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1.
Diagnostics (Basel) ; 11(10)2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480629

ABSTRACT

Bronchoscopy has several major diagnostic and therapeutic indications in pulmonology. However, it is an aerosol-generating procedure that places healthcare providers at an increased risk of infection. Now more than ever, during the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the infectious risk during bronchoscopy is significantly raised, and for this reason its role in diagnostic management is debated. In this review, we summarized current evidence regarding the indications for bronchoscopy and the measures that should be applied to decrease risk exposure. Indeed, seeing the long-lasting period of the pandemic, resuming standard of care for all patients is required.

2.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 714570, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374237

ABSTRACT

The impact that COVID-19 could have on patients with COPD is a real concern. In this study we evaluated, in a cohort of longitudinally followed COPD subjects, the incidence of COVID-19, seeking for possible risk factors and prognostic factors predicting the clinical outcome. In our cohort of 370 patients (followed for 5.3 ± 2.7 years), 22 developed COVID-19 (COPD/COVID-19+) between February/November 2020 (5.9%). Cardio-metabolic conditions (hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, diabetes) but not respiratory abnormalities (FEV1, DLCO, emphysema and exacerbation history), were risk factors for development of COVID-19 in COPD patients. Out of the 22 COPD/COVID-19+ patients, 10 needed intensive care. Low DLCO and emphysema, but also metabolic comorbidities, were related to the need for intensive care.

3.
J Clin Med ; 9(9)2020 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-892450

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly become a global pandemic with lung disease representing the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Conventional chest-X ray (CXR) and ultrasound (US) are valuable instruments to assess the extent of lung involvement. We investigated the relationship between CXR scores on admission and the level of medical care required in patients with COVID-19. Further, we assessed the CXR-US correlation to explore the role of ultrasound in monitoring the course of COVID-19 pneumonia. Clinical features and CXR scores were obtained at admission and correlated with the level of intensity of care required [high- (HIMC) versus low-intensity medical care (LIMC)]. In a subgroup of patients, US findings were correlated with clinical and radiographic parameters. On hospital admission, CXR global score was higher in HIMCs compared to LIMC. Smoking history, pO2 on admission, cardiovascular and oncologic diseases were independent predictors of HIMC. The US score was positively correlated with FiO2 while the correlation with CXR global score only trended towards significance. Our study identifies clinical and radiographic features that strongly correlate with higher levels of medical care. The role of lung ultrasound in this setting remains undetermined and needs to be explored in larger prospective studies.

4.
Journal of Clinical Medicine ; 9(9):2990, 2020.
Article | MDPI | ID: covidwho-762518

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly become a global pandemic with lung disease representing the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Conventional chest-X ray (CXR) and ultrasound (US) are valuable instruments to assess the extent of lung involvement. We investigated the relationship between CXR scores on admission and the level of medical care required in patients with COVID-19. Further, we assessed the CXR-US correlation to explore the role of ultrasound in monitoring the course of COVID-19 pneumonia. Clinical features and CXR scores were obtained at admission and correlated with the level of intensity of care required [high- (HIMC) versus low-intensity medical care (LIMC)]. In a subgroup of patients, US findings were correlated with clinical and radiographic parameters. On hospital admission, CXR global score was higher in HIMCs compared to LIMC. Smoking history, pO2 on admission, cardiovascular and oncologic diseases were independent predictors of HIMC. The US score was positively correlated with FiO2 while the correlation with CXR global score only trended towards significance. Our study identifies clinical and radiographic features that strongly correlate with higher levels of medical care. The role of lung ultrasound in this setting remains undetermined and needs to be explored in larger prospective studies.

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