Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 14 de 14
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580715

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of pandemic control measures requires a broad understanding from the population. This study aimed to evaluate the role played by health literacy (HL) in influencing the adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures and risk perception of essential frontline workers during the lockdown period. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on a population-based sample of frontline workers from Prato Province (Italy). Data on knowledge, attitudes and practices towards COVID-19 preventive measures and risk perception were collected. HL was measured with the HLS-EU-Q6 tool. Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: A total of 751 people participated in this study, and 56% of the sample showed a sufficient level of HL. In the multivariate models, HL resulted in being positively correlated with both knowledge (beta 0.32 for sufficient HL, 0.11 for problematic HL) and attitudes (beta 0.33 for sufficient HL, 0.17 for problematic HL) towards the importance of COVID-19 preventive measures. The HL level was not associated with the adoption of preventive behaviors and COVID-19 risk perception. CONCLUSIONS: HL may play a key role in maintaining a high adherence to infection prevention behaviors and may be a factor to take into account in the implementation of public health interventions in pandemic times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(9)2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411054

ABSTRACT

Background: Vaccination is a worldwide public health practice that requires high uptake levels in order to effectively reduce the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases. The manufacturing of vaccines is a complex process, and little is known about people's feelings and opinions on that. Our study aimed at investigating perceptions and attitudes of the general population towards the vaccine production process before the availability of COVID-19 vaccines. Methods: We designed a 15-question online survey in the Italian language which was spread via Facebook and an Italian website "Vaccinarsintoscana" between January and May 2020. We performed a descriptive analysis and applied statistical tests to assess differences in the given answers according to participants' sociodemographic characteristics. Results: The collected responses (135 participants) about the perceptions on vaccine production process were largely positive: not being concerned about the vaccine production (70.3%); believing the vials did not contain harmful substances (75.6%) and considering the precautionary withdrawal of some batches as highly effective (83.7%). In contrast, a less positive perception was found for the question about the conflict of interest between manufacturing companies and the control systems (48.9%). Moreover, people's perceptions towards the vaccine components (i.e., microorganism, adjuvants and opinion on batches withdrawal) also showed a good level of confidence and trust. Conclusions: Our study highlighted a generally positive attitude towards the vaccine production process and showed people's confidence in the control systems, safety and high standards of quality of the vaccine production process.

3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(9)2021 Aug 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403890

ABSTRACT

Background: Tdap (Tetanus-Diphtheria-acellular Pertussis) vaccination is nowadays a worldwide-recommended practice to immunize pregnant women. The vaccine administration at the third trimester of pregnancy (as recommended by the WHO) would ensure antibody protection to both the mother and the newborn and has contributed to the significant drop of pertussis cases in infants. The aim of this observational study was to describe for the first time the socio-demographic characteristics and determinants of Tdap vaccination adhesion of pregnant women in the Florentine area. Methods: Information about parents' vaccination status, their citizenship, employment type and mothers' previous pregnancies and/or abortions were collected at the time of birth through the assistance birth certificates (CedAP) both for the years 2019 and 2020. This archive and the regional SISPC (Collective Prevention Healthcare Information System) linked using an anonymous unique personal identifier to retrieve the mother's vaccination status. Results: We found an overall Tdap vaccination adhesion of 43% in 2019 and 47.3% in 2020. Several socio-demographic parameters would determine an increased vaccination adhesion, including parents' geographical origin, mothers' age and educational background, as well as the number of previous deliveries, abortions or voluntary termination of pregnancy. Conclusions: Since not much data are available on this topic in Italy, this study may constitute the baseline information for Tdap vaccination adhesion in pregnant women in the Florentine area (Italy). Thus, future successful vaccination strategies may be designed accordingly.

4.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(6)2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1362619

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccine hesitancy has been recognized as a major global health threat by the World Health Organization. Many studies have investigated vaccine safety as a determinant for vaccine hesitancy; however, not much attention has been paid to vaccine production and quality control during the vaccine production process or whether knowledge about this topic may influence vaccine confidence. The aim of this study was to characterize the common knowledge about the vaccine production process. METHODS: A freely accessible online questionnaire was developed on Google Modules and disseminated through social networks. A descriptive analysis of the collected answers was performed, and the chi-square test was used to assess significant differences for the sociodemographic characteristics of the study population (age, gender, work or education and training in the healthcare setting, minor offspring). A binary logistic regression model was performed considering these socio-demographic categories as independent variables. RESULTS: The number of collected questionnaire was 135. Most of the participants (127/135, 94.1%) were aware that quality control measures are carried out during manufacturing, although some knowledge gaps emerged in specific aspects of the vaccine production process, without statistically significant differences between age groups. Working in the healthcare setting or being educated in healthcare may be considered predictors for a better understanding that more than 50% of the production time is spent on quality control (AOR = 3.43; 95% CI: 1.84-8.14, p = 0.01) and that considering quality control performed during the vaccine production process is adequate for avoiding contamination (AOR = 7.90; 95% CI: 0.97-64.34; p = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study allowed for a characterization of common knowledge about the vaccine production process. It highlighted the need to implement specific strategies to spread correct information about the vaccine production process. This study may contribute to increased confidence and trust in vaccines and vaccination among the general population.

5.
COVID ; 1(1):20-38, 2021.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1288817

ABSTRACT

This review explores and positions the value of serology testing to support current immunization policies and the broader policy response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis in Europe. We applied an exploratory approach to analysing existing evidence, international recommendations, and national policies using desk research from secondary sources, document analysis, and expert information. Regional and country-level resources from five focus countries were included: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Seven experts in the fields of COVID-19 immunization, serology testing, seroepidemiology, and vaccine safety and effectiveness studies contributed to the review and convened in two online panel sessions. The paper includes an overview of (1) the impact of the pandemic to date, (2) testing strategies, (3) COVID-19 vaccination policies, (4) lessons on using serology testing to support immunization, (5) current policies and recommendations on the use of a serology testing strategy, and (6) implementation barriers and challenges. Finally, this paper also provides a set of knowledge-based recommendations to advance the effective and timely inclusion of serology testing and resolve impeding knowledge gaps. The recommendations herein are intended to support timely decision-making, raise awareness, guide advocacy initiatives, and inspire future studies.

6.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(6)2021 Jun 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264545

ABSTRACT

Vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 represents an effective and safe tool to protect the population against the disease; however, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy could be a major barrier to achieving herd immunity. Despite the severity of the current pandemic, the population's intention to get vaccinated against COVID-19 is still not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the intention to get vaccinated against COVID-19 among a convenience sample of the general population resident in Italy and the factors associated with hesitancy and acceptance of the vaccine in the context of the current pandemic before the rolling out of COVID-19 vaccines. An anonymous online survey was diffused among a general adult population living in Italy. Participants aged 18 or older and living in Italy were considered eligible. Incomplete questionnaires were excluded. Overall, 7605 valid questionnaires were collected. Most of the participants (81.9%) were inclined to get vaccinated; male sex (OR 1.38, 95% CI 1.12-1.71), a high level of trust in institutions (OR 3.93, 95% CI 2.04-7.83), and personal beliefs about high safety of COVID-19 vaccines (OR 56.33, 95% CI 31.57-105.87) were found to be among the significant predictors of COVID-19 acceptance. These data could help design larger studies to address the problem of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in the current pandemic.

7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244013

ABSTRACT

In 2013, in a bid to combat Vaccine Hesitancy (VH) and provide information on vaccines by communicating with the general public and the health community (e.g., healthcare workers and public health operators), the Italian Society of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine (S.It.I.) published the national website "VaccinarSì". The project was subsequently extended to ten Italian Regions. This led to the creation of the VaccinarSì Network, whose websites are publicly owned. The aim of this work was to present the framework of the websites of the VaccinarSì Network and to analyse user behaviour in the pre-COVID-19-era (dating from each website's publication until 31 January 2020) and in the COVID-19-era (from 1 February 2020 to 31 January 2021). Some metrics such as the number of visits to the site (sessions, number of users and average session duration), user behaviour (pages viewed, bounce rate and organic search) and the session acquisition path (direct traffic, referrals and social traffic) were searched, extrapolated and processed with Google Analytics. Qualitative and normally distributed quantitative variables were summarised with their absolute (relative) frequencies and means. Statistical differences between the means of the two periods were evaluated through paired t-test. A two-tailed p-value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. When the total values recorded over the period were compared, an overall increase in metrics was observed-the number of individual users, visits and individual pageviews rose in a statistically significant way. Our study aimed to highlight how combining disciplines such as health education and digital communication via Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) represents the best strategy to support citizens. This approach gives them the tools to become independent and responsible players that are capable of voluntarily and consciously choosing to adhere to vaccination programs. The VaccinarSì Network's goal for the future is to reach an even wider audience. By building each user's critical knowledge, this network enables users to be active components of a wider, more empowered community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Communication , Vaccines , Communication , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; 20(6): 639-647, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147905

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Disease prevention and improving vaccination coverage in Europe are key elements contributing to resilient health systems and ensuring better health outcomes for all. The aim of this study was to describe the immunization funding landscape across all European Union 28 countries (EU28). AREAS COVERED: Data collected in a targeted literature review supported descriptive analysis on the different indicators that were looked at: vaccines included in the EU28 national immunization programs (NIP), national immunization funding, immunization funding per capita (2015-2019) and percentage of health-care budget allocated to immunization. EXPERT OPINION: Immunization funding represents a small proportion of total healthcare spend in Europe (median 0.3%). In the context of the current COVID-19 pandemic, demographic changes, and the potential introduction of new vaccines; the need for adequate financing of immunization programs will be important, to establish resilient immunization systems and provide sustainable protection of the population against vaccine-preventable diseases.


PLAIN LANGUAGE SUMMARYWhat is the context?Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a viral disease characterized by a painful, localized skin rash. It affects approximately 32% of US citizens at least once in their lifetime.The risk of contracting shingles increases with age.Most American adults over 50 years have not received the shingles vaccine, and vaccination rates are especially low for African-Americans.What is new?This is the first study to evaluate what drives shingles vaccination decisions among US adults ≥ 50 years of age. We also assessed the differences between African-American and non-African-American adults, and inside the African-American group.In this choice experiment, 1,454 people ≥ 50 years completed a survey of 8 choice questions, as well as questions on their previous experiences with vaccines, socioeconomic, and demographic characteristics. Seven factors were evaluated.We found that American adults preferred to get vaccinated, and the most influential factors were costs and vaccine effectiveness while location of vaccination was the least important. There were differences in preferences between African-American and non-African-American adults, mainly driven by costs and vaccine effectiveness. 3 different groups of African-American adults with systematically different preferences could be identified; two were likely to vaccinate, with one being more cost sensitive at lower price thresholds, and the third was unlikely to vaccinate.What is the impact?Decisions on shingles vaccination appear to be mostly driven by costs, which could be a barrier to those who do not have appropriate insurance, especially among some African-Americans.However, healthcare professionals should continue to educate patients on other vaccine characteristics, as they also influence vaccination decisions.


Subject(s)
Immunization Programs/economics , Vaccines/economics , COVID-19 , Europe , Humans , Pandemics
9.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 8(4)2020 Dec 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1016275

ABSTRACT

Serosurveys may help to assess the transmission dynamics in high-risk groups. The aim of the study was to assess the SARS-CoV-2 antibody seroprevalence in people who had performed essential activities during the lock-down period in the Province of Prato (Italy), and to evaluate the risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 according to the type of service. All the workers and volunteers of the Civil Protection, employees of the municipalities, and all the staff of the Health Authority of the Province of Prato were invited to be tested with a rapid serological test. A total of 4656 participants were tested. SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were found in 138 (2.96%) cases. The seroprevalence in health care workers, in participants involved in essential support services and in those who worked from home were 4.1%, 1.4% and 1.0%, respectively. Health care workers experienced higher odds of seropositivity (OR 4.38, 95%CI 2.19-10.41) than participants who were assigned to work-from-home; no significant seropositivity differences were observed between support services and work-from-home groups. A low circulation of SARS-CoV-2 was observed among participants performing different essential activities. Findings highlighted the risk of in-hospital transmission in healthcare workers and that community support services may increase the risk of seropositivity to a limited extent in low incidence areas.

10.
Vaccines ; 8(4):778, 2020.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-984492

ABSTRACT

Serosurveys may help to assess the transmission dynamics in high-risk groups. The aim of the study was to assess the SARS-CoV-2 antibody seroprevalence in people who had performed essential activities during the lock-down period in the Province of Prato (Italy), and to evaluate the risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 according to the type of service. All the workers and volunteers of the Civil Protection, employees of the municipalities, and all the staff of the Health Authority of the Province of Prato were invited to be tested with a rapid serological test. A total of 4656 participants were tested. SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were found in 138 (2.96%) cases. The seroprevalence in health care workers, in participants involved in essential support services and in those who worked from home were 4.1%, 1.4% and 1.0%, respectively. Health care workers experienced higher odds of seropositivity (OR 4.38, 95%CI 2.19–10.41) than participants who were assigned to work-from-home;no significant seropositivity differences were observed between support services and work-from-home groups. A low circulation of SARS-CoV-2 was observed among participants performing different essential activities. Findings highlighted the risk of in-hospital transmission in healthcare workers and that community support services may increase the risk of seropositivity to a limited extent in low incidence areas.

11.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 8(4)2020 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948863

ABSTRACT

The last 2019/20 northern hemisphere influenza season overlapped with the first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Italy was the first western country where severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spread to a significant extent. In this representative cross-sectional survey, we aimed to describe some opinions and attitudes of the Italian general population towards both influenza vaccination and the COVID-19 pandemic, and to identify potential modifiers of the decision-making process regarding the uptake of the 2020/21 influenza vaccine. A total of 2543 responses were analyzed. Although most (74.8%) participants valued influenza vaccination positively and declared that it should be mandatory, some misconceptions around influenza persist. The general practitioner was the main source of trusted information on influenza vaccines, while social networks were judged to be the least reliable. Younger and less affluent individuals, subjects not vaccinated in the previous season, and those living in smaller communities showed lower odds of receiving the 2020/21 season influenza vaccination. However, the COVID-19 pandemic may have positively influenced the propensity of being vaccinated against 2020/21 seasonal influenza. In order to increase influenza vaccination coverage rates multidisciplinary targeted interventions are needed. The role of general practitioners remains crucial in increasing influenza vaccine awareness and acceptance by effective counselling.

12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(16)2020 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-717733

ABSTRACT

During the Covid-19 pandemic, risk communication has often been ineffective, and from this perspective "fake news" has found fertile ground, both as a cause and a consequence of it. The aim of this study is to measure how much "fake news" and corresponding verified news have circulated in Italy in the period between 31 December 2019 and 30 April 2020, and to estimate the quality of informal and formal communication. We used the BuzzSumo application to gather the most shared links on the Internet related to the pandemic in Italy, using keywords chosen according to the most frequent "fake news" during that period. For each research we noted the numbers of "fake news" articles and science-based news articles, as well as the number of engagements. We reviewed 2102 articles. Links that contained fake news were shared 2,352,585 times, accounting for 23.1% of the total shares of all the articles reviewed. Our study throws light on the "fake news" phenomenon in the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. A quantitative assessment is fundamental in order to understand the impact of false information and to define political and technical interventions in health communication. Starting from this evaluation, health literacy should be improved by means of specific interventions in order to improve informal and formal communication.


Subject(s)
Communications Media/statistics & numerical data , Communications Media/standards , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Health Communication/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Vaccine ; 39(37): 5240-5250, 2021 08 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-624811

ABSTRACT

Given our global interconnectedness, the COVID-19 pandemic highlights the urgency of building a global system that can support both routine and pandemic/epidemic adult immunization. As such, a framework to recommend vaccines and build robust platforms to deliver them to protect the rapidly expanding demographic of older adults is needed. Adult immunization as a strategy has the broad potential to preserve and improve medical, social, and economic outcomes, including maintaining functional ability that benefits older adults, their families, communities, and countries. While we will soon have multiple vaccines against COVID-19, we must recognize that we already have a variety of vaccines against other pathogens that can keep adults healthier. They can prevent simultaneous co-infection with COVID-19, and may favorably impact- the outcome of a COVID-19 illness. Further, administering a vaccine against COVID-19 requires planning now to determine delivery strategies impacting how older adults will be immunized in a timely manner. A group of international experts with various backgrounds from health and aging disciplines met to discuss the evidence case for adult immunization and crucial knowledge gaps that must be filled in order to implement effective policies and programs for older adult immunization. This group, coming together as the International Council on Adult Immunization (ICAI), outlined a high-level roadmap to catalyze action, provide policy guidance, and envision a global adult immunization platform that can be adapted by countries to fit their local contexts. Further meetings centered around the value of adult immunization, particularly in the context of COVID-19. There was agreement that programs to deliver existing influenza, pneumococcal, herpes zoster vaccines, and future COVID-19 vaccines to over a billion older adults who are at substantially higher risk of death and disability due to vaccine-preventable diseases are more urgent than ever before. Here we present a proposed framework for delivering routine and pandemic vaccines. We call upon the global community and governments to prioritize action for integrating robust adult immunization programs into the public health agenda.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Vaccines , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunization , Immunization Programs , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
14.
Int J Infect Dis ; 98: 188-190, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609752

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 represents a major public health issue in Italy; estimating the size of the outbreak could direct public health policies and inform us of the extent of the reorganization needed in the healthcare system, the efficacy of quarantine measures, and eventually on the achievement of herd immunity. To chart the real extent of COVID-19 infection in Italy official data need to be interpreted, considering various aspects such as the "suspected-case" definition that changed during recent months, the management of asymptomatic and untested symptomatic cases, the system for reporting deaths, and short-term fluctuations. All these aspects should be considered when reflecting on the meaning of the official COVID-19 figures in Italy. Regionalization of the healthcare system and fragmentation of data represent real challenges in the management of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy. The authors' opinion is that transparent and accurate reporting could guide policy-making and help reorganize health services.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Public Health , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL