Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 22
Filter
1.
Front Immunol ; 13: 820250, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775664

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 transmission mainly occurs through exposure of the upper airway mucosa to infected secretions such as saliva, which are excreted by an infected person. Thus, oral mucosal immunity plays a central role in the prevention of and early defense against SARS-CoV-2 infection. Although virus-specific antibody response has been extensively investigated in blood samples of SARS-CoV-2-infected patients and vaccinees, local humoral immunity in the oral cavity and its relationship to systemic antibody levels needs to be further addressed. Material and Methods: We fine-tuned a virus neutralization assay (vNTA) to measure the neutralizing activity (NA) of plasma and saliva samples from 20 SARS-CoV-2-infected (SI), 40 SARS-CoV-2-vaccinated (SV), and 28 SARS-CoV-2-vaccinated subjects with a history of infection (SIV) using the "wild type" SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1 (EU) and the Delta (B.1.617.2) strains. To validate the vNTA results, the presence of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) to the spike receptor binding domain (RBD) was evaluated with an ELISA assay. Results: NA to SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1 (EU) was present in plasma samples from all the tested subjects, with higher titers in SIV compared to both SI and SV. Conversely, NA was detected in saliva samples from 10.3% SV, 45% SI, and 92.6% SIV, with significantly lower titers in SV compared to both SI and SIV. The detection of NAbs in saliva reflected its reduced NA in SV. Discussion: The difference in NA of plasma vs. saliva was confirmed in a vNTA where the SARS-CoV-2 B.1 and Delta strains were tested head-to-head, which also revealed a reduced NA of both specimens compared to the B.1 variant. Conclusions: The administration of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines was associated with limited virus NA in the oral cavity, as measured in saliva and in comparison to plasma. This difference was more evident in vaccinees without a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection, possibly highlighting the importance of local exposure at the site of virus acquisition to effectively prevent the infection and block its spread. Nevertheless, the presence of immune escape mutations as possibly represented by the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant negatively affects both local and systemic efficacy of NA associated with vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Saliva , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
2.
Front Immunol ; 13: 827889, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731779

ABSTRACT

It is well established that pregnancy induces deep changes in the immune system. This is part of the physiological adaptation of the female organism to the pregnancy and the immunological tolerance toward the fetus. Indeed, over the three trimesters, the suppressive T regulatory lymphocytes are progressively more represented, while the expression of co-stimulatory molecules decreases overtime. Such adaptations relate to an increased risk of infections and progression to severe disease in pregnant women, potentially resulting in an altered generation of long-lived specific immunological memory of infection contracted during pregnancy. How potent is the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 in infected pregnant women and how long the specific SARS-CoV-2 immunity might last need to be urgently addressed, especially considering the current vaccinal campaign. To address these questions, we analyzed the long-term immunological response upon SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnant women from delivery to a six-months follow-up. In particular, we investigated the specific antibody production, T cell memory subsets, and inflammation profile. Results show that 80% developed an anti-SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG response, comparable with the general population. While IgG were present only in 50% of the asymptomatic subjects, the antibody production was elicited by infection in all the mild-to-critical patients. The specific T-cell memory subsets rebalanced over-time, and the pro-inflammatory profile triggered by specific SARS-CoV-2 stimulation faded away. These results shed light on SARS-CoV-2-specific immunity in pregnant women; understanding the immunological dynamics of the immune system in response to SARS-CoV-2 is essential for defining proper obstetric management of pregnant women and fine tune gender-specific vaccinal plans.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunologic Memory/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation/immunology , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , Prospective Studies , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vero Cells , Young Adult
3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315899

ABSTRACT

Background: UltraViolet-C (UV-C) lamps may be used to supplement current hospital cleaning and disinfection of surfaces contaminated by SARS-CoV-2. Our aim is to provide some practical indications for the correct use of UV-C lamps. Methods We studied three UV-C lamps, measuring their spatial irradiance and emission over time. We quantify the error that is committed by calculating the irradiation time based exclusively on the technical data of the lamps or by making direct irradiance measurements. Finally, we tested specific dosimeters for UV-C. Results Our results show that the spatial emission of UV-C lamps is strongly dependent on the power of the lamps and on the design of their reflectors. Only by optimizing the positioning and calculating the exposure time correctly, is it possible to dispense the dose necessary to obtain SARS-CoV-2 inactivation. In the absence of suitable equipment for measuring irradiance, the calculated irradiation time can be underestimated. We therefore consider it precautionary to increase the calculated times by at least 20%. Conclusion To use UV-C lamps effectively, it is necessary to follow a few simple precepts when choosing, positioning and verifying the lamps. In the absence of instruments dedicated to direct verification of irradiance, photochromic UV-C dosimeters may represent a useful tool for easily verifying that a proper UV-C dose has been delivered.

4.
J Photochem Photobiol ; 10: 100107, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1611878

ABSTRACT

We performed an in-depth analysis of the virucidal effect of discrete wavelengths: UV-C (278 nm), UV-B (308 nm), UV-A (366 nm) and violet (405 nm) on SARS-CoV-2. By using a highly infectious titer of SARS-CoV-2 we observed that the violet light-dose resulting in a 2-log viral inactivation is only 104 times less efficient than UV-C light. Moreover, by qPCR (quantitative Polymerase chain reaction) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) approach we verified that the viral titer typically found in the sputum of COVID-19 patients can be completely inactivated by the long UV-wavelengths corresponding to UV-A and UV-B solar irradiation. The comparison of the UV action spectrum on SARS-CoV-2 to previous results obtained on other pathogens suggests that RNA viruses might be particularly sensitive to long UV wavelengths. Our data extend previous results showing that SARS-CoV-2 is highly susceptible to UV light and offer an explanation to the reduced incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection seen in the summer season.

5.
J Clin Med ; 10(24)2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effects of immunomodulators in patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia are still unknown. We investigated the cellular inflammatory and molecular changes in response to standard-of-care + pidotimod (PDT) and explored the possible association with blood biomarkers of disease severity. METHODS: Clinical characteristics and outcomes, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), plasma and cell supernatant chemokines, and gene expression patterns after SARS-CoV-2 and influenza (FLU) virus in vitro stimulation were assessed in 16 patients with mild-moderate COVID-19 pneumonia, treated with standard of care and PDT 800 mg twice daily (PDT group), and measured at admission, 7 (T1), and 12 (T2) days after therapy initiation. Clinical outcomes and NLR were compared with age-matched historical controls not exposed to PDT. RESULTS: Hospital stay, in-hospital mortality, and intubation rate did not differ between groups. At T1, NLR was 2.9 (1.7-4.6) in the PDT group and 5.5 (3.4-7.1) in controls (p = 0.037). In the PDT group, eotaxin and IL-4 plasma concentrations progressively increased (p < 0.05). Upon SARS-CoV-2 and FLU-specific stimulation, IFN-γ was upregulated (p < 0.05), while at genetic transcription level, Pathogen Recognition Receptors (TRLs) were upregulated, especially in FLU-stimulated conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Immunomodulation exerted by PDT and systemic corticosteroids may foster a restoration in the innate response to the viral infection. These results should be confirmed in larger RCTs.

6.
Cells ; 10(11)2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523883

ABSTRACT

While the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and/or COVID-19 disease progression in the general population has been largely assessed, its impact on HIV-positive individuals remains unclear. We present clinical and immunological data collected in a cohort of HIV-infected young individuals during the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic. SARS-CoV-2 RNA, virus-specific antibodies, as well as the expression of factors involved in the anti-viral immune response were analyzed. Moreover, we set up an in vitro coinfection assay to study the mechanisms correlated to the coinfection process. Our results did not show any increased risk of severe COVID-19 in HIV-positive young individuals. In those subjects who contracted SARS-CoV-2 infection, an increase in IL-10 expression and production was observed. Furthermore, in the in vitro coinfection assay, we revealed a reduction in SARS-CoV-2 replication associated to an upregulation of IL-10. We speculate that IL-10 could play a crucial role in the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection in HIV-positive individuals. These results might help defining clinical management of HIV/SARS-CoV-2 co-infected young individuals, or putative indications for vaccination schedules in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coinfection/immunology , HIV Infections/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coinfection/virology , HIV Infections/virology , Humans , Infant , Inflammation , Interleukin-10/blood , Interleukin-10/genetics , Male , RNA, Messenger/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
7.
JCI Insight ; 6(24)2021 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518198

ABSTRACT

A substantial proportion of patients who have recovered from coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) experience COVID-19-related symptoms even months after hospital discharge. We extensively immunologically characterized patients who recovered from COVID-19. In these patients, T cells were exhausted, with increased PD-1+ T cells, as compared with healthy controls. Plasma levels of IL-1ß, IL-1RA, and IL-8, among others, were also increased in patients who recovered from COVID-19. This altered immunophenotype was mirrored by a reduced ex vivo T cell response to both nonspecific and specific stimulation, revealing a dysfunctional status of T cells, including a poor response to SARS-CoV-2 antigens. Altered levels of plasma soluble PD-L1, as well as of PD1 promoter methylation and PD1-targeting miR-15-5p, in CD8+ T cells were also observed, suggesting abnormal function of the PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint axis. Notably, ex vivo blockade of PD-1 nearly normalized the aforementioned immunophenotype and restored T cell function, reverting the observed post-COVID-19 immune abnormalities; indeed, we also noted an increased T cell-mediated response to SARS-CoV-2 peptides. Finally, in a neutralization assay, PD-1 blockade did not alter the ability of T cells to neutralize SARS-CoV-2 spike pseudotyped lentivirus infection. Immune checkpoint blockade ameliorates post-COVID-19 immune abnormalities and stimulates an anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cytokines/immunology , Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors/pharmacology , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , B7-H1 Antigen/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/drug effects , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/drug effects , DNA Methylation , Female , Humans , Immunophenotyping , In Vitro Techniques , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/drug effects , Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein/immunology , Interleukin-1beta/drug effects , Interleukin-1beta/immunology , Interleukin-8/drug effects , Interleukin-8/immunology , Male , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Middle Aged , Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors , Promoter Regions, Genetic
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(21)2021 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488618

ABSTRACT

The inflammatory response plays a central role in the complications of congenital pulmonary airway malformations (CPAM) and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The aim of this study was to evaluate the transcriptional changes induced by SARS-CoV-2 exposure in pediatric MSCs derived from pediatric lung (MSCs-lung) and CPAM tissues (MSCs-CPAM) in order to elucidate potential pathways involved in SARS-CoV-2 infection in a condition of exacerbated inflammatory response. MSCs-lung and MSCs-CPAM do not express angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TRMPSS2). SARS-CoV-2 appears to be unable to replicate in MSCs-CPAM and MSCs-lung. MSCs-lung and MSCs-CPAM maintained the expression of stemness markers MSCs-lung show an inflammatory response (IL6, IL1B, CXCL8, and CXCL10), and the activation of Notch3 non-canonical pathway; this route appears silent in MSCs-CPAM, and cytokine genes expression is reduced. Decreased value of p21 in MSCs-lung suggested no cell cycle block, and cells did not undergo apoptosis. MSCs-lung appears to increase genes associated with immunomodulatory function but could contribute to inflammation, while MSCs-CPAM keeps stable or reduce the immunomodulatory receptors expression, but they also reduce their cytokines expression. These data indicated that, independently from their perilesional or cystic origin, the MSCs populations already present in a patient affected with CPAM are not permissive for SARS-CoV-2 entry, and they will not spread the disease in case of infection. Moreover, these MSCs will not undergo apoptosis when they come in contact with SARS-CoV-2; on the contrary, they maintain their staminality profile.


Subject(s)
Mesenchymal Stem Cells/metabolism , Respiratory System Abnormalities , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Transcriptome , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/pathology , Case-Control Studies , Cells, Cultured , Gene Expression Profiling , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Infant , Lung/abnormalities , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Male , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/pathology , Mesenchymal Stem Cells/virology , RNA-Seq , Respiratory System Abnormalities/genetics , Respiratory System Abnormalities/pathology , Respiratory System Abnormalities/virology
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(19)2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438628

ABSTRACT

The reason behind the high inter-individual variability in response to SARS-CoV-2 infection and patient's outcome is poorly understood. The present study targets the sphingolipid profile of twenty-four healthy controls and fifty-nine COVID-19 patients with different disease severity. Sera were analyzed by untargeted and targeted mass spectrometry and ELISA. Results indicated a progressive increase in dihydrosphingosine, dihydroceramides, ceramides, sphingosine, and a decrease in sphingosine-1-phosphate. These changes are associated with a serine palmitoyltransferase long chain base subunit 1 (SPTLC1) increase in relation to COVID-19 severity. Severe patients showed a decrease in sphingomyelins and a high level of acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) that influences monosialodihexosyl ganglioside (GM3) C16:0 levels. Critical patients are characterized by high levels of dihydrosphingosine and dihydroceramide but not of glycosphingolipids. In severe and critical patients, unbalanced lipid metabolism induces lipid raft remodeling, leads to cell apoptosis and immunoescape, suggesting active sphingolipid participation in viral infection. Furthermore, results indicated that the sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid metabolic rewiring promoted by aSMase and GM3 is age-dependent but also characteristic of severe and critical patients influencing prognosis and increasing viral load. AUCs calculated from ROC curves indicated ceramides C16:0, C18:0, C24:1, sphingosine and SPTLC1 as putative biomarkers of disease evolution.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Sphingolipids/blood , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Lipidomics , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Sphingolipids/analysis , Sphingomyelins/analysis , Sphingomyelins/blood , Young Adult
10.
Cells ; 10(9)2021 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374305

ABSTRACT

According to the neurological symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection, it is known that the nervous system is influenced by the virus. We used pediatric human cerebral cortical cell line HCN-2 as a neuronal model of SARS-CoV-2 infection, and, through transcriptomic analysis, our aim was to evaluate the effect of SARS-CoV-2 in this type of cells. Transcriptome analyses revealed impairment in TXN gene, resulting in deregulation of its antioxidant functions, as well as a decrease in the DNA-repairing mechanism, as indicated by the decrease in KAT5. Western blot analyses of SOD1 and iNOS confirmed the impairment of reduction mechanisms and an increase in oxidative stress. Upregulation of CDKN2A and a decrease in CDK4 and CDK6 point to the blocking of the cell cycle that, according to the deregulation of repairing mechanism, has apoptosis as the outcome. A high level of proapoptotic gene PMAIP1 is indeed coherent with neuronal death, as also supported by increased levels of caspase 3. The upregulation of cell-cycle-blocking genes and apoptosis suggests a sufferance state of neurons after SARS-CoV-2 infection, followed by their inevitable death, which can explain the neurological symptoms reported. Further analyses are required to deeply explain the mechanisms and find potential treatments to protect neurons from oxidative stress and prevent their death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/virology , Cellular Senescence/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , Neurons/pathology , Oxidative Stress/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Caspase 3/metabolism , Cell Death , Cell Line , Cyclooxygenase 2/metabolism , Humans , Superoxide Dismutase/metabolism , Virus Replication/physiology
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(15)2021 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335097

ABSTRACT

Different mechanisms were proposed as responsible for COVID-19 neurological symptoms but a clear one has not been established yet. In this work we aimed to study SARS-CoV-2 capacity to infect pediatric human cortical neuronal HCN-2 cells, studying the changes in the transcriptomic profile by next generation sequencing. SARS-CoV-2 was able to replicate in HCN-2 cells, that did not express ACE2, confirmed also with Western blot, and TMPRSS2. Looking for pattern recognition receptor expression, we found the deregulation of scavenger receptors, such as SR-B1, and the downregulation of genes encoding for Nod-like receptors. On the other hand, TLR1, TLR4 and TLR6 encoding for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) were upregulated. We also found the upregulation of genes encoding for ERK, JNK, NF-κB and Caspase 8 in our transcriptomic analysis. Regarding the expression of known receptors for viral RNA, only RIG-1 showed an increased expression; downstream RIG-1, the genes encoding for TRAF3, IKKε and IRF3 were downregulated. We also found the upregulation of genes encoding for chemokines and accordingly we found an increase in cytokine/chemokine levels in the medium. According to our results, it is possible to speculate that additionally to ACE2 and TMPRSS2, also other receptors may interact with SARS-CoV-2 proteins and mediate its entry or pathogenesis in pediatric cortical neurons infected with SARS-CoV-2. In particular, TLRs signaling could be crucial for the neurological involvement related to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cerebral Cortex/metabolism , Neurons/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Cytokines/metabolism , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Neurons/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Signal Transduction/genetics , Toll-Like Receptors/genetics , Virus Replication
13.
Reprod Sci ; 28(10): 2939-2941, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1321928

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women display a higher risk of progression to disease and higher viral loads during infections due to their more permissive, tolerogenic immune system. However, only few studies have focused on SARS-CoV-2 intrapartum vertical transmission via vaginal secretions or faeces. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of the virus in vaginal, rectal and blood specimens from pregnant women characterized by different COVID-19 disease severity. We enrolled 56 SARS-CoV-2-positive pregnant women, of which 46 (82%) were in the third trimester of pregnancy, 6 (10%) in the second and 4 (7%) in the first. QPCR was performed to detect the virus in vaginal and rectal swabs and in plasma samples. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in 27% of rectal swabs of pregnant women in the third trimester, while no virus particles were detected in vaginal swabs of the same patients. Furthermore, only 4% plasma samples tested positive to SARS-CoV-2. No virus was detected in newborn's nasopharyngeal swabs. Despite the low number of subjects enrolled, our data suggest that, while theoretically possible, intrapartum vaginal or orofecal SARS-CoV-2 transmission seems to be unlikely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Nasopharynx/virology , Parturition , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Rectum/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Vagina/virology , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Young Adult
14.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 14805, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319047

ABSTRACT

Solar UV-C photons do not reach Earth's surface, but are known to be endowed with germicidal properties that are also effective on viruses. The effect of softer UV-B and UV-A photons, which copiously reach the Earth's surface, on viruses are instead little studied, particularly on single-stranded RNA viruses. Here we combine our measurements of the action spectrum of Covid-19 in response to UV light, Solar irradiation measurements on Earth during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemics, worldwide recorded Covid-19 mortality data and our "Solar-Pump" diffusive model of epidemics to show that (a) UV-B/A photons have a powerful virucidal effect on the single-stranded RNA virus Covid-19 and that (b) the Solar radiation that reaches temperate regions of the Earth at noon during summers, is sufficient to inactivate 63% of virions in open-space concentrations (1.5 × 103 TCID50/mL, higher than typical aerosol) in less than 2 min. We conclude that the characteristic seasonality imprint displayed world-wide by the SARS-Cov-2 mortality time-series throughout the diffusion of the outbreak (with temperate regions showing clear seasonal trends and equatorial regions suffering, on average, a systematically lower mortality), might have been efficiently set by the different intensity of UV-B/A Solar radiation hitting different Earth's locations at different times of the year. Our results suggest that Solar UV-B/A play an important role in planning strategies of confinement of the epidemics, which should be worked out and set up during spring/summer months and fully implemented during low-solar-irradiation periods.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Sunlight , Humans , Seasons
15.
Cells ; 10(7)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314589

ABSTRACT

MicroRNAs are gene expression regulators associated with several human pathologies, including those generated by viral infections. Their role in SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 has been investigated and reviewed in many informative studies; however, a thorough miRNA outline in SARS-CoV-2-infected pregnant women (SIPW), at both systemic and placental levels, is missing. To fill this gap, blood and placenta biopsies collected at delivery from 15 asymptomatic SIPW were immediately analysed for: miRNA expression (n = 84) (QPCR array), antiviral/immune mRNA target expression (n = 74) (QGene) and cytokine/chemokines production (n = 27) (Multiplex ELISA). By comparing these results with those obtained from six uninfected pregnant women (UPW), we observed that, following SARS-CoV-2 infection, the transcriptomic profile of pregnant women is significantly altered in different anatomical districts, even in the absence of clinical symptoms and vertical transmission. This characteristic combination of miRNA and antiviral/immune factors seems to control both the infection and the dysfunctional immune reaction, thus representing a positive correlate of protection and a potential therapeutic target against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , MicroRNAs/genetics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/genetics , Adult , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , MicroRNAs/analysis , MicroRNAs/blood , Placenta/metabolism , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/blood , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Transcriptome , Young Adult
16.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 594, 2021 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277920

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: UltraViolet-C (UV-C) lamps may be used to supplement current hospital cleaning and disinfection of surfaces contaminated by SARS-CoV-2. Our aim is to provide some practical indications for the correct use of UV-C lamps. METHODS: We studied three UV-C lamps, measuring their spatial irradiance and emission over time. We quantify the error that is committed by calculating the irradiation time based exclusively on the technical data of the lamps or by making direct irradiance measurements. Finally, we tested specific dosimeters for UV-C. RESULTS: Our results show that the spatial emission of UV-C lamps is strongly dependent on the power of the lamps and on the design of their reflectors. Only by optimizing the positioning and calculating the exposure time correctly, is it possible to dispense the dose necessary to obtain SARS-CoV-2 inactivation. In the absence of suitable equipment for measuring irradiance, the calculated irradiation time can be underestimated. We therefore consider it precautionary to increase the calculated times by at least 20%. CONCLUSION: To use UV-C lamps effectively, it is necessary to follow a few simple precepts when choosing, positioning and verifying the lamps. In the absence of instruments dedicated to direct verification of irradiance, photochromic UV-C dosimeters may represent a useful tool for easily verifying that a proper UV-C dose has been delivered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Ultraviolet Rays , Hospitals , Humans , Virus Inactivation/radiation effects
17.
Hum Immunol ; 82(8): 551-560, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265675

ABSTRACT

Given the highly polymorphic nature of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) molecules, it is not surprising that they function as key regulators of the host immune response to almost all invading pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2, the etiological agent responsible for the recent COVID-19 pandemic. Several correlations have already been established between the expression of a specific HLA allele/haplotype and susceptibility/progression of SARS-CoV-2 infection and new ones are continuously emerging. Protective and harmful HLA variants have been described in both mild and severe forms of the disease, but considering the huge amount of existing variants, the data gathered in such a brief span of time are to some extent confusing and contradictory. The aim of this mini-review is to provide a snap-shot of the main findings so far collected on the HLA-SARS-CoV-2 interaction, so as to partially untangle this intricate yarn. As key factors in the generation of antigenic peptides to be presented by HLA molecules, ERAP1 and ERAP2 role in SARS-CoV-2 infection will be revised as well.


Subject(s)
Aminopeptidases/genetics , Antigen Presentation , Antigens, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/genetics , HLA Antigens/genetics , Minor Histocompatibility Antigens/genetics , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Aminopeptidases/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Epitopes , HLA Antigens/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Minor Histocompatibility Antigens/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
18.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6260, 2021 03 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142456

ABSTRACT

The potential virucidal effects of UV-C irradiation on SARS-CoV-2 were experimentally evaluated for different illumination doses and virus concentrations (1000, 5, 0.05 MOI). At a virus density comparable to that observed in SARS-CoV-2 infection, an UV-C dose of just 3.7 mJ/cm2 was sufficient to achieve a more than 3-log inactivation without any sign of viral replication. Moreover, a complete inactivation at all viral concentrations was observed with 16.9 mJ/cm2. These results could explain the epidemiological trends of COVID-19 and are important for the development of novel sterilizing methods to contain SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/radiation effects , Ultraviolet Rays , Virus Inactivation , Virus Replication/radiation effects
19.
Cells ; 10(3)2021 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125934

ABSTRACT

We herein characterize the immunopathological features of two Italian COVID-19 patients who underwent bilateral lung transplantation (bLTx). Removed lungs underwent histopathological evaluation. Gene expression profiling (GEP) for immune-related signatures was performed on lung specimens and SARS-CoV-2-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Cytokine levels were measured on lungs, bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and in culture supernatants. Pathological assessment showed extensive lung damage with the pattern of proliferative to fibrotic phases, with diffuse alveolar damage mimicking usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Lungs' GEP revealed overexpression of pathogen recognition receptors, effector cytokines and chemokines, immune activation receptors and of the inflammasome components. Multiplex cytokine analysis confirmed a proinflammatory state, with high levels of monocyte/macrophage chemotactic and activating factors and of IL-6 and TNF-α. A similar profile was observed in SARS-CoV-2-stimulated PBMCs collected 7 days after transplant. The pattern of tissue damage observed in the lungs suggests that this may represent the output of protracted disease, resembling a diffuse UIP-like picture. The molecular immune profiling supports the paradigm of a persistent proinflammatory state and sustained humoral immunity, conditions that are maintained despite the iatrogenic immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/metabolism , Lung Transplantation , Lung/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/surgery , Adolescent , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/cytology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/blood , Gene Expression Profiling , Gene Expression Regulation/immunology , Genotype , Humans , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/virology , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Lymph Nodes/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Plasma/virology , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism
20.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 5128, 2020 10 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-851277

ABSTRACT

The impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection during gestation remains unclear. Here, we analyse the viral genome on maternal and newborns nasopharyngeal swabs, vaginal swabs, maternal and umbilical cord plasma, placenta and umbilical cord biopsies, amniotic fluids and milk from 31 mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection. In addition, we also test specific anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and expression of genes involved in inflammatory responses in placentas, and in maternal and umbilical cord plasma. We detect SARS-CoV-2 genome in one umbilical cord blood and in two at-term placentas, in one vaginal mucosa and in one milk specimen. Furthermore, we report the presence of specific anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG antibodies in one umbilical cord blood and in one milk specimen. Finally, in the three documented cases of vertical transmission, SARS-CoV-2 infection was accompanied by a strong inflammatory response. Together, these data support the hypothesis that in utero SARS-CoV-2 vertical transmission, while low, is possible. These results might help defining proper obstetric management of COVID-19 pregnant women, or putative indications for mode and timing of delivery.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/analysis , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Genome, Viral , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Inflammation , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/pathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL