Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 44
Filter
1.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(7): ofac227, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931886

ABSTRACT

The emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 variants that have greater transmissibility and resistance to neutralizing antibodies has increased the incidence of breakthrough infections. We show that breakthrough infection increases neutralizing antibody titers to varying degrees depending on the nature of the breakthrough variant and the number of vaccine doses previously administered. Omicron breakthrough infection resulted in neutralizing antibody titers that were the highest across all groups, particularly against Omicron.

2.
J Exp Med ; 219(8)2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922149

ABSTRACT

The single-dose Ad.26.COV.2 (Janssen) vaccine elicits lower levels of neutralizing antibodies and shows more limited efficacy in protection against infection than either of the two available mRNA vaccines. In addition, Ad.26.COV.2 has been less effective in protection against severe disease during the Omicron surge. Here, we examined the memory B cell response to single-dose Ad.26.COV.2 vaccination. Compared with mRNA vaccines, Ad.26.COV.2 recipients had significantly lower numbers of RBD-specific memory B cells 1.5 or 6 mo after vaccination. Despite the lower numbers, the overall quality of the memory B cell responses appears to be similar, such that memory antibodies elicited by both vaccine types show comparable neutralizing potency against SARS-CoV-2 Wuhan-Hu-1, Delta, and Omicron BA.1 variants. The data help explain why boosting Ad.26.COV.2 vaccine recipients with mRNA vaccines is effective and why the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine can maintain some protective efficacy against severe disease during the Omicron surge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Ad26COVS1 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , mRNA Vaccines
3.
J Exp Med ; 219(9)2022 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1922148

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to be a global problem in part because of the emergence of variants of concern that evade neutralization by antibodies elicited by prior infection or vaccination. Here we report on human neutralizing antibody and memory responses to the Gamma variant in a cohort of hospitalized individuals. Plasma from infected individuals potently neutralized viruses pseudotyped with Gamma SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, but neutralizing activity against Wuhan-Hu-1-1, Beta, Delta, or Omicron was significantly lower. Monoclonal antibodies from memory B cells also neutralized Gamma and Beta pseudoviruses more effectively than Wuhan-Hu-1. 69% and 34% of Gamma-neutralizing antibodies failed to neutralize Delta or Wuhan-Hu-1. Although Class 1 and 2 antibodies dominate the response to Wuhan-Hu-1 or Beta, 54% of antibodies elicited by Gamma infection recognized Class 3 epitopes. The results have implications for variant-specific vaccines and infections, suggesting that exposure to variants generally provides more limited protection to other variants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Antibody Formation , Humans , Membrane Glycoproteins/metabolism , Neutralization Tests , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Viral Envelope Proteins
4.
mBio ; : e0084022, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901929

ABSTRACT

Global population immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is accumulating through heterogeneous combinations of infection and vaccination. Vaccine distribution in low- and middle-income countries has been variable and reliant on diverse vaccine platforms. We studied B-cell immunity in Mexico, a middle-income country where five different vaccines have been deployed to populations with high SARS-CoV-2 incidences. Levels of antibodies that bound a stabilized prefusion spike trimer, neutralizing antibody titers, and memory B-cell expansion correlated with each other across vaccine platforms. Nevertheless, the vaccines elicited variable levels of B-cell immunity, and the majority of recipients had undetectable neutralizing activity against the recently emergent omicron variant. SARS-CoV-2 infection, experienced before or after vaccination, potentiated B-cell immune responses and enabled the generation of neutralizing activity against omicron and SARS-CoV for all vaccines in nearly all individuals. These findings suggest that broad population immunity to SARS-CoV-2 will eventually be achieved but by heterogeneous paths. IMPORTANCE The majority of studies on SARS-CoV-2 vaccine-elicited immunity and immune evasion have focused on single vaccines corresponding to those distributed in high-income countries. However, in low- and middle-income countries, vaccine deployment has been far less uniform. It is therefore important to determine the levels of immunity elicited by vaccines that have been deployed globally. Such data should help inform policy. Thus, this paper is very much a "real-world" study that focuses on a middle-income country, Mexico, in which five different vaccines based on mRNA, adenovirus, and inactivated-virus platforms have been extensively deployed, while (as documented in our study) SARS-CoV-2 variants with increasing degrees of immune evasiveness have propagated in the Mexican population, culminating in the recent emergence of B.1.1.529 (omicron).

5.
Lancet Microbe ; 3(7): e493-e502, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Serological assays are being used to monitor antibody responses in individuals who had SARS-CoV-2 infection and those who received a COVID-19 vaccine. We aimed to determine whether such assays can predict neutralising antibody titres as antibody levels wane and viral variants emerge. METHODS: We measured antibody levels in serum samples from a cohort of 112 participants with SARS-CoV-2 infection using ten high-throughput serological tests and functional neutralisation assays. Serum samples were taken at baseline and at up to four subsequent visits. We assessed the effects of time and spike protein sequence variation on the performance and predictive value of the various assays. We did correlation analyses for individual timepoints using non-parametric Spearman correlation, and differences between timepoints were determined by use of a two-tailed Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank test. FINDINGS: Neutralising antibody titres decreased over the first few months post-infection but stabilised thereafter, at about 30% of the level observed shortly after infection. Serological assays commonly used to measure antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 displayed a range of sensitivities that declined to varying extents over time. Quantitative measurements generated by serological assays based on the spike protein were better at predicting neutralising antibody titres than those based on nucleocapsid, but performance was variable, and manufacturer positivity thresholds were not able to predict the presence or absence of detectable neutralising activity. Although we observed some deterioration in correlation between serological measurements and functional neutralisation activity, some assays maintained an ability to predict neutralising titres, even against variants of concern. INTERPRETATION: The ability of high-throughput serological assays to predict neutralising antibody titres is likely to be crucial for evaluation of immunity at the population scale. These data can facilitate the selection of the most suitable assays as surrogates of functional neutralising activity and suggest that such measurements might be useful in clinical practice. FUNDING: US National Institutes of Health and National Health Service Research Scotland BioResource.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , State Medicine
6.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1863910

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that have greater transmissibility and resistance to neutralizing antibodies has increased the incidence of breakthrough infections. We show that breakthrough infection increases neutralizing antibody titers to varying degrees depending on the nature of the breakthrough variant and the number of vaccine doses previously administered. Omicron breakthrough infection resulted in neutralizing antibody titers that were the highest across, particularly against omicron.

7.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0266086, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833644

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests have been marketed to diagnose previous SARS-CoV-2 infection and as a test of immune status. There is a lack of evidence on the performance and clinical utility of these tests. We aimed to carry out an evaluation of 14 point of care (POC) SARS-CoV-2 antibody tests. Serum from participants with previous RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction) confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and pre-pandemic serum controls were used to determine specificity and sensitivity of each POC device. Changes in sensitivity with increasing time from infection were determined on a cohort of study participants. Corresponding neutralising antibody status was measured to establish whether the detection of antibodies by the POC device correlated with immune status. Paired capillary and serum samples were collected to ascertain whether POC devices performed comparably on capillary samples. Sensitivity and specificity varied between the POC devices and in general did not meet the manufacturers' reported performance characteristics, which signifies the importance of independent evaluation of these tests. The sensitivity peaked at ≥20 days following onset of symptoms, however sensitivity of 3 of the POC devices evaluated at extended time points showed that sensitivity declined with time. This was particularly marked at >140 days post infection. This is relevant if the tests are to be used for sero-prevalence studies. Neutralising antibody data showed that positive antibody results on POC devices did not necessarily confer high neutralising antibody titres, and that these POC devices cannot be used to determine immune status to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Comparison of paired serum and capillary results showed that there was a decline in sensitivity using capillary blood. This has implications in the utility of the tests as they are designed to be used on capillary blood by the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Point-of-Care Systems , Sensitivity and Specificity
8.
Nature ; 607(7917): 128-134, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1805634

ABSTRACT

The Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 infected many vaccinated and convalescent individuals1-3. Despite the reduced protection from infection, individuals who received three doses of an mRNA vaccine were highly protected from more serious consequences of infection4. Here we examine the memory B cell repertoire in a longitudinal cohort of individuals receiving three mRNA vaccine doses5,6. We find that the third dose is accompanied by an increase in, and evolution of, receptor-binding domain (RBD)-specific memory B cells. The increase is due to expansion of memory B cell clones that were present after the second dose as well as the emergence of new clones. The antibodies encoded by these cells showed significantly increased potency and breadth when compared with antibodies obtained after the second dose. Notably, the increase in potency was especially evident among newly developing clones of memory cells, which differed from persisting clones in targeting more conserved regions of the RBD. Overall, more than 50% of the analysed neutralizing antibodies in the memory compartment after the third mRNA vaccine dose neutralized the Omicron variant. Thus, individuals receiving three doses of an mRNA vaccine have a diverse memory B cell repertoire that can respond rapidly and produce antibodies capable of clearing even diversified variants such as Omicron. These data help to explain why a third dose of a vaccine that was not specifically designed to protect against variants is effective against variant-induced serious disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Immunization, Secondary , Memory B Cells , SARS-CoV-2 , mRNA Vaccines , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Humans , Memory B Cells/immunology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , mRNA Vaccines/administration & dosage , mRNA Vaccines/immunology
9.
Immunity ; 55(6): 998-1012.e8, 2022 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778212

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection or vaccination produces neutralizing antibody responses that contribute to better clinical outcomes. The receptor-binding domain (RBD) and the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the spike trimer (S) constitute the two major neutralizing targets for antibodies. Here, we use NTD-specific probes to capture anti-NTD memory B cells in a longitudinal cohort of infected individuals, some of whom were vaccinated. We found 6 complementation groups of neutralizing antibodies. 58% targeted epitopes outside the NTD supersite, 58% neutralized either Gamma or Omicron, and 14% were broad neutralizers that also neutralized Omicron. Structural characterization revealed that broadly active antibodies targeted three epitopes outside the NTD supersite including a class that recognized both the NTD and SD2 domain. Rapid recruitment of memory B cells producing these antibodies into the plasma cell compartment upon re-infection likely contributes to the relatively benign course of subsequent infections with SARS-CoV-2 variants, including Omicron.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Antibodies, Monoclonal , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Epitopes , Humans , Memory B Cells , SARS-CoV-2
10.
mBio ; 13(2): e0300221, 2022 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714353

ABSTRACT

Emerging zoonotic viral pathogens threaten global health, and there is an urgent need to discover host and viral determinants influencing infection. We performed a loss-of-function genome-wide CRISPR screen in a human lung cell line using HCoV-OC43, a human betacoronavirus. One candidate gene, VPS29, a component of the retromer complex, was required for infection by HCoV-OC43, SARS-CoV-2, other endemic- and pandemic-threat coronaviruses, as well as ebolavirus. Notably, we observed a heightened requirement for VPS29 by the recently described Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 compared to the ancestral variant. However, VPS29 deficiency had no effect on certain other viruses that enter cells via endosomes and had an opposing, enhancing effect on influenza A virus infection. Deficiency in VPS29 or other retromer components caused changes in endosome morphology and acidity and attenuated the activity of endosomal proteases. These changes in endosome properties caused incoming coronavirus, but not influenza virus particles, to become entrapped therein. Overall, these data show how host regulation of endosome characteristics can influence cellular susceptibility to viral infection and identify a host pathway that could serve as a pharmaceutical target for intervention in zoonotic viral diseases. IMPORTANCE These data identify a host pathway by which VPS29 and associated factors control the endosomal environment in a manner that influences susceptibility to viral infection. This pathway could serve as a pharmaceutical target for intervention in zoonotic viral diseases, including those caused by coronaviruses, influenza viruses, and filoviruses, all of which are pandemic threats. Our findings show how host regulation of endosome characteristics can influence viral susceptibility in both a positive and negative manner.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus OC43, Human , Influenza A virus , Humans , Influenza A virus/physiology , Pharmaceutical Preparations , SARS-CoV-2 , Vesicular Transport Proteins , Virus Internalization
13.
Elife ; 102021 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1555771

ABSTRACT

The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants threatens current vaccines and therapeutic antibodies and urgently demands powerful new therapeutics that can resist viral escape. We therefore generated a large nanobody repertoire to saturate the distinct and highly conserved available epitope space of SARS-CoV-2 spike, including the S1 receptor binding domain, N-terminal domain, and the S2 subunit, to identify new nanobody binding sites that may reflect novel mechanisms of viral neutralization. Structural mapping and functional assays show that indeed these highly stable monovalent nanobodies potently inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection, display numerous neutralization mechanisms, are effective against emerging variants of concern, and are resistant to mutational escape. Rational combinations of these nanobodies that bind to distinct sites within and between spike subunits exhibit extraordinary synergy and suggest multiple tailored therapeutic and prophylactic strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Domain Antibodies/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Binding Sites , Camelids, New World/immunology , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Male , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics
14.
Nat Immunol ; 22(12): 1503-1514, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493136

ABSTRACT

Prevention of viral escape and increased coverage against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern require therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting multiple sites of vulnerability on the coronavirus spike glycoprotein. Here we identify several potent neutralizing antibodies directed against either the N-terminal domain (NTD) or the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein. Administered in combinations, these mAbs provided low-dose protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection in the K18-human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 mouse model, using both neutralization and Fc effector antibody functions. The RBD mAb WRAIR-2125, which targets residue F486 through a unique heavy-chain and light-chain pairing, demonstrated potent neutralizing activity against all major SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. In combination with NTD and other RBD mAbs, WRAIR-2125 also prevented viral escape. These data demonstrate that NTD/RBD mAb combinations confer potent protection, likely leveraging complementary mechanisms of viral inactivation and clearance.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Animals , Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Monoclonal/metabolism , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/metabolism , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Binding Sites/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Models, Animal , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Epitope Mapping , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , Epitopes/metabolism , Humans , Mice, Transgenic , Neutralization Tests , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Survival Analysis
15.
Science ; 374(6571): 1099-1106, 2021 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1467657

ABSTRACT

Molecular virology tools are critical for basic studies of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and for developing new therapeutics. Experimental systems that do not rely on viruses capable of spread are needed for potential use in lower-containment settings. In this work, we use a yeast-based reverse genetics system to develop spike-deleted SARS-CoV-2 self-replicating RNAs. These noninfectious self-replicating RNAs, or replicons, can be trans-complemented with viral glycoproteins to generate replicon delivery particles for single-cycle delivery into a range of cell types. This SARS-CoV-2 replicon system represents a convenient and versatile platform for antiviral drug screening, neutralization assays, host factor validation, and viral variant characterization.


Subject(s)
RNA, Viral/genetics , Replicon/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Cell Line , Humans , Interferons/pharmacology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Mutation , Plasmids , RNA, Viral/metabolism , Replicon/genetics , Reverse Genetics , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/genetics , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virion/genetics , Virion/physiology , Virus Replication
17.
Nature ; 600(7889): 517-522, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454790

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection produces B cell responses that continue to evolve for at least a year. During that time, memory B cells express increasingly broad and potent antibodies that are resistant to mutations found in variants of concern1. As a result, vaccination of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) convalescent individuals with currently available mRNA vaccines produces high levels of plasma neutralizing activity against all variants tested1,2. Here we examine memory B cell evolution five months after vaccination with either Moderna (mRNA-1273) or Pfizer-BioNTech (BNT162b2) mRNA vaccine in a cohort of SARS-CoV-2-naive individuals. Between prime and boost, memory B cells produce antibodies that evolve increased neutralizing activity, but there is no further increase in potency or breadth thereafter. Instead, memory B cells that emerge five months after vaccination of naive individuals express antibodies that are similar to those that dominate the initial response. While individual memory antibodies selected over time by natural infection have greater potency and breadth than antibodies elicited by vaccination, the overall neutralizing potency of plasma is greater following vaccination. These results suggest that boosting vaccinated individuals with currently available mRNA vaccines will increase plasma neutralizing activity but may not produce antibodies with equivalent breadth to those obtained by vaccinating convalescent individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Evolution, Molecular , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , /immunology , /immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Affinity , Cohort Studies , Cross Reactions , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte/immunology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Neutralization Tests , Protein Domains/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Young Adult
18.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(9): 2454-2458, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435936

ABSTRACT

Not all persons recovering from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection develop SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies. We show that nonseroconversion is associated with younger age and higher reverse transcription PCR cycle threshold values and identify SARS-CoV-2 viral loads in the nasopharynx as a major correlate of the systemic antibody response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Humans , Nasopharynx , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroconversion
19.
Nature ; 600(7889): 512-516, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1428879

ABSTRACT

The number and variability of the neutralizing epitopes targeted by polyclonal antibodies in individuals who are SARS-CoV-2 convalescent and vaccinated are key determinants of neutralization breadth and the genetic barrier to viral escape1-4. Using HIV-1 pseudotypes and plasma selection experiments with vesicular stomatitis virus/SARS-CoV-2 chimaeras5, here we show that multiple neutralizing epitopes, within and outside the receptor-binding domain, are variably targeted by human polyclonal antibodies. Antibody targets coincide with spike sequences that are enriched for diversity in natural SARS-CoV-2 populations. By combining plasma-selected spike substitutions, we generated synthetic 'polymutant' spike protein pseudotypes that resisted polyclonal antibody neutralization to a similar degree as circulating variants of concern. By aggregating variant of concern-associated and antibody-selected spike substitutions into a single polymutant spike protein, we show that 20 naturally occurring mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein are sufficient to generate pseudotypes with near-complete resistance to the polyclonal neutralizing antibodies generated by individuals who are convalescent or recipients who received an mRNA vaccine. However, plasma from individuals who had been infected and subsequently received mRNA vaccination neutralized pseudotypes bearing this highly resistant SARS-CoV-2 polymutant spike, or diverse sarbecovirus spike proteins. Thus, optimally elicited human polyclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 should be resilient to substantial future SARS-CoV-2 variation and may confer protection against potential future sarbecovirus pandemics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Immune Evasion , Immune Sera/immunology , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Convalescence , Cross Reactions , Humans , Neutralization Tests , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
20.
Cell Rep ; 36(13): 109760, 2021 09 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401299

ABSTRACT

Many anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (anti-SARS-CoV-2) neutralizing antibodies target the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) binding site on viral spike receptor-binding domains (RBDs). Potent antibodies recognize exposed variable epitopes, often rendering them ineffective against other sarbecoviruses and SARS-CoV-2 variants. Class 4 anti-RBD antibodies against a less-exposed, but more-conserved, cryptic epitope could recognize newly emergent zoonotic sarbecoviruses and variants, but they usually show only weak neutralization potencies. Here, we characterize two class 4 anti-RBD antibodies derived from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) donors that exhibit breadth and potent neutralization of zoonotic coronaviruses and SARS-CoV-2 variants. C118-RBD and C022-RBD structures reveal orientations that extend from the cryptic epitope to occlude ACE2 binding and CDRH3-RBD main-chain H-bond interactions that extend an RBD ß sheet, thus reducing sensitivity to RBD side-chain changes. A C118-spike trimer structure reveals rotated RBDs that allow access to the cryptic epitope and the potential for intra-spike crosslinking to increase avidity. These studies facilitate vaccine design and illustrate potential advantages of class 4 RBD-binding antibody therapeutics.


Subject(s)
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Binding Sites/immunology , Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/pharmacology , Cross Reactions , Epitopes/metabolism , Humans , Protein Binding , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL