Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0272066, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1993482

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patient and stakeholders' involvement in the development of mental health interventions is a central part of the research process as end-user's input can improve the design of patient-centered interventions. This is particularly important when developing interventions directed towards improving the mental health of children and adolescents. The rising prevalence of mental health disorders in this population requires special attention and the development of interventions that include them as active participants is crucial. OBJECTIVE: Our aim is to explore the perspectives and opinions of adolescents, parents, educators/youth workers, and clinicians regarding the appeal and usability of an existing patient-centered digital intervention (DIALOG+), which aims to improve quality of life. METHODS: As part of a broader study aiming to adapt and test DIALOG+, we conducted Online Focus Groups (OFGs) with adults and adolescents in two cities in Colombia. The existing DIALOG+ intervention was introduced to participants, followed by a structured discussion regarding the opinions and views of stakeholders. A framework approach was used to identify the main themes followed by content analysis to aid adaptation. RESULTS: We conducted 10 OFGs with a total of 45 participants. A positive feature highlighted by all groups was the innovation of including a digital intervention in a traditional medical visit. Additionally, participants considered that the active role that adolescents have when using the intervention empowers them. Barriers identified included concerns from clinicians related to the time required during consultations and confusion with terminology. Furthermore, additional domains that are particularly relevant for the adolescent population were suggested. CONCLUSIONS: Data obtained suggest that overall, the DIALOG+ intervention and supporting app are seen as innovative and appealing to adolescents as well as adult stakeholders. However, concerns raised about the availability of time to apply the intervention, the app interface and the language and terminology require modification.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Quality of Life , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Colombia/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Mental Health , Qualitative Research
2.
JMIR Form Res ; 5(11): e30293, 2021 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523621

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although focus groups are a valuable qualitative research tool, face-to-face meetings may be difficult to arrange and time consuming. This challenge has been further compounded by the global COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent lockdown and physical distancing measures implemented, which caused exceptional challenges to human activities. Online focus groups (OFGs) are an example of an alternative strategy and require further study. At present, OFGs have mostly been studied and used in high-income countries, with little information relating to their implementation in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to share our experiences of conducting OFGs through a web conferencing service and provide recommendations for future research. METHODS: As part of a broader study, OFGs were developed with adults and adolescents in Colombia during the COVID-19 pandemic. Through a convenience sampling method, we invited eligible participants via email in two different cities of Colombia to participate in OFGs conducted via Microsoft Teams. Researcher notes and discussion were used to capture participant and facilitator experiences, as well as practical considerations. RESULTS: Technical issues were encountered, but various measures were taken to minimize them, such as using a web conferencing service that was familiar to participants, sending written instructions, and performing a trial meeting prior to the OFG. Adolescent participants, unlike their adult counterparts, were fluent in using web conferencing platforms and did not encounter technical challenges. CONCLUSIONS: OFGs have great potential in research settings, especially during the current and any future public health emergencies. It is important to keep in mind that even with the advantages that they offer, technical issues (ie, internet speed and access to technology) are major obstacles in LMICs. Further research is required and should carefully consider the appropriateness of OFGs in different settings.

3.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e052339, 2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406662

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Improving the mental health of young people is a global public health priority. In Latin America, young people living in deprived urban areas face various risk factors for mental distress. However, most either do not develop mental distress in the form of depression and anxiety, or recover within a year without treatment from mental health services. This research programme seeks to identify the personal and social resources that help young people to prevent and recover from mental distress. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A cross-sectional study will compare personal and social resources used by 1020 young people (aged 15-16 and 20-24 years) with symptoms of depression and/or anxiety and 1020 without. A longitudinal cohort study will follow-up young people with mental distress after 6 months and 1 year and compare resource use in those who do and do not recover. An experience sampling method study will intensively assess activities, experiences and mental distress in subgroups over short time periods. Finally, we will develop case studies highlighting existing initiatives that effectively support young people to prevent and recover from mental distress. The analysis will assess differences between young people with and without distress at baseline using t-tests and χ2 tests. Within the groups with mental distress, multivariate logistic regression analyses using a random effects model will assess the relationship between predictor variables and recovery. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethics approvals are received from Ethics Committee in Biomedical Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Buenos Aires; Faculty of Medicine-Research and Ethics Committee of the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá; Institutional Ethics Committee of Research of the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia and Queen Mary Ethics of Research Committee. Dissemination will include arts-based methods and target different audiences such as national stakeholders, researchers from different disciplines and the general public. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN72241383.


Subject(s)
Longitudinal Studies , Adolescent , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Latin America , Prospective Studies
4.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(3)2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311147

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health disorders are viewed as a global concern requiring globally led approaches to address them. Since the publication of the 2007 Lancet series on global mental health (GMH), the term has become widespread. Over the last two decades, GMH has become increasingly affiliated with policy reform, academic courses, funding bodies and research. However, it is not always obvious how those working in the field of GMH are using the term, resulting in a lack of clarity. Therefore, work is needed to synthesise the current understanding(s) of GMH to help characterise its meaning. AIM: To synthesise the literature and identify the different ways GMH is understood. METHOD: A conceptual review, using a systematic search and a content analysis, was conducted to develop a conceptual framework of the different conceptual understandings of GMH. RESULTS: We developed a conceptual framework of four understandings of GMH. These understandings of GMH are as follows: an area of research generating findings to establish a GMH evidence-base; implementation of research into practice; improving the mental health environment; learning from and supporting low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs). CONCLUSION: Our review proposes a simple framework, clarifying the key characteristics of the GMH landscape. The findings highlight the diversity of usage of the term in the literature, as well as present the wide scope that comprises the field of GMH. Referring to this framework may help those engaged with GMH to be more specific with which aspect of the field they are concerned with.


Subject(s)
Global Health , Mental Health , Humans , Poverty
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL