Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 743248, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731860

ABSTRACT

Background: To limit the spread of COVID-19 due to imported cases, Burkina Faso has set up quarantine measures for arriving passengers. We aimed to determine the incidence and predictors of imported cases of COVID-19 in Burkina Faso. Methods: A prospective cohort study was performed using data from passengers arriving at the airport from April 9 to August 31, 2020. The data was extracted from the District Health Information Software 2 (DHIS2) platform. Cox regression was used to identify predictors of imported cases of COVID-19. Results: Among 6,332 travelers who arrived in the study period, 173 imported cases (2.7%) were recorded. The incidence rate was 1.9 cases per 1,000 traveler-days (95%CI: 1.6-2.2 per 1,000). Passengers arriving in April (Adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.56; 95%CI: 1.62-7.81) and May (aHR = 1.92; 95% CI: 1.18-3.12) were more at risk of being tested positive compared to those arriving in August, as well as, passengers presenting with one symptom (aHR = 3.71; 95% CI: 1.63-8.43) and at least two symptoms (aHR = 10.82; 95% CI: 5.24-22,30) compared to asymptomatic travelers. Conclusions: The incidence of imported cases was relatively low in Burkina Faso between April and August 2020. The period of travel and the presence of symptoms at arrival predicted the risk of being tested positive to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). This is essential in the context of the high circulation of virus variants worldwide and the low local capacity to perform genotyping tests to strengthen the surveillance and screening capacities at the points of entry into the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 15(3): 381-388, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1452868

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reliable diagnostics are a key to identifying influenza infections. OBJECTIVES: Our objectives were to describe the detection of influenza among severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) cases, to compare test results from the Fast Track Diagnostics (FTD) Kit for influenza detection to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) human influenza virus detection and characterization panel, and to assess seasonality of influenza in Burkina Faso. METHODS: Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens from SARI cases (hospitalized patients with fever, cough, and onset in the previous 10 days) were tested using the FTD-33 Kit and the CDC rRT-PCR influenza assays. We assessed sensitivity and specificity of the FTD-33 Kit for detecting influenza A, influenza B, and the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain using the CDC human influenza rRT-PCR panel as the gold standard. RESULTS: From December 2016 to February 2019, 1706 SARI cases were identified, 1511 specimens were tested, and 211 were positive for influenza A (14.0%) and 100 for influenza B (6.6%) by either assay. Higher influenza circulation occurred between November and April with varying peaks of influenza A and influenza B. Sensitivity of the FTD-33 assay was 91.9% for influenza A, 95.7% for influenza B, and 93.8% for A(H1N1)pdm09 subtype. Specificity was over 99% for all three tests. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that Burkina Faso has one peak of influenza each year which is similar to the Northern Hemisphere and differs from other countries in West Africa. We found high concordance of influenza results between the two assays indicating FTD-33 can be used to reliably detect influenza among SARI cases.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Influenza, Human , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Humans , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/genetics , Influenza, Human/diagnosis , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Laboratories , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , United States
3.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 45-52, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The overall death toll from COVID-19 in Africa is reported to be low but there is little individual-level evidence on the severity of the disease. This study examined the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients monitored in COVID-19 care centres (CCCs) in two West-African countries. METHODS: Burkina Faso and Guinea set up referral CCCs to hospitalise all symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 carriers, regardless of the severity of their symptoms. Data collected from hospitalised patients by November 2020 are presented. RESULT: A total of 1,805 patients (64% men, median age 41 years) were admitted with COVID-19. Symptoms lasted for a median of 7 days (IQR 4-11). During hospitalisation, 443 (25%) had a SpO2 < 94% at least once, 237 (13%) received oxygen and 266 (15%) took corticosteroids. Mortality was 5% overall, and 1%, 5% and 14% in patients aged <40, 40-59 and ≥60 years, respectively. In multivariable analysis, the risk of death was higher in men (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1; 3.6), people aged ≥60 years (aOR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7; 4.8) and those with chronic hypertension (aOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2; 3.4). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is as severe in Africa as elsewhere, and there must be more vigilance for common risk factors such as older age and hypertension.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int J Infect Dis ; 103: 525-526, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065178

ABSTRACT

During epidemic periods, HCW are vulnerable. In Africa, cohort studies implemented by the Institut Pasteur International Network in five countries showed after 3-month follow-up around 40% of the HCW have been infected by the SARS-CoV-2. So advocacy for HCW protection strategy need to be fostered and sustained by the health authorities all over the African continent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2 , Africa/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Epidemics , Humans , Personal Protective Equipment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL