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1.
J Clin Med ; 11(14)2022 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1938853

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 may lead to a large spectrum of respiratory manifestations, including pulmonary sequelae. We conducted a single-center longitudinal study of survivors from severe COVID-19 cases who underwent a chest CT during hospitalization (CTH). Three months after being discharged, these patients were evaluated by a clinical examination, pulmonary function tests and a chest-CT scan (CTFU). Sixty-two patients were enrolled. At follow-up, 27% complained of exertional dyspnoea and 12% of cough. Dyspnoeic patients had a lower forced expiratory flow (FEF)25-75 (p = 0.015), while a CT scan (p = 0.016 showed that patients with cough had a higher extent of bronchiectasis. Lung volumes and diffusion of carbon monoxide (DLCO) at follow-up were lower in patients who had been invasively ventilated, which correlated inversely with the length of hospitalization and ground-glass extension at CTH. At follow-up, 14.5% of patients had a complete radiological resolution, while 85.5% presented persistence of ground-glass opacities, and 46.7% showed fibrotic-like alterations. Residual ground-glass at CTFU was related to the length of hospitalization (r = 0.48; p = 0.0002) and to the need for mechanical ventilation or high flow oxygen (p = 0.01) during the acute phase. In conclusion, although patients at three months from discharge showed functional impairment and radiological abnormalities, which correlated with a prolonged hospital stay and need for mechanical ventilation, the persistence of respiratory symptoms was related not to parenchymal but rather to airway sequelae.

2.
J Clin Med ; 10(21)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480814

ABSTRACT

Pneumothorax (PNX) and pneumomediastinum (PNM) are potential complications of COVID-19, but their influence on patients' outcomes remains unclear. The aim of the study was to assess incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of severe COVID-19 complicated with PNX/PNM. METHODS: A retrospective multicenter case-control analysis was conducted in COVID-19 patients admitted for respiratory failure in intermediate care units of the Treviso area, Italy, from March 2020 to April 2021. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of patients with and without PNX/PNM were compared. RESULTS: Among 1213 patients, PNX and/or PNM incidence was 4.5%. Among these, 42% had PNX and PNM, 33.5% only PNX, and 24.5% only PNM. COVID-19 patients with PNX/PNM showed higher in-hospital (p = 0.02) and 90-days mortality (p = 0.048), and longer hospitalization length (p = 0.002) than COVID-19 patients without PNX/PNM. At PNX/PNM occurrence, one-third of subjects was not mechanically ventilated, and the respiratory support was similar to the control group. PNX/PNM occurrence was associated with longer symptom length before hospital admission (p = 0.005) and lower levels of blood lymphocytes (p = 0.017). CONCLUSION: PNX/PNM are complications of COVID-19 associated with a worse prognosis in terms of mortality and length of hospitalization. Although they are more frequent in ventilated patients, they can occur in non-ventilated, suggesting that mechanisms other than barotrauma might contribute to their presentation.

3.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 714570, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374237

ABSTRACT

The impact that COVID-19 could have on patients with COPD is a real concern. In this study we evaluated, in a cohort of longitudinally followed COPD subjects, the incidence of COVID-19, seeking for possible risk factors and prognostic factors predicting the clinical outcome. In our cohort of 370 patients (followed for 5.3 ± 2.7 years), 22 developed COVID-19 (COPD/COVID-19+) between February/November 2020 (5.9%). Cardio-metabolic conditions (hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, diabetes) but not respiratory abnormalities (FEV1, DLCO, emphysema and exacerbation history), were risk factors for development of COVID-19 in COPD patients. Out of the 22 COPD/COVID-19+ patients, 10 needed intensive care. Low DLCO and emphysema, but also metabolic comorbidities, were related to the need for intensive care.

4.
Neurosci Lett ; 748: 135694, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188917

ABSTRACT

Patients with COVID-19 often complain of smell and taste disorders (STD). STD emerge early in the course of the disease, seem to be more common in SARS-CoV-2 infection than in other upper respiratory tract infections, and could in some cases persist for long after resolution of respiratory symptoms. Current evidence suggests that STD probably result from a loss of function of olfactory sensory neurons and taste buds, mainly caused by infection, inflammation, and subsequent dysfunction of supporting non-neuronal cells in the mucosa. However, the possible occurrence of other mechanisms leading to chemosensory dysfunction has also been hypothesized, and contrasting data have been reported regarding the direct infection of sensory neurons by SARS-CoV-2. In this mini-review, we summarize the currently available literature on pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and outcomes of STD in COVID-19 and discuss possible future directions of research on this topic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Olfaction Disorders/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Taste Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mouth Mucosa/immunology , Mouth Mucosa/pathology , Olfaction Disorders/diagnosis , Olfaction Disorders/epidemiology , Olfaction Disorders/physiopathology , Olfactory Mucosa/immunology , Olfactory Mucosa/pathology , Olfactory Receptor Neurons/immunology , Olfactory Receptor Neurons/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Smell/physiology , Taste/physiology , Taste Buds/immunology , Taste Buds/pathology , Taste Disorders/diagnosis , Taste Disorders/epidemiology , Taste Disorders/physiopathology
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(24)2020 12 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a six-month home-based resistance-training program on muscle health and physical performance in healthy older subjects during the unique condition of home confinement caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This was a randomized-controlled study that enrolled older participants that were allocated to either an experimental group performing the six-months exercise prescription (EXE) or a control group (CON). At the beginning (PRE), and after 6 months (POST), participants were assessed for muscle strength, balance, gait assessment and body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging. Normality distribution of data was checked with the D'Agostino and Pearson test and changes between PRE and POST were assessed by paired Student's t-test while percentage and absolute changes between groups at POST were tested by unpaired t-test. RESULTS: Nine participants were included for the final analysis: EXE, n = 5 (age: 66 ± 4; BMI: 27.5 ± 3.7) and CON, n = 4 (age: 71 ± 9; BMI: 24.2 ± 4.1). Significant PRE-to-POST changes were observed in the EXE group only in the chair-stand test (+19.8%, p = 0.048 and ES:1.0, moderate) and in total fat mass (+5.0%, p = 0.035 and ES:1.4, large) with no between-group differences. Moreover, EXE had significantly higher absolute thigh CSA values than CON at POST (14.138 ± 2977 vs. 9039 ± 1015, p = 0.0178, ES = 1.7). No other within- and between-group differences were detected. CONCLUSIONS: The home-based resistance-training program during the lockdown period, caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, determined only within-group improvement in lower limb muscle strength but not in muscle mass and composition in older subjects. Home confinement may partially explain the increase in total body fat due to a reduced daily PA regime and altered diet pattern.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Muscle Strength , Resistance Training , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Composition , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics
6.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 17(24):9533, 2020.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-984927

ABSTRACT

Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a six-month home-based resistance-training program on muscle health and physical performance in healthy older subjects during the unique condition of home confinement caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods. This was a randomized-controlled study that enrolled older participants that were allocated to either an experimental group performing the six-months exercise prescription (EXE) or a control group (CON). At the beginning (PRE), and after 6 months (POST), participants were assessed for muscle strength, balance, gait assessment and body composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and magnetic resonance imaging. Normality distribution of data was checked with the D’Agostino and Pearson test and changes between PRE and POST were assessed by paired Student’s t-test while percentage and absolute changes between groups at POST were tested by unpaired t-test. Results. Nine participants were included for the final analysis: EXE, n = 5 (age: 66 ±4;BMI: 27.5 ±3.7) and CON, n = 4 (age: 71 ±9;BMI: 24.2 ±4.1). Significant PRE-to-POST changes were observed in the EXE group only in the chair-stand test (+19.8%, p = 0.048 and ES:1.0, moderate) and in total fat mass (+5.0%, p = 0.035 and ES:1.4, large) with no between-group differences. Moreover, EXE had significantly higher absolute thigh CSA values than CON at POST (14.138 ±2977 vs. 9039 ±1015, p = 0.0178, ES = 1.7). No other within- and between-group differences were detected. Conclusions. The home-based resistance-training program during the lockdown period, caused by the COVID-19 outbreak, determined only within-group improvement in lower limb muscle strength but not in muscle mass and composition in older subjects. Home confinement may partially explain the increase in total body fat due to a reduced daily PA regime and altered diet pattern.

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