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1.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 1027586, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109790

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in high hospitalization rates worldwide. Acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients hospitalized for COVID-19 is frequent and associated with disease severity and poor outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of kidney replacement therapy (KRT) in critically ill patients with COVID-19 and its implication on outcome. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed all COVID-19 patients admitted to the Department of Intensive Care Medicine at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany) between 1 March 2020 and 31 July 2021. Demographics, clinical parameters, type of organ support, length of intensive care unit (ICU) stay, mortality and severity scores were assessed. Results: Three-hundred critically ill patients with COVID-19 were included. The median age of the study population was 61 (IQR 51-71) years and 66% (n = 198) were male. 73% (n = 219) of patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. Overall, 68% (n = 204) of patients suffered from acute respiratory distress syndrome and 30% (n = 91) required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We found that 46% (n = 139) of patients required KRT. Septic shock (OR 11.818, 95% CI: 5.941-23.506, p < 0.001), higher simplified acute physiology scores (SAPS II) (OR 1.048, 95% CI: 1.014-1.084, p = 0.006) and vasopressor therapy (OR 5.475, 95% CI: 1.127-26.589, p = 0.035) were independently associated with the initiation of KRT. 61% (n = 85) of patients with and 18% (n = 29) without KRT died in the ICU (p < 0.001). Cox regression found that KRT was independently associated with mortality (HR 2.075, 95% CI: 1.342-3.208, p = 0.001) after adjusting for confounders. Conclusion: Critically ill patients with COVID-19 are at high risk of acute kidney injury with about half of patients requiring KRT. The initiation of KRT was associated with high mortality.

2.
Blood Purif ; : 1-10, 2022 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2020585

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Immunomodulatory therapies have shown beneficial effects in patients with severe COVID-19. Patients with hypercytokinemia might benefit from the removal of inflammatory mediators via hemadsorption. METHODS: Single-center prospective randomized trial at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Patients with confirmed COVID-19, refractory shock (norepinephrine ≥0.2 µg/kg/min to maintain a mean arterial pressure ≥65 mm Hg), interleukin-6 (IL-6) ≥500 ng/L, and an indication for renal replacement therapy or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were included. Patients received either hemadsorption therapy (HT) or standard medical therapy (SMT). For HT, a CytoSorb® adsorber was used for up to 5 days and was replaced every 18-24 h. The primary endpoint was sustained hemodynamic improvement (norepinephrine ≤0.05 µg/kg/min ≥24 h). RESULTS: Of 242 screened patients, 24 were randomized and assigned to either HT (N = 12) or SMT (N = 12). Both groups had similar severity as assessed by SAPS II (median 75 points HT group vs. 79 SMT group, p = 0.590) and SOFA (17 vs. 16, p = 0.551). Median IL-6 levels were 2,269 (IQR 948-3,679) and 3,747 (1,301-5,415) ng/L in the HT and SMT groups at baseline, respectively (p = 0.378). Shock resolution (primary endpoint) was reached in 33% (4/12) versus 17% (2/12) in the HT and SMT groups, respectively (p = 0.640). Twenty-eight-day mortality was 58% (7/12) in the HT compared to 67% (8/12) in the SMT group (p = 1.0). During the treatment period of 5 days, 6/12 (50%) of the SMT patients died, in contrast to 1/12 (8%) in the HT group. CONCLUSION: HT was associated with a non-significant trend toward clinical improvement within the intervention period. In selected patients, HT might be an option for stabilization before transfer and further therapeutic decisions. This finding warrants further investigation in larger trials.

3.
Dtsch Med Wochenschr ; 147(6): 319-325, 2022 03.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740507

ABSTRACT

MONITORING OF ANALGESIA, SEDATION AND DELIRIUM: The prerequisite for monitoring goal-oriented analgesia and screening for the presence of delirium is the use of validated measuring instruments such as the Richmond Agitation and Sedation Scale as well as an adequate medical and intensive care staffing ratio. IMPLEMENTATION OF ANALGESIA AND SEDATION: The goal, if possible, is an awake, oriented, cooperative patient who is free of pain. In this regard, multimodal analgesic treatment is of great importance. The lowest possible sedation should also be aimed for in COVID-19 patients, although deep sedation is recommended for invasively ventilated COVID-19 patients in the prone position.


Subject(s)
Analgesia , COVID-19 , Delirium , COVID-19/therapy , Delirium/therapy , Humans , Pain , Pain Management
4.
J Clin Med ; 11(4)2022 Feb 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701768

ABSTRACT

The spread of SARS-CoV-2 caused a worldwide healthcare threat. High critical care admission rates related to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) respiratory failure were observed. Medical advances helped increase the number of patients surviving the acute critical illness. However, some patients require prolonged critical care. Data on the outcome of patients with a chronic critical illness (CCI) are scarce. Single-center retrospective study including all adult critically ill patients with confirmed COVID-19 treated at the Department of Intensive Care Medicine at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, between 1 March 2020 and 8 August 2021. We identified 304 critically ill patients with COVID-19 during the study period. Of those, 55% (n = 167) had an ICU stay ≥21 days and were defined as chronic critical illness, and 45% (n = 137) had an ICU stay <21 days. Age, sex and BMI were distributed equally between both groups. Patients with CCI had a higher median SAPS II (CCI: 39.5 vs. no-CCI: 38 points, p = 0.140) and SOFA score (10 vs. 6, p < 0.001) on admission. Seventy-three per cent (n = 223) of patients required invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) (86% vs. 58%; p < 0.001). The median duration of MV was 30 (17-49) days and 7 (4-12) days in patients with and without CCI, respectively (p < 0.001). The regression analysis identified ARDS (OR 3.238, 95% CI 1.827-5.740, p < 0.001) and referral from another ICU (OR 2.097, 95% CI 1.203-3.654, p = 0.009) as factors significantly associated with new-onset of CCI. Overall, we observed an ICU mortality of 38% (n = 115) in the study cohort. In patients with CCI we observed an ICU mortality of 28% (n = 46) compared to 50% (n = 69) in patients without CCI (p < 0.001). The 90-day mortality was 28% (n = 46) compared to 50% (n = 70), respectively (p < 0.001). More than half of critically ill patients with COVID-19 suffer from CCI. Short and long-term survival rates in patients with CCI were high compared to patients without CCI, and prolonged therapy should not be withheld when resources permit prolonged therapy.

5.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-313239

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Immunomodulatory therapies have shown beneficial effects in patients with severe COVID-19. Patients with hypercytokinemia might benefit from removal of inflammatory mediators via hemadsorption. Methods: : Single-center prospective randomized trial at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Patients with confirmed COVID-19, refractory shock (norepinephrine ≥0.2 μg/kg/min to maintain a mean arterial pressure ≥ 65 mmHg), IL-6≥500 ng/l and an indication for renal replacement therapy (RRT) or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) were included. Patients received either hemadsorption therapy (HT) or standard medical therapy (SMT). For HT, a CytoSorb® adsorber was used for up to 5 days and was replaced every 18–24 hours. The primary endpoint was sustained hemodynamic improvement (norepinephrine ≤0.05 µg/kg/min≥24h). Secondary endpoints included 28-day mortality, SOFA, and reduction of IL-6, PCT, and MR-proADM. Results: : Of 242 screened patients, 24 were randomized and assigned to either HT (N=12) or SMT (N=12). Both groups had similar severity as assessed by SAPS II (median 75 points HT group vs. 79 SMT group, p=0.590) and SOFA (17 vs. 16, p=0.551). At randomization, 22 (92%) patients were on RRT and 11 (46%) had vv-ECMO. Median IL-6 levels were 2269 (IQR 948–3679) and 3747 (1301–5415) ng/l in the HT and SMT group at baseline, respectively (p=0.378). Serum IL-6 reduction in the first 24h of treatment compared between both groups was 83% vs. 46% (p=0.235). Shock resolution (primary endpoint) was reached in 33% (4/12) vs. 17% (2/12) in the HT and SMT group, respectively (p=0.640). 28-day mortality was 58% (7/12) in the HT compared to 67% (8/12) in the SMT group (p=1.0). Conclusion: HT was associated with a non-significant trend towards clinical improvement within the intervention period including reduction of IL-6 levels and shock resolution. In selected patients, HT might therefore be an option for stabilization and bridge to transfer and decision. ( Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04344080, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04344080, trial registration date 04/14/2020)]

6.
J Clin Med ; 10(22)2021 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524051

ABSTRACT

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) represents a viable therapy option for patients with refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Currently, veno-venous (vv) ECMO is frequently used in patients suffering from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). VV-ECMO was also frequently utilised during the influenza pandemic and experience with this complex and invasive treatment has increased worldwide since. However, data on comparison of clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with COVID-19 and influenza-related severe ARDS treated with vv-ECMO are scarce. This is a retrospective analysis of all consecutive patients treated with vv/(veno-arterial)va-ECMO between January 2009 and January 2021 at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf in Germany. All patients with confirmed COVID-19 or influenza were included. Patient characteristics, parameters related to ICU and vv/va-ECMO as well as clinical outcomes were compared. Mortality was assessed up to 90 days after vv/va-ECMO initiation. Overall, 113 patients were included, 52 (46%) with COVID-19 and 61 (54%) with influenza-related ARDS. Median age of patients with COVID-19 and influenza was 58 (IQR 53-64) and 52 (39-58) years (p < 0.001), 35% and 31% (p = 0.695) were female, respectively. Charlson Comorbidity Index was 3 (1-5) and 2 (0-5) points in the two groups (p = 0.309). Median SAPS II score pre-ECMO was 27 (24-36) vs. 32 (28-41) points (p = 0.009), and SOFA score was 13 (11-14) vs. 12 (8-15) points (p = 0.853), respectively. Median P/F ratio pre-ECMO was 64 (46-78) and 73 (56-104) (p = 0.089); pH was 7.20 (7.16-7.29) and 7.26 (7.18-7.33) (p = 0.166). Median days on vv/va-ECMO were 17 (7-27) and 11 (7-20) (p = 0.295), respectively. Seventy-one percent and sixty-nine percent had renal replacement therapy (p = 0.790). Ninety-four percent of patients with COVID-19 and seventy-seven percent with influenza experienced vv/va-ECMO-associated bleeding events (p = 0.004). Thirty-four percent and fifty-five percent were successfully weaned from ECMO (p = 0.025). Ninety-day mortality was 65% and 57% in patients with COVID-19 and influenza, respectively (p = 0.156). Median length of ICU stay was 24 (13-44) and 28 (16-14) days (p = 0.470), respectively. Despite similar disease severity, the use of vv/va-ECMO in ARDS related to COVID-19 and influenza resulted in similar outcomes at 90 days. A significant higher rate of bleeding complications and thrombosis was observed in patients with COVID-19.

7.
J Clin Med ; 10(10)2021 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234757

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) led to an ongoing pandemic with a surge of critically ill patients. Very little is known about the occurrence and characteristic of cardiac arrest in critically ill patients with COVID-19 treated at the intensive care unit (ICU). The aim was to investigate the incidence and outcome of intensive care unit cardiac arrest (ICU-CA) in critically ill patients with COVID-19. This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of all consecutive adult patients with COVID-19 admitted (27 February 2020-14 January 2021) at the University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Of 183 critically ill patients with COVID-19, 18% (n = 33) had ICU-CA. The median age of the study population was 63 (55-73) years and 66% (n = 120) were male. Demographic characteristics and comorbidities did not differ significantly between patients with and without ICU-CA. Simplified Acute Physiological Score II (SAPS II) (ICU-CA: median 44 points vs. no ICU-CA: 39 points) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (median 12 points vs. 7 points) on admission were significantly higher in patients with ICU-CA. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was present in 91% (n = 30) with and in 63% (n = 94) without ICU-CA (p = 0.002). Mechanical ventilation was more common in patients with ICU-CA (97% vs. 67%). The median stay in ICU before CA was 6 (1-17) days. A total of 33% (n = 11) of ICU-CAs occurred during the first 24 h of ICU stay. The initial rhythm was non-shockable (pulseless electrical activity (PEA)/asystole) in 91% (n = 30); 94% (n = 31) had sustained return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). The median time to ROSC was 3 (1-5) minutes. Patients with ICU-CA had significantly higher ICU mortality (61% vs. 37%). Multivariable logistic regression showed that the presence of ARDS (odds ratio (OR) 4.268, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.211-15.036; p = 0.024) and high SAPS II (OR 1.031, 95% CI 0.997-1.065; p = 0.077) were independently associated with the occurrence of ICU-CA. A total of 18% of critically ill patients with COVID-19 suffered from a cardiac arrest within the intensive care unit. The occurrence of ICU-CA was associated with presence of ARDS and severity of illness.

8.
Biomarkers ; 26(5): 417-424, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1146879

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: About 20% of ICU patients with COVID-19 require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) might be used for risk assessment. This study investigates MR-proADM for RRT prediction in ICU patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We analysed data of consecutive patients with COVID-19, requiring ICU admission at a university hospital in Germany between March and September 2020. Clinical characteristics, details on AKI, and RRT were assessed. MR-proADM was measured on admission. RESULTS: 64 patients were included (49 (77%) males). Median age was 62.5y (54-73). 47 (73%) patients were ventilated and 50 (78%) needed vasopressors. 25 (39%) patients had severe ARDS, and 10 patients needed veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. 29 (45%) patients required RRT; median time from admission to RRT start was 2 (1-9) days. MR-proADM on admission was higher in the RRT group (2.491 vs. 1.23 nmol/l; p = 0.002) and showed the highest correlation with renalSOFA. ROC curve analysis showed that MR-proADM predicts RRT with an AUC of 0.69 (95% CI: 0.543-0.828; p = 0.019). In multivariable logistic regression MR-proADM was an independent predictor (OR: 3.813, 95% CI 1.110-13.102, p<0.05) for RRT requirement. CONCLUSION: AKI requiring RRT is frequent in ICU patients with COVID-19. MR-proADM on admission was able to predict RRT requirement, which may be of interest for risk stratification and management.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adrenomedullin/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Critical Illness/therapy , Protein Precursors/metabolism , Renal Replacement Therapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Aged , Biomarkers/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Germany , Hospitals, University , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , ROC Curve , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 44, 2021 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133608

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 caused a pandemic and global threat for human health. Presence of liver injury was commonly reported in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, reports on severe liver dysfunction (SLD) in critically ill with COVID-19 are lacking. We evaluated the occurrence, clinical characteristics and outcome of SLD in critically ill patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Clinical course and laboratory was analyzed from all patients with confirmed COVID-19 admitted to ICU of the university hospital. SLD was defined as: bilirubin ≥ 2 mg/dl or elevation of aminotransferase levels (> 20-fold ULN). RESULTS: 72 critically ill patients were identified, 22 (31%) patients developed SLD. Presenting characteristics including age, gender, comorbidities as well as clinical presentation regarding COVID-19 overlapped substantially in both groups. Patients with SLD had more severe respiratory failure (paO2/FiO2: 82 (58-114) vs. 117 (83-155); p < 0.05). Thus, required more frequently mechanical ventilation (95% vs. 64%; p < 0.01), rescue therapies (ECMO) (27% vs. 12%; p = 0.106), vasopressor (95% vs. 72%; p < 0.05) and renal replacement therapy (86% vs. 30%; p < 0.001). Severity of illness was significantly higher (SAPS II: 48 (39-52) vs. 40 (32-45); p < 0.01). Patients with SLD and without presented viremic during ICU stay in 68% and 34%, respectively (p = 0.002). Occurrence of SLD was independently associated with presence of viremia [OR 6.359; 95% CI 1.336-30.253; p < 0.05] and severity of illness (SAPS II) [OR 1.078; 95% CI 1.004-1.157; p < 0.05]. Mortality was high in patients with SLD compared to other patients (68% vs. 16%, p < 0.001). After adjustment for confounders, SLD was independently associated with mortality [HR3.347; 95% CI 1.401-7.999; p < 0.01]. CONCLUSION: One-third of critically ill patients with COVID-19 suffer from SLD, which is associated with high mortality. Occurrence of viremia and severity of illness seem to contribute to occurrence of SLD and underline the multifactorial cause.

11.
Aust Crit Care ; 34(2): 167-175, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-950142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are large uncertainties with regard to the outcome of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and mechanical ventilation (MV). High mortality (50-97%) was proposed by some groups, leading to considerable uncertainties with regard to outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to investigate the characteristics and outcomes of critically ill patients with COVID-19 requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission and MV. METHODS: A multicentre retrospective observational cohort study at 15 hospitals in Hamburg, Germany, was performed. Critically ill adult patients with COVID-19 who completed their ICU stay between February and June 2020 were included. Patient demographics, severity of illness, and ICU course were retrospectively evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 223 critically ill patients with COVID-19 were included. The majority, 73% (n = 163), were men; the median age was 69 (interquartile range = 58-77.5) years, with 68% (n = 151) patients having at least one chronic medical condition. Their Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score was a median of 5 (3-9) points on admission. Overall, 167 (75%) patients needed MV. Noninvasive ventilation and high-flow nasal cannula were used in 31 (14%) and 26 (12%) patients, respectively. Subsequent MV, due to noninvasive ventilation/high-flow nasal cannula therapy failure, was necessary in 46 (81%) patients. Renal replacement therapy was initiated in 33% (n = 72) of patients, and owing to severe respiratory failure, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was necessary in 9% (n = 20) of patients. Experimental antiviral therapy was used in 9% (n = 21) of patients. Complications during the ICU stay were as follows: septic shock (40%, n = 90), heart failure (8%, n = 17), and pulmonary embolism (6%, n = 14). The length of ICU stay was a median of 13 days (5-24), and the duration of MV was 15 days (8-25). The ICU mortality was 35% (n = 78) and 44% (n = 74) among mechanically ventilated patients. CONCLUSION: In this multicentre observational study of 223 critically ill patients with COVID-19, the survival to ICU discharge was 65%, and it was 56% among patients requiring MV. Patients showed high rate of septic complications during their ICU stay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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