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1.
NEJM Catal Innov Care Deliv ; 3(3), 2022.
Article in English | PubMed Central | ID: covidwho-2077191

ABSTRACT

A multidisciplinary team of physicians, physicists, and optical engineers conceived, deployed, and scaled up an operational, financial, and educational solution to address the limited supply of a critical component of safety during the Covid-19 pandemic at 21 hospitals in low- and middle-income countries.

2.
Journal of Scientometric Research ; 11(1):47-54, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1897066

ABSTRACT

This study aims to analyze the dynamics of the published articles and preprints of Covid-19 related literature from different scientific databases and sharing platforms. The PubMed, ScienceDirect, and ResearchGate (RG) databases were under consideration in this study over a specific time. Analyses were carried out on the number of publications as (a) function of time (day), (b) journals and (c) authors. Doubling time of the number of publications was analyzed for PubMed "all articles" and ScienceDirect published articles. Analyzed databases were (1A) PubMed (01/12/2019-12/06/2020) "all_articles" (16) PubMed Review articles) and (1C) PubMed Clinical Trials (2) ScienceDirect all publications (01/12/2019- 25/05/2020) (3) RG (Article, Pre Print, Technical Report) (15/04/2020 - 30/4/2020). Total publications in the observation period for PubMed, ScienceDirect, and RG were 23000, 5898 and 5393 respectively. The average number of publications/day for PubMed, ScienceDirect and RG were 70.0 +/- 128.6, 77.6 +/- 125.3 and 255.6 +/- 205.8 respectively. PubMed shows an avalanche in the number of publications around May 10, the number of publications jumped from 6.0 +/- 8.4/day to 282.5 +/- 110.3/ day. The average doubling time for PubMed, ScienceDirect, and RG was 10.3 +/- 4 days, 20.6 days, and 2.3 +/- 2.0 days respectively. The average number of publications per author for PubMed, ScienceDirect, and RG was 1.2 +/- 1.4, 1.3 +/- 0.9, and 1.1 +/- 0.4 respectively. Subgroup analysis, PubMed review articles mean review <0 vertical bar 17 +/- 17 vertical bar 77> days: and reducing at a rate of -0.21 days (count)/day. The number of publications related to the COVID-19 until now is huge and growing very fast with time. It is essential to rationalize and limit the publications.

3.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 205:1, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1880363
4.
Indian Journal of Hematology and Blood Transfusion ; 37(SUPPL 1):S33, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1636390

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) is one of the mostcommon haematological malignancies in adults. Molecular mutationsin AML are major determinants of the patient's response to therapyand outcomes. Nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) confers a good prognosiswhile fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 gene (FLT3-ITD) is associated witha poor prognosis.Aims &Objectives: To study the prognostic molecular markers andcytogenetics of all newly diagnosed and de novo AML cases andassess the impact of the same on treatment outcome.Materials &Methods: 23 patients with newly diagnosed (adult andpaediatric) de novo AML from Jan 2021 to Aug 2021 at GauhatiMedical College, Guwahati were included in this study. We analysedthe bone marrow aspirates, clinical significance of NPM1, CEBPA,FLT3 (by real time PCR) with disease progression. Cytogenetics bykaryotyping and immunophenotypic parameters were also documented and corelated with disease progression.Result: There were (12/23)52.2% males and (11/23)47.8% female. 2patients (8.7%) were positive for FLT3 and 4(17.4%) were positivefor NPM1. (7/23)30.4% patients had t(8,21) of which 3 had normalkaryotype while 2 patients (8.7%) had turner's genotype(45,X). 4patients (17.4%) expired while receiving Induction chemotherapy, ofwhich one had 45,X,t(8,21)genotype, one had NPM1 mutation andone expired during 3 rd cycle of consolidation due to covid 19pneumonia. 6(26.1%) patients had treatment failure following intensive induction therapy of which 2 had t(8,21) with normalkaryotype(40%) and one had NPM1 mutation with wildtype FLT3.All patients with NPM1 mutation were negative for CD34 andHLADR. All patients with NPM1 and FLT3 uniformly expressed CD33.Conclusions: 3/6 patients had failure of induction in spite of havingstandard risk cytogenetics. So, next generation sequencing (NGS) iswarranted upfront for all diagnosed AML cases. It should now beincorporated as a standard of care in the management of AML. Onepatient with turner's genotype and t(8,21) expired during inductiontherapy, hence, prognostic significance of 45,X needs to be furthervalidated in AML.

5.
Working Paper Department of Economics, Iowa State University ; 20016(32), 2020.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1173192

ABSTRACT

This paper offers a parsimonious, rational-choice model to study the effect of pre-existing inequalities on the transmission of COVID-19. Agents decide whether to "go out" (or self-quarantine) and, if so, whether to wear protection such as masks. Three elements distinguish the model from existing work. First, non-symptomatic agents do not know if they are infected. Second, some of these agents unknowingly transmit infections. Third, we permit two-sided prevention via the use of non-pharmaceutical interventions: the probability of a person catching the virus from another depends on protection choices made by each. We find that a mean-preserving increase in pre-existing income inequality unambiguously increases the equilibrium proportion of unprotected, socializing agents and may increase or decrease the proportion who self-quarantine. Strikingly, while higher pre-COVID inequality may or may not raise the overall risk of infection, it increases the risk of disease in social interactions.

6.
Journal of Behavioral Science ; 16(1):114-130, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1130095

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the present study was to develop a scale for measuring coping strategies used in the novel COVID-19 pandemic among the adult residents of Kolkata in India. An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted, that included - conceptualization and generation of 36 items for 16 coping strategies with five-point response categories;relevance judgment (based on item validity index) & item validation (based on item-domain total correlation) of these items;and identification & validation of the factor structure. An online survey was conducted using snowball sampling technique during three weeks of April 2020. Complete sets could be obtained from 388 participants (200 males and 188 females). The S-CVI results (relevance of overall questionnaire) indicated high content validity (0.88) for all items of coping and significant positive item-domain total correlations were found in the process of item analysis. Based on scores of sixteen coping strategies, principal component analysis resulted in five factors as indicated by eigenvalues (1.34 to 3.32) and scree plot. These five common components were identified as positive emotion focused, escape oriented, depression developing, solution generating and self-soothing coping and a unique component- catastrophizing. This factor structure was validated through confirmatory factor analysis and same factor structure of the scale was found. Satisfactory internal consistencies of all components were found (0.61-0.89). The tool would be useful for understanding adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies used by people during a pandemic situation and it will also help in planning therapeutic intervention for combating the posttraumatic stress of this pandemic situation. Copyright © Behavioral Science Research Institute

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