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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335191

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Clinical diagnoses rely on a wide variety of laboratory tests and imaging studies, interpreted alongside physical examination and documentation of symptoms and patient history. However, the tools of diagnosis make little use of the immune system’s internal record of specific disease exposures encoded by the antigen-specific receptors of memory B cells and T cells. We have combined extensive receptor sequence datasets with three different machine learning representations of the contents of immune repertoires to develop an interpretive framework, MAchine Learning for Immunological Diagnosis (Mal-ID) , that screens for multiple illnesses simultaneously. This approach can already reliably distinguish a wide range of disease states, including specific acute or chronic infections, and autoimmune or immunodeficiency disorders, and could contribute to identifying new infectious diseases as they emerge. Importantly, many features of the model of immune receptor sequences are human-interpretable. They independently recapitulate known biology of the responses to infection by SARS-CoV-2 or HIV, and reveal common features of autoreactive immune receptor repertoires, indicating that machine learning on immune repertoires can yield new immunological knowledge.

2.
Cell Rep Med ; : 100640, 2022 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819630

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-specific CD4+ T cells are likely important in immunity against coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19), but our understanding of CD4+ longitudinal dynamics following infection and of specific features that correlate with the maintenance of neutralizing antibodies remains limited. Here, we characterize SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ T cells in a longitudinal cohort of 109 COVID-19 outpatients enrolled during acute infection. The quality of the SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4+ response shifts from cells producing interferon gamma (IFNγ) to tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) from 5 days to 4 months post-enrollment, with IFNγ-IL-21-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells the predominant population detected at later time points. Greater percentages of IFNγ-IL-21-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells on day 28 correlate with SARS-CoV-2-neutralizing antibodies measured 7 months post-infection (⍴ = 0.4, p = 0.01). mRNA vaccination following SARS-CoV-2 infection boosts both IFNγ- and TNF-α-producing, spike-protein-specific CD4+ T cells. These data suggest that SARS-CoV-2-specific, TNF-α-producing CD4+ T cells may play an important role in antibody maintenance following COVID-19.

3.
Cell ; 185(8): 1414-1430.e19, 2022 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1757193

ABSTRACT

Cytokines are powerful immune modulators that initiate signaling through receptor dimerization, but natural cytokines have structural limitations as therapeutics. We present a strategy to discover cytokine surrogate agonists by using modular ligands that exploit induced proximity and receptor dimer geometry as pharmacological metrics amenable to high-throughput screening. Using VHH and scFv to human interleukin-2/15, type-I interferon, and interleukin-10 receptors, we generated combinatorial matrices of single-chain bispecific ligands that exhibited diverse spectrums of functional activities, including potent inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 by surrogate interferons. Crystal structures of IL-2R:VHH complexes revealed that variation in receptor dimer geometries resulted in functionally diverse signaling outputs. This modular platform enabled engineering of surrogate ligands that compelled assembly of an IL-2R/IL-10R heterodimer, which does not naturally exist, that signaled through pSTAT5 on T and natural killer (NK) cells. This "cytokine med-chem" approach, rooted in principles of induced proximity, is generalizable for discovery of diversified agonists for many ligand-receptor systems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cytokines , Humans , Interleukin-2/pharmacology , Killer Cells, Natural , Ligands , Receptors, Interleukin-10 , SARS-CoV-2
4.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-331000

ABSTRACT

Objective Clinicians in the emergency department (ED) face challenges in concurrently assessing patients with suspected COVID-19 infection, detecting bacterial co-infection, and determining illness severity since current practices require separate workflows. Here we explore the accuracy of the IMX-BVN-3/IMX-SEV-3 29 mRNA host response classifiers in simultaneously detecting SARS-CoV-2 infection, bacterial co-infections, and predicting clinical severity of COVID-19. Methods 161 patients with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 (52.2% female, median age 50.0 years, 51% hospitalized, 5.6% deaths) were enrolled at the Stanford Hospital ED. RNA was extracted (2.5 mL whole blood in PAXgene Blood RNA) and 29 host mRNAs in response to the infection were quantified using Nanostring nCounter. Results The IMX-BVN-3 classifier identified SARS-CoV-2 infection in 151 patients with a sensitivity of 93.8%. Six of 10 patients undetected by the classifier had positive COVID tests more than 9 days prior to enrolment and the remaining oscillated between positive and negative results in subsequent tests. The classifier also predicted that 6 (3.7%) patients had a bacterial co-infection. Clinical adjudication confirmed that 5/6 (83.3%) of the patients had bacterial infections, i.e. Clostridioides difficile colitis (n=1), urinary tract infection (n=1), and clinically diagnosed bacterial infections (n=3) for a specificity of 99.4%. 2/101 (2.8%) patients in the IMX-SEV-3 Low and 7/60 (11.7%) in the Moderate severity classifications died within thirty days of enrollment. Conclusions IMX-BVN-3/IMX-SEV-3 classifiers accurately identified patients with COVID-19, bacterial co-infections, and predicted patients’ risk of death. A point-of-care version of these classifiers, under development, could improve ED patient management including more accurate treatment decisions and optimized resource utilization.

5.
Science ; 375(6585): 1122-1127, 2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736000

ABSTRACT

Considerable research effort has been made worldwide to decipher the immune response triggered upon severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections, identify the drivers of severe and fatal COVID-19, and understand what leads to the prolongation of symptoms after disease resolution. We review the results of almost 2 years of COVID-19 immunology research and discuss definitive findings and remaining questions regarding our understanding of COVID-19 pathophysiology. We discuss emerging understanding of differences in immune responses seen in those with and without Long Covid syndrome, also known as post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2. We hope that the knowledge gained from this COVID-19 research will be applied in studies of inflammatory processes involved in critical and chronic illnesses, which remain a major unmet need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Inflammation , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Sci Transl Med ; 14(634): eabn7842, 2022 03 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723505

ABSTRACT

Multiple severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants that have mutations associated with increased transmission and antibody escape have arisen over the course of the current pandemic. Although the current vaccines have largely been effective against past variants, the number of mutations found on the Omicron (B.1.1.529) spike protein appear to diminish the protection conferred by preexisting immunity. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudoparticles expressing the spike protein of several SARS-CoV-2 variants, we evaluated the magnitude and breadth of the neutralizing antibody response over time in individuals after infection and in mRNA-vaccinated individuals. We observed that boosting increases the magnitude of the antibody response to wild-type (D614), Beta, Delta, and Omicron variants; however, the Omicron variant was the most resistant to neutralization. We further observed that vaccinated healthy adults had robust and broad antibody responses, whereas responses may have been reduced in vaccinated pregnant women, underscoring the importance of learning how to maximize mRNA vaccine responses in pregnant populations. Findings from this study show substantial heterogeneity in the magnitude and breadth of responses after infection and mRNA vaccination and may support the addition of more conserved viral antigens to existing SARS-CoV-2 vaccines.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , /immunology
7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313371

ABSTRACT

Background: Prolonged symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection are well-documented. However, which factors influence development of long-term symptoms, how symptoms vary across ethnic groups, and whether long-term symptoms correlate with serologic biomarkers remain elusive. Methods: Adult inpatient and outpatient SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR positive patients were recruited at Stanford from March 2020 to February 2021. Study participants were seen for in-person visits at diagnosis and every 1-3 months for up to one year after diagnosis;they completed symptom surveys and underwent sampling procedures (blood draw and nasal swab) at each visit. Findings: Our cohort (n=617) ranged from asymptomatic to critical COVID-19 infections. 40% of participants reported at least one symptom associated with COVID-19 six months after diagnosis. Median time from diagnosis to first resolution of all symptoms was 44 days, median time from diagnosis to sustained symptom resolution with no recurring symptoms for one month or longer was 214 days. Serum anti-nucleocapsid IgG level in the first week of infection was predictive of time to symptom resolution. A prior diagnosis of lung disease was associated with longer time to symptom resolution. COVID-19 disease severity, ethnicity, sex, cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositivity, and remdesivir use did not affect time to sustained symptom resolution. More than 90% of participants had SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody>1000 AU/mL nine months after diagnosis. Interpretation: Our findings showed that all disease severities had a similar risk of developing post-COVID-19 syndrome in an ethnically diverse population. Comorbid lung disease and lower levels of initial IgG response to SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid antigen were associated with longer symptom duration. Trial Registration: National clinical trial database NCT04664309.Funding: NIH CTSA grant, U54 NIH Grant, R21 NIEHS, Sean N Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford University, the Sunshine Foundation, the Crown Foundation, and the Parker Foundation.Declaration of Interest: Dr. Boyd received support for the current manuscript from Meso Scale Discovery and NIH;418 received consulting fees by Regeneron for expert testimony, has stocks or stock options in 419 AbCellera Biologics;Dr. Chinthrajah reports grants from NIAID, CoFAR, Aimmune, DBV 420 Technologies, Astellas, Regeneron, Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute 421 (MCHRI), and FARE. She is an Advisory Board Member at Alladapt Therapeutics, Novartis, 422 Genentech, Sanofi, Allergenis, and Nutricia;Dr. Manisha Desai received support from Chan 423 Zuckerberg Foundation;Dr. Maecker received grants or contracts from NIH, Bill & Melinda 424 Gates Foundation, Ionis Corporation, Amgen Corporation;Consulting fees from Magarray Corp;425 payment or honoraria from UCLA, UC Davis;leadership or fiduciary role at Cytek SAB;stocks 426 or stock options at BD Biosciences;Dr. Nadeau reports grants from National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), and Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE);Director of World Allergy Organization (WAO) , Advisor at Cour Pharma, Consultant for Excellergy, Red tree ventures, and Phylaxis, Co-founder of Before Brands, Alladapt, Latitude, and IgGenix;and National Scientific Committee member at Immune Tolerance Network (ITN), and National Institutes of Health (NIH) clinical research centers, outside the submitted work;patents include, “Mixed allergen composition and methods for using the same”, “Granulocyte-based methods for detecting and monitoring immune system disorders”, “Methods and Assays for Detecting and Quantifying Pure Subpopulations of White Blood Cells in Immune System Disorders,” and “Methods of isolating allergen-specific antibodies from humans and uses thereof”;Dr. Benjamin Pinsky received grants or contracts for the present manuscript from MesoScale Diagno tics;Dr. Angele Rogers was a Clinical Trials Advisory Board Member for Merck;Dr. Sindher reports support for the present manuscript from the NIH, Regeneron, DBV Technologies, Aimmune, Novartis, CoFAR, FARE, participated on a DSMB for Astra Zeneca, DBV, and received payment or honorarium from FARE;Neera Ahuja, Maja Artandi, Linda Barman, Catherine Blish, Andra Blomkalns, William Collins, MacKenzie Cox, Linda Geng, Xiaolin Jia, Megan Mahoney, Monali Manohar, Ruth O’hara, Rajan Puri, Katharina Roltgen, Laura Vaughan, Samuel Yang, Shu Cao, Iris Chang, Hena Din, Evan Do, Andrea Fernandez, Alexandra Lee, Natasha Purington, Yael Rosenberg-Hasson, Theo Snow, Daniel Solis, Michelle Verghese, and Yingjie Weng have no conflict of interest.Ethical Approval: This study was reviewed and approved by the Stanford Administrative Panel on Human Subjects in Medical Research.

8.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328540

ABSTRACT

The great majority of SARS-CoV-2 infections are mild and uncomplicated, but some individuals with initially mild COVID-19 progressively develop more severe symptoms. Furthermore, there is substantial heterogeneity in SARS-CoV-2-specific memory immune responses following infection. There remains a critical need to identify host immune biomarkers predictive of clinical and immunologic outcomes in SARS-CoV-2-infected patients. Leveraging longitudinal samples and data from a clinical trial in SARS-CoV-2 infected outpatients, we used host proteomics and transcriptomics to characterize the trajectory of the immune response in COVID-19 patients within the first 2 weeks of symptom onset. We identify early immune signatures, including plasma RIG-I levels, early interferon signaling, and related cytokines (CXCL10, MCP1, MCP-2 and MCP-3) associated with subsequent disease progression, control of viral shedding, and the SARS-CoV-2 specific T cell and antibody response measured up to 7 months after enrollment. We found that several biomarkers for immunological outcomes are shared between individuals receiving BNT162b2 (Pfizer–BioNTech) vaccine and COVID-19 patients. Finally, we demonstrate that machine learning models using 7-10 plasma protein markers measured early within the course of infection are able to accurately predict disease progression, T cell memory, and the antibody response post-infection in a second, independent dataset.

9.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327426

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Inference of cell-cell communication (CCC) from single-cell RNA-sequencing data is a powerful technique to uncover putative axes of multicellular coordination, yet existing methods perform this analysis at the level of the cell type or cluster, discarding single-cell level information. Here we present Scriabin – a flexible and scalable framework for comparative analysis of CCC at single-cell resolution. We leverage multiple published datasets to show that Scriabin recovers expected CCC edges and use spatial transcriptomic data to validate that the recovered edges are biologically meaningful. We then apply Scriabin to uncover co-expressed programs of CCC from atlas-scale datasets, validating known communication pathways required for maintaining the intestinal stem cell niche as well as previously unappreciated modes of intercellular communication. Finally, we utilize single-cell communication networks calculated using Scriabin to follow communication pathways that operate between timepoints in longitudinal datasets, highlighting bystander cells as important initiators of inflammatory reactions in acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our approach represents a broadly applicable strategy to leverage single-cell resolution data maximally toward uncovering CCC circuitry and rich niche-phenotype relationships in health and disease.

10.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327138

ABSTRACT

SARS–CoV–2–specific CD4 + T cells are likely important in immunity against COVID–19, but our understanding of CD4 + longitudinal dynamics following infection, and specific features that correlate with the maintenance of neutralizing antibodies, remains limited. We characterized SARS–CoV–2–specific CD4 + T cells in a longitudinal cohort of 109 COVID–19 outpatients. The quality of the SARS–CoV–2–specific CD4 + response shifted from cells producing IFNγ to TNFα from five days to four months post–enrollment, with IFNγ − IL21 − TNFα + CD4 + T cells the predominant population detected at later timepoints. Greater percentages of IFNγ − IL21 − TNFα + CD4 + T cells on day 28 correlated with SARS–CoV–2 neutralizing antibodies measured seven months post–infection (ρ=0.4, P=0.01). mRNA vaccination following SARS–CoV–2 infection boosted both IFNγ and TNFα producing, spike protein–specific CD4 + T cells. These data suggest that SARS–CoV–2–specific, TNFα–producing CD4 + T cells may play an important role in antibody maintenance following COVID–19.

11.
PLoS Pathog ; 18(2): e1009914, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686113

ABSTRACT

As novel SARS-CoV-2 variants continue to emerge, it is critical that their potential to cause severe disease and evade vaccine-induced immunity is rapidly assessed in humans and studied in animal models. In early January 2021, a novel SARS-CoV-2 variant designated B.1.429 comprising 2 lineages, B.1.427 and B.1.429, was originally detected in California (CA) and it was shown to have enhanced infectivity in vitro and decreased antibody neutralization by plasma from convalescent patients and vaccine recipients. Here we examine the virulence, transmissibility, and susceptibility to pre-existing immunity for B 1.427 and B 1.429 in the Syrian hamster model. We find that both variants exhibit enhanced virulence as measured by increased body weight loss compared to hamsters infected with ancestral B.1 (614G), with B.1.429 causing the most marked body weight loss among the 3 variants. Faster dissemination from airways to parenchyma and more severe lung pathology at both early and late stages were also observed with B.1.429 infections relative to B.1. (614G) and B.1.427 infections. In addition, subgenomic viral RNA (sgRNA) levels were highest in oral swabs of hamsters infected with B.1.429, however sgRNA levels in lungs were similar in all three variants. This demonstrates that B.1.429 replicates to higher levels than ancestral B.1 (614G) or B.1.427 in the oropharynx but not in the lungs. In multi-virus in-vivo competition experiments, we found that B.1. (614G), epsilon (B.1.427/B.1.429) and gamma (P.1) dramatically outcompete alpha (B.1.1.7), beta (B.1.351) and zeta (P.2) in the lungs. In the nasal cavity, B.1. (614G), gamma, and epsilon dominate, but the highly infectious alpha variant also maintains a moderate size niche. We did not observe significant differences in airborne transmission efficiency among the B.1.427, B.1.429 and ancestral B.1 (614G) and WA-1 variants in hamsters. These results demonstrate enhanced virulence and high relative oropharyngeal replication of the epsilon (B.1.427/B.1.429) variant in Syrian hamsters compared to an ancestral B.1 (614G) variant.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Mesocricetus , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/classification , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Virulence
12.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(2): ofab646, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672245

ABSTRACT

Determinants of Post-Acute Sequelae of COVID-19 are not known. Here we show that 83.3% of patients with viral RNA in blood (RNAemia) at presentation were symptomatic in the post-acute phase. RNAemia at presentation successfully predicted PASC, independent of patient demographics, worst disease severity, and length of symptoms.

13.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 1511(1): 59-86, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625044

ABSTRACT

The rapid development of COVID-19 vaccines was the result of decades of research to establish flexible vaccine platforms and understand pathogens with pandemic potential, as well as several novel changes to the vaccine discovery and development processes that partnered industry and governments. And while vaccines offer the potential to drastically improve global health, low-and-middle-income countries around the world often experience reduced access to vaccines and reduced vaccine efficacy. Addressing these issues will require novel vaccine approaches and platforms, deeper insight how vaccines mediate protection, and innovative trial designs and models. On June 28-30, 2021, experts in vaccine research, development, manufacturing, and deployment met virtually for the Keystone eSymposium "Innovative Vaccine Approaches" to discuss advances in vaccine research and development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccines/therapeutic use
14.
Non-conventional in English | [Unspecified Source], Grey literature | ID: grc-750507

ABSTRACT

During virus infection B cells are critical for the production of antibodies and protective immunity. Here we show that the human B cell compartment in patients with diagnostically confirmed SARS-CoV-2 and clinical COVID-19 is rapidly altered with the early recruitment of B cells expressing a limited subset of IGHV genes, progressing to a highly polyclonal response of B cells with broader IGHV gene usage and extensive class switching to IgG and IgA subclasses with limited somatic hypermutation in the initial weeks of infection. We identify extensive convergence of antibody sequences across SARS-CoV-2 patients, highlighting stereotyped naive responses to this virus. Notably, sequence-based detection in COVID-19 patients of convergent B cell clonotypes previously reported in SARS-CoV infection predicts the presence of SARS-CoV/SARS-CoV-2 cross-reactive antibody titers specific for the receptor-binding domain. These findings offer molecular insights into shared features of human B cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 and other zoonotic spillover coronaviruses.

15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 739037, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448729

ABSTRACT

Background: Transfusion of COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) containing high titers of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies serves as therapy for COVID-19 patients. Transfusions early during disease course was found to be beneficial. Lessons from the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic could inform early responses to future pandemics and may continue to be relevant in lower resource settings. We sought to identify factors correlating to high antibody titers in convalescent plasma donors and understand the magnitude and pharmacokinetic time course of both transfused antibody titers and the endogenous antibody titers in transfused recipients. Methods: Plasma samples were collected up to 174 days after convalescence from 93 CCP donors with mild disease, and from 16 COVID-19 patients before and after transfusion. Using ELISA, anti-SARS-CoV-2 Spike RBD, S1, and N-protein antibodies, as well as capacity of antibodies to block ACE2 from binding to RBD was measured in an in vitro assay. As an estimate for viral load, viral RNA and N-protein plasma levels were assessed in COVID-19 patients. Results: Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody levels and RBD-ACE2 blocking capacity were highest within the first 60 days after symptom resolution and markedly decreased after 120 days. Highest antibody titers were found in CCP donors that experienced fever. Effect of transfused CCP was detectable in COVID-19 patients who received high-titer CCP and had not seroconverted at the time of transfusion. Decrease in viral RNA was seen in two of these patients. Conclusion: Our results suggest that high titer CCP should be collected within 60 days after recovery from donors with past fever. The much lower titers conferred by transfused antibodies compared to endogenous production in the patient underscore the importance of providing CCP prior to endogenous seroconversion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Convalescence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroconversion , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antigens, Viral/blood , Blood Donors , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , Outpatients , RNA, Viral/blood
16.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(10): e1009412, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448584

ABSTRACT

Viral proteins localize within subcellular compartments to subvert host machinery and promote pathogenesis. To study SARS-CoV-2 biology, we generated an atlas of 2422 human proteins vicinal to 17 SARS-CoV-2 viral proteins using proximity proteomics. This identified viral proteins at specific intracellular locations, such as association of accessary proteins with intracellular membranes, and projected SARS-CoV-2 impacts on innate immune signaling, ER-Golgi transport, and protein translation. It identified viral protein adjacency to specific host proteins whose regulatory variants are linked to COVID-19 severity, including the TRIM4 interferon signaling regulator which was found proximal to the SARS-CoV-2 M protein. Viral NSP1 protein adjacency to the EIF3 complex was associated with inhibited host protein translation whereas ORF6 localization with MAVS was associated with inhibited RIG-I 2CARD-mediated IFNB1 promoter activation. Quantitative proteomics identified candidate host targets for the NSP5 protease, with specific functional cleavage sequences in host proteins CWC22 and FANCD2. This data resource identifies host factors proximal to viral proteins in living human cells and nominates pathogenic mechanisms employed by SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Host-Parasite Interactions/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Viral Proteins/metabolism , Humans , Protein Biosynthesis/physiology , Proteome/metabolism
17.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(7): ofab310, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322651

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the persistence of viral RNA in clinically recovered coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients, subgenomic RNAs (sgRNAs) have been reported as potential molecular viability markers for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, few data are available on their longitudinal kinetics, compared with genomic RNA (gRNA), in clinical samples. METHODS: We analyzed 536 samples from 205 patients with COVID-19 from placebo-controlled, outpatient trials of peginterferon Lambda-1a (Lambda; n = 177) and favipiravir (n = 359). Nasal swabs were collected at 3 time points in the Lambda (days 1, 4, and 6) and favipiravir (days 1, 5, and 10) trials. N-gene gRNA and sgRNA were quantified by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. To investigate the decay kinetics in vitro, we measured gRNA and sgRNA in A549ACE2+ cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, following treatment with remdesivir or dimethylsulfoxide control. RESULTS: At 6 days in the Lambda trial and 10 days in the favipiravir trial, sgRNA remained detectable in 51.6% (32/62) and 49.5% (51/106) of the samples, respectively. Cycle threshold (Ct) values for gRNA and sgRNA were highly linearly correlated (marginal R 2 = 0.83), and the rate of increase did not differ significantly in the Lambda trial (1.36 cycles/d vs 1.36 cycles/d; P = .97) or the favipiravir trial (1.03 cycles/d vs 0.94 cycles/d; P = .26). From samples collected 15-21 days after symptom onset, sgRNA was detectable in 48.1% (40/83) of participants. In SARS-CoV-2-infected A549ACE2+ cells treated with remdesivir, the rate of Ct increase did not differ between gRNA and sgRNA. CONCLUSIONS: In clinical samples and in vitro, sgRNA was highly correlated with gRNA and did not demonstrate different decay patterns to support its application as a viability marker.

18.
J Exp Med ; 218(8)2021 08 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269483

ABSTRACT

Our understanding of protective versus pathological immune responses to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is limited by inadequate profiling of patients at the extremes of the disease severity spectrum. Here, we performed multi-omic single-cell immune profiling of 64 COVID-19 patients across the full range of disease severity, from outpatients with mild disease to fatal cases. Our transcriptomic, epigenomic, and proteomic analyses revealed widespread dysfunction of peripheral innate immunity in severe and fatal COVID-19, including prominent hyperactivation signatures in neutrophils and NK cells. We also identified chromatin accessibility changes at NF-κB binding sites within cytokine gene loci as a potential mechanism for the striking lack of pro-inflammatory cytokine production observed in monocytes in severe and fatal COVID-19. We further demonstrated that emergency myelopoiesis is a prominent feature of fatal COVID-19. Collectively, our results reveal disease severity-associated immune phenotypes in COVID-19 and identify pathogenesis-associated pathways that are potential targets for therapeutic intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Innate/physiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Case-Control Studies , Cytokines/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Female , Hematopoiesis , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Killer Cells, Natural/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/pathology , Monocytes/virology , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Neutrophils/pathology , Neutrophils/virology , Proteomics , Severity of Illness Index , Single-Cell Analysis
19.
Cell ; 184(13): 3573-3587.e29, 2021 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248834

ABSTRACT

The simultaneous measurement of multiple modalities represents an exciting frontier for single-cell genomics and necessitates computational methods that can define cellular states based on multimodal data. Here, we introduce "weighted-nearest neighbor" analysis, an unsupervised framework to learn the relative utility of each data type in each cell, enabling an integrative analysis of multiple modalities. We apply our procedure to a CITE-seq dataset of 211,000 human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with panels extending to 228 antibodies to construct a multimodal reference atlas of the circulating immune system. Multimodal analysis substantially improves our ability to resolve cell states, allowing us to identify and validate previously unreported lymphoid subpopulations. Moreover, we demonstrate how to leverage this reference to rapidly map new datasets and to interpret immune responses to vaccination and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our approach represents a broadly applicable strategy to analyze single-cell multimodal datasets and to look beyond the transcriptome toward a unified and multimodal definition of cellular identity.


Subject(s)
SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Single-Cell Analysis/methods , 3T3 Cells , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , Cell Line , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Humans , Immunity/immunology , Leukocytes, Mononuclear/immunology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Mice , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Transcriptome/immunology , Vaccination
20.
ACS Cent Sci ; 7(4): 650-657, 2021 Apr 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225484

ABSTRACT

Severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by infection with SARS-CoV-2, are characterized by a hyperinflammatory immune response that leads to numerous complications. Production of proinflammatory neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) has been suggested to be a key factor in inducing a hyperinflammatory signaling cascade, allegedly causing both pulmonary tissue damage and peripheral inflammation. Accordingly, therapeutic blockage of neutrophil activation and NETosis, the cell death pathway accompanying NET formation, could limit respiratory damage and death from severe COVID-19. Here, we demonstrate that synthetic glycopolymers that activate signaling of the neutrophil checkpoint receptor Siglec-9 suppress NETosis induced by agonists of viral toll-like receptors (TLRs) and plasma from patients with severe COVID-19. Thus, Siglec-9 agonism is a promising therapeutic strategy to curb neutrophilic hyperinflammation in COVID-19.

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