S.; Jones, H.; Kumziene-Summerhayes, S.; McKerr, C.; Powell, J.; Pugh, G.; Taylor, S.; Trotter, A. J.; Williams, C. A.; Kermack, L. M.; Foulkes, B. H.; Gallis, M.; Hornsby, H. R.; Louka, S. F.; Pohare, M.; Wolverson, P.; Zhang, P.; MacIntyre-Cockett, G.; Trebes, A.; Moll, R. J.; Ferguson, L.; Goldstein, E. J.; Maclean, A.; Tomb, R.; Starinskij, I.; Thomson, L.; Southgate, J.; Kraemer, M. U. G.; Raghwani, J.; Zarebski, A. E.; Boyd, O.; Geidelberg, L.; Illingworth, C. J.; Jackson, C.; Pascall, D.; Vattipally, S.; Freeman, T. M.; Hsu, S. N.; Lindsey, B. B.; James, K.; Lewis, K.; Tonkin-Hill, G.; Tovar-Corona, J. M.; Cox, M.; Abudahab, K.; Menegazzo, M.; Taylor, B. E. W.; Yeats, C. A.; Mukaddas, A.; Wright, D. W.; de Oliveira Martins, L.; Colquhoun, R.; Hill, V.; Jackson, B.; McCrone, J. T.; Medd, N.; Scher, E.; Keatley, J. P.; Curran, T.; Morgan, S.; Maxwell, P.; Smith, K.; Eldirdiri, S.; Kenyon, A.; Holmes, A. H.; Price, J. R.; Wyatt, T.; Mather, A. E.; Skvortsov, T.; Hartley, J. A.; Guest, M.; Kitchen, C.; Merrick, I.; Munn, R.; Bertolusso, B.; Lynch, J.; Vernet, G.; Kirk, S.; Wastnedge, E.; Stanley, R.; Idle, G.; Bradley, D. T.; Poyner, J.; Mori, M.; Jones, O.; Wright, V.; Brooks, E.; Churcher, C. M.; Fragakis, M.; Galai, K.; Jermy, A.; Judges, S.; McManus, G. M.; Smith, K. S.; Westwick, E.; Attwood, S. W.; Bolt, F.; Davies, A.; De Lacy, E.; Downing, F.; Edwards, S.; Meadows, L.; Jeremiah, S.; Smith, N.; Foulser, L.; Charalampous, T.; Patel, A.; Berry, L.; Boswell, T.; Fleming, V. M.; Howson-Wells, H. C.; Joseph, A.; Khakh, M.; Lister, M. M.; Bird, P. W.; Fallon, K.; Helmer, T.; McMurray, C. L.; Odedra, M.; Shaw, J.; Tang, J. W.; Willford, N. J.; Blakey, V.; Raviprakash, V.; Sheriff, N.; Williams, L. A.; Feltwell, T.; Bedford, L.; Cargill, J. S.; Hughes, W.; Moore, J.; Stonehouse, S.; Atkinson, L.; Lee, J. C. D.; Shah, D.; Alcolea-Medina, A.; Ohemeng-Kumi, N.; Ramble, J.; Sehmi, J.; Williams, R.; Chatterton, W.; Pusok, M.; Everson, W.; Castigador, A.; Macnaughton, E.; El Bouzidi, K.; Lampejo, T.; Sudhanva, M.; Breen, C.; Sluga, G.; Ahmad, S. S. Y.; George, R. P.; Machin, N. W.; Binns, D.; James, V.; Blacow, R.; Coupland, L.; Smith, L.; Barton, E.; Padgett, D.; Scott, G.; Cross, A.; Mirfenderesky, M.; Greenaway, J.; Cole, K.; Clarke, P.; Duckworth, N.; Walsh, S.; Bicknell, K.; Impey, R.; Wyllie, S.; Hopes, R.; Bishop, C.; Chalker, V.; et al..
Embase;
Preprint in English | EMBASE | ID: ppcovidwho-326827

ABSTRACT

The Delta variant of concern of SARS-CoV-2 has spread globally causing large outbreaks and resurgences of COVID-19 cases1-3. The emergence of Delta in the UK occurred on the background of a heterogeneous landscape of immunity and relaxation of non-pharmaceutical interventions4,5. Here we analyse 52,992 Delta genomes from England in combination with 93,649 global genomes to reconstruct the emergence of Delta, and quantify its introduction to and regional dissemination across England, in the context of changing travel and social restrictions. Through analysis of human movement, contact tracing, and virus genomic data, we find that the focus of geographic expansion of Delta shifted from India to a more global pattern in early May 2021. In England, Delta lineages were introduced >1,000 times and spread nationally as non-pharmaceutical interventions were relaxed. We find that hotel quarantine for travellers from India reduced onward transmission from importations;however the transmission chains that later dominated the Delta wave in England had been already seeded before restrictions were introduced. In England, increasing inter-regional travel drove Delta's nationwide dissemination, with some cities receiving >2,000 observable lineage introductions from other regions. Subsequently, increased levels of local population mixing, not the number of importations, was associated with faster relative growth of Delta. Among US states, we find that regions that previously experienced large waves also had faster Delta growth rates, and a model including interactions between immunity and human behaviour could accurately predict the rise of Delta there. Delta's invasion dynamics depended on fine scale spatial heterogeneity in immunity and contact patterns and our findings will inform optimal spatial interventions to reduce transmission of current and future VOCs such as Omicron.

6.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326624

ABSTRACT

Cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection in Manaus, Brazil, resurged in late 2020, despite high levels of previous infection there. Through genome sequencing of viruses sampled in Manaus between November 2020 and January 2021, we identified the emergence and circulation of a novel SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern, lineage P.1, that acquired 17 mutations, including a trio in the spike protein (K417T, E484K and N501Y) associated with increased binding to the human ACE2 receptor. Molecular clock analysis shows that P.1 emergence occurred around early November 2020 and was preceded by a period of faster molecular evolution. Using a two-category dynamical model that integrates genomic and mortality data, we estimate that P.1 may be 1.4-2.2 times more transmissible and 25-61% more likely to evade protective immunity elicited by previous infection with non-P.1 lineages. Enhanced global genomic surveillance of variants of concern, which may exhibit increased transmissibility and/or immune evasion, is critical to accelerate pandemic responsiveness. One-Sentence Summary: We report the evolution and emergence of a SARS-CoV-2 lineage of concern associated with rapid transmission in Manaus.

7.
International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print):16, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1583871

ABSTRACT

Purpose With a decrease in consumer spending during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, many retailers are offering price reductions to stimulate demand. However, little is known about how consumers perceive such price reductions executed during turbulent times. The authors examine whether the timing of price reductions and individual differences impact consumers' evaluations of the retailers offering such reductions. Design/methodology/approach Using a longitudinal design, the authors inquire into four retailers' motives that consumers may infer from a price decrease at two different times during the COVID-19 crisis. Findings The authors find that the timing of price reductions plays a key role in shaping consumers' inference of retailers' motives. The authors also uncover individual characteristics that affect consumers' inferences. Originality/value This research advances the literature by demonstrating the critical role of timing and individual characteristics in consumers' perceptions of price reductions during times of crisis. The authors findings also provide retailers with actionable insights for their pricing strategies. The findings may be generalizable to other types of crises that may arise in the future.

8.
PubMed; 2021.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-296567

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the importance of virus genome sequencing to guide public health interventions to control virus transmission and understand SARS-CoV-2 evolution. As of July 20th, 2021, >2 million SARS-CoV-2 genomes have been submitted to GISAID, 94% from high income and 6% from low and middle income countries. Here, we analyse the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in SARS-CoV-2 global genomic surveillance efforts. We report a comprehensive analysis of virus lineage diversity and genomic surveillance strategies adopted globally, and investigate their impact on the detection of known SARS-CoV-2 virus lineages and variants of concern. Our study provides a perspective on the global disparities surrounding SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance, their causes and consequences, and possible solutions to maximize the impact of pathogen genome sequencing for efforts on public health.

9.
PUBMED; 2021.
Preprint in English | PUBMED | ID: ppcovidwho-292866

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 Gamma variant spread rapidly across Brazil, causing substantial infection and death waves. We use individual-level patient records following hospitalisation with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to document the extensive shocks in hospital fatality rates that followed Gamma's spread across 14 state capitals, and in which more than half of hospitalised patients died over sustained time periods. We show that extensive fluctuations in COVID-19 in-hospital fatality rates also existed prior to Gamma's detection, and were largely transient after Gamma's detection, subsiding with hospital demand. Using a Bayesian fatality rate model, we find that the geographic and temporal fluctuations in Brazil's COVID-19 in-hospital fatality rates are primarily associated with geographic inequities and shortages in healthcare capacity. We project that approximately half of Brazil's COVID-19 deaths in hospitals could have been avoided without pre-pandemic geographic inequities and without pandemic healthcare pressure. Our results suggest that investments in healthcare resources, healthcare optimization, and pandemic preparedness are critical to minimize population wide mortality and morbidity caused by highly transmissible and deadly pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2, especially in low- and middle-income countries. Note: The following manuscript has appeared as 'Report 46 - Factors driving extensive spatial and temporal fluctuations in COVID-19 fatality rates in Brazilian hospitals' at https://spiral.imperial.ac.uk:8443/handle/10044/1/91875 . One sentence summary: COVID-19 in-hospital fatality rates fluctuate dramatically in Brazil, and these fluctuations are primarily associated with geographic inequities and shortages in healthcare capacity.

10.
16th European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, EC-TEL 2021 ; 12884 LNCS:300-304, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1442056

ABSTRACT

Blended learning has risen in primary and secondary schools due the COVID-19 pandemic, and is expected to remain after the pandemic. Despite this, the large majority of research into blended learning has studied university student populations. Thus, this paper seeks to research differences in usage between and in primary and secondary schools. Data were collected from a prototype learning portal, resulting in a dataset of 803 students from 12 schools with 45 teachers. Teachers and students could perform diverse actions on the platform, coded as 19 student features and 6 teacher features. These features were used to perform cluster analysis with k-means clustering on the entire dataset, split between teachers and students. Differences in primary and secondary schools were also analyzed. Clustering on the entire student dataset resulted in two clusters that differed on amounts of learning activities and learning tracks. Primary and secondary school students differed on the amount of learning activities, amount of learning tracks, and ratings of fun. Clustering on teachers resulted in two clusters differing in exploration and personalization. These results might be due to differences implementations of blended learning, where young students begin with simple rotation and complexity in implementation increases with age. These results might also be due to differences in teacher competencies. These results belie the importance of research into blended learning in pre-university education, filling a gap in literature and providing guidelines for coaching and use of multiple learning applications. © 2021, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

11.
Novyi Mir ; 6(7):282-291, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1431384

ABSTRACT

Purpose and Background: On eleventh March 2020 the global pandemic COVID was declared by WHO. One of the main mode for the transmission of virus could be work related transmission also so, the Government instructed the employees to work from home. As per the data, impactwas notonly in the physical health, mental health but also on quality of life in general.The current survey is being conducted to find the affect in quality of life in corporate employees those working from their home. Methods and material: To assess the impact of working from home on quality of life of corporate employees, the WHOQOL -BREF questionnaire was used.In total 47 sample were collected by means of online survey. Result: All four domains had positive correlation among one another. A strong positive correlation was observed between the physical and psychological domain with r=0.612. It was observed that social domain had highest mean (71.10) and standard deviation (16.83) while the lowest mean and standard deviation was observed in environmental and physical domain respectively. Conclusion: While working from home during pandemic employees had moderate quality of life in all four domains. Males had better scores in physical, psychological and social domains while women had better score in environmental domain.

12.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 15(8):OE01-OE07, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1377116

ABSTRACT

Today, we are living in the era of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19), a pandemic that has affected almost the whole globe. It has rightly been called as the ‘twenty-first-century plague’ which has garnered considerable attention from researchers, pharma companies, policymakers, and media. Though vaccines are being deployed and people are eagerly receiving vaccination;the duration of conferred immunity, the possibility of re-infection of recovered/vaccinated individuals, the consequence of the new mutation in SARS-CoV-2 and its impact and challenge for the efficacy and degree of protection that a potential vaccine could provide is under question. In the absence of any definite answer, people are turning towards natural remedies and spices. India is known globally as the land of spices. Spices like ginger, garlic, black pepper, cardamom, turmeric, clove, cinnamon, etc., are known for their rich aroma, texture, and immunity boosting ingredients. These are rich sources of antioxidants such as flavonoids and alkaloids. The antioxidants present in them, neutralise the free radicals generated inside the body during viral infections and also prevent cellular damage. These exhibit anti-inflammatory activity and have the potential to combat “cytokine storm” in severe COVID-19 infection. Their potential has been realized by the public and has led to a tremendous increase in global demand and consumption. The present review enlists the active ingredients present in important spices and addresses their antioxidants, anti-inflammatory, and anti-viral action. Traditional Indian spices that are not only a cardinal part of the diet but are affordable, easily available can be viewed as the light at the end of the tunnel to combat the current COVID-19 conditions as a preventive measure.

13.
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development ; 12(4):18-22, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1328472

ABSTRACT

Background-Coronavirus disease COVID-19 become the 5th pandemic disease since 1918 which is reported first in Wuhan, China after that its affect all over the world. In India, it is confirmed January 30, 2020. Professionally, also being challenged during this pandemic as we are moving under pressure in new model which involves re-skilling and redeploying staff for intensive care units, also reconsider of standard approaches for assessment and management. All things persist stress which leads to anxiety and depression. Purpose of the study to analyse the prevalence of perceived stress in physiotherapy profession who’s practicing in hospitals, healthcare centres or rehabilitation centres. Methods-Samples collected from online survey and expected sample size more than 30 clinical physiotherapist who’s working in different setups. Perceived stress scale-10 used under the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Inclusion Criteria-must be clinical therapist working in different setups as hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and multispecialty clinics and exclusion criteria is physiotherapist who working in academic field. Analysis carried out by Microsoft Excel 2007. Conclusion-Analysis found prevalence of perceived stress level 13% high, 68% moderate, and 19% low stress in the total respondent physiotherapist.The high prevalence of moderate perceived stress in clinical physiotherapist population which is lies under 18-29 year of age criteria. Study also depicting male perceiving high stress rather female.

14.
Wellcome Open Research ; 5:81, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068026

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 epidemic was declared a Global Pandemic by WHO on 11 March 2020. By 24 March 2020, over 440,000 cases and almost 20,000 deaths had been reported worldwide. In response to the fast-growing epidemic, which began in the Chinese city of Wuhan, Hubei, China imposed strict social distancing in Wuhan on 23 January 2020 followed closely by similar measures in other provinces. These interventions have impacted economic productivity in China, and the ability of the Chinese economy to resume without restarting the epidemic was not clear. Methods: Using daily reported cases from mainland China and Hong Kong SAR, we estimated transmissibility over time and compared it to daily within-city movement, as a proxy for economic activity. Results: Initially, within-city movement and transmission were very strongly correlated in the five mainland provinces most affected by the epidemic and Beijing. However, that correlation decreased rapidly after the initial sharp fall in transmissibility. In general, towards the end of the study period, the correlation was no longer apparent, despite substantial increases in within-city movement. A similar analysis for Hong Kong shows that intermediate levels of local activity were maintained while avoiding a large outbreak. At the very end of the study period, when China began to experience the re-introduction of a small number of cases from Europe and the United States, there is an apparent up-tick in transmission.

15.
Journal of Content, Community and Communication ; 12:70-88, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1061272

ABSTRACT

The novel corona virus disease 2019 (COVID - 2019) has spread across the globe. The Covid19 pandemic situation has created a necessity of following a social distancing for the well-being of the people. This requirement has actually supported innovative use of technology for conducting virtual meetings/lectures. The purpose of this paper is to develop an integrated model of adoption of Zoom platform by the faculties for conducting the virtual meeting/lectures in education institutes during the current Covid19 pandemic situation. Total 125 responses were collected through google form and this phenomenon is explored by Partial Least Square Structure Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) in SmartPLS version 3.3.2. Results of the survey were examined to determine the degree to which the technology acceptance model was able to explain the faculties’ acceptance of web-based learning system for conducting classes. The conceptual model for this study was developed on the basis of Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and two external variables were incorporating in the model. The research results illuminate the factors that explain and predict the faculties’ adoption of Zoom software for conducting online classes in this pandemic era. Total seven hypotheses were found to be significant except one. The findings included that faculties’ adoption of Zoom software for virtual classes influenced by environmental concern of the institute and society in the Covid-19 pandemic time. Environmental concern of the faculties is a stronger predictor of attitude of faculties towards such technology. © 2020. All Rights Reserved.

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