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1.
International Journal of Preventive Medicine ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2033971

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are considered at higher risk of COVID-19 infection due to treatment with immune modulators and immune-suppressive agents. The exact risk factors are not clear. So, we aimed to conduct a study to determine the predictors of catching COVID-19 infection during the pandemic stage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We conducted a multicenter screening study and developed an online questionnaire to collect patients’ self-reported demographic features along with MS-related and COVID-19–related information. The online questionnaire link was released by the Iran Multiple Sclerosis Society (IMSS) social media channel, accessible for 4160 MS patients totally and also was sent by WhatsApp for nonmember cases. Results: Totally, 1448 MS patients participated in our study. Twenty-five (1.7%) patients were diagnosed with COVID-19, from which 4 were hospitalized, 4 were treated with medical therapy, and 17 patients had home-quarantine. The patients with COVID-19 diagnosis were more frequently treated with rituximab (28% vs 24%, P = 0.001) than others, and cardiovascular comorbidity was more frequent in this group (8% vs 1.6%, P = 0.01). Regression analysis showed that cardiovascular disease was a significant positive predictor of COVID-19 infection (OR = 5.2, 95% CI: 1.1–23.7). Conclusions: Patients with MS who have cardiovascular disease should be more monitored for COVID-19 infection as they are at higher risk of infection.

2.
International Journal of Preventive Medicine ; 13(7):1-5, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1975097

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) are considered at higher risk of COVID-19 infection due to treatment with immune modulators and immune-suppressive agents. The exact risk factors are not clear. So, we aimed to conduct a study to determine the predictors of catching COVID-19 infection during the pandemic stage in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We conducted a multicenter screening study and developed an online questionnaire to collect patients' self-reported demographic features along with MS-related and COVID-19-related information. The online questionnaire link was released by the Iran Multiple Sclerosis Society (IMSS) social media channel, accessible for 4160 MS patients totally and also was sent by WhatsApp for nonmember cases. Results: Totally, 1448 MS patients participated in our study. Twenty-five (1.7%) patients were diagnosed with COVID-19, from which 4 were hospitalized, 4 were treated with medical therapy, and 17 patients had home-quarantine. The patients with COVID-19 diagnosis were more frequently treated with rituximab (28% vs 24%, P = 0.001) than others, and cardiovascular comorbidity was more frequent in this group (8% vs 1.6%, P = 0.01). Regression analysis showed that cardiovascular disease was a significant positive predictor of COVID-19 infection (OR = 5.2, 95% CI: 1.1-23.7). Conclusions: Patients with MS who have cardiovascular disease should be more monitored for COVID-19 infection as they are at higher risk of infection. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Preventive Medicine is the property of Wolters Kluwer India Pvt Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

3.
Mult Scler ; : 13524585221102918, 2022 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1902303

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) treated with anti-CD20 or fingolimod showed a reduced humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. OBJECTIVE: In this study we aimed to monitor the risk of breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection in pwMS on different disease-modifying therapies (DMTs). METHODS: Data on the number of vaccinated patients and the number of patients with a breakthrough infection were retrospectively collected in 27 Italian MS centers. We estimated the rate of breakthrough infections and of infection requiring hospitalization per DMT. RESULTS: 19,641 vaccinated pwMS were included in the database. After a median follow-up of 8 months, we observed 137 breakthrough infections. Compared with other DMTs, the rate of breakthrough infections was significantly higher on ocrelizumab (0.57% vs 2.00%, risk ratio (RR) = 3.55, 95% CI = 2.74-4.58, p < 0.001) and fingolimod (0.58% vs 1.62%, RR = 2.65, 95% CI = 1.75-4.00, p < 0.001), while there were no significant differences in any other DMT group. In the ocrelizumab group the hospitalization rate was 16.7% versus 19.4% in the pre-vaccination era (RR = 0.86, p = 0.74) and it was 3.9% in all the other DMT groups versus 11.9% in the pre-vaccination period (RR = 0.33, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infections is higher in patients treated with ocrelizumab and fingolimod, and the rate of severe infections was significantly reduced in all the DMTs excluding ocrelizumab.

4.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 63: 103888, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851848

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The present cross-national study addressed the relationship among three pandemic-related variables and multiple sclerosis (MS) disability outcomes among people with MS in Italy and the United States (US). METHODS: This cross-sectional web-based study was administered to 708 patients with MS from the US and Italy in late Spring through mid-Summer of 2020. Pandemic-related variables assessed worry, self-protection, and post-traumatic growth. The Performance Scales© assessed MS disability. Multivariate multiple regression models addressed, separately by country, the relationship among worry, protection, and post-traumatic growth with MS disability, after covariate adjustment. RESULTS: The Italian sample (n = 292) was younger and less disabled than the US group (n = 416). After covariate adjustment, all three pandemic-related variables were associated with MS disability outcomes in the US sample, but only worry and post-traumatic growth were associated in the Italian sample. Worse cognitive and depression symptoms were associated with worry, and lesser mobility disability was associated with endorsed growth in both countries. More disability variables were associated with worry and growth in the Italian sample. CONCLUSIONS: The pandemic's negative aspects were associated with worse disability in both countries, and reported post-traumatic growth was associated with lesser disability. These findings may suggest directions for clinical intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/psychology , United States/epidemiology
5.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327079

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) treated with anti-CD20 or fingolimod showed a reduced humoral response to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. In this study we aimed to monitor the risk of breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infection in pwMS on different Disease Modifying Therapy (DMT). Methods. Data on number of vaccinated patients and of patients with a breakthrough infection were retrospectively collected in 27 Italian MS centers. We estimated the rate of breakthrough infections and of infection requiring hospitalization per DMT. Findings. 19641 vaccinated pwMS were included in the database. After a median follow-up of 8 months, we observed 137 breakthrough infections. As compared to the other DMTs, the rate of breakthrough infections was significantly higher on ocrelizumab (0.57% vs 2.00%, RR=3.55,95%CI=2.74-4.58, p<0.001) and fingolimod (0.58% vs 1.62%, RR=2.65,95%CI=1.75-4.00, p<0.001), while there were no significant differences in any other DMT group. In the ocrelizumab group the hospitalization rate was 16.7% vs 19.4% in the pre-vaccination era (RR=0.86,p=0.74) and it was 3.9% in all the other DMT groups vs 11.9% in the pre-vaccination period (RR=0.33,p=0.02). Interpretation. The risk of breakthrough SARS-CoV-2 infections is higher in patients treated with ocrelizumab and fingolimod, and the rate of severe infections was significantly reduced in all the DMTs excluding ocrelizumab.

6.
Neurol Sci ; 43(2): 1007-1014, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669827

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the concordance between Google Maps® application (GM®) and clinical practice measurements of ambulatory function (e.g., Ambulation Score (AS) and respective Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)) in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional multicenter study. AS and EDSS were calculated using GM® and routine clinical methods; the correspondence between the two methods was assessed. A multinomial logistic model is investigated which demographic (age, sex) and clinical features (e.g., disease subtype, fatigue, depression) might have influenced discrepancies between the two methods. RESULTS: Two hundred forty-three pwMS were included; discrepancies in AS and in EDDS assessments between GM® and routine clinical methods were found in 81/243 (33.3%) and 74/243 (30.4%) pwMS, respectively. Progressive phenotype (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-7.11, p = 0.03), worse fatigue (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 1.01-1.06, p = 0.01), and more severe depression (OR = 1.1; 95% CI 1.04-1.17, p = 0.002) were associated with discrepancies between GM® and routine clinical scoring. CONCLUSION: GM® could easily be used in a real-life clinical setting to calculate the AS and the related EDSS scores. GM® should be considered for validation in further clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Multiple Sclerosis , Search Engine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis
7.
Neurological sciences : official journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology ; : 1-7, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1652314

ABSTRACT

Background Migraine affects more than a billion people all over the world and requires critical employment of healthcare resources. Telemedicine could be a reasonable tool to manage people suffering from headaches, and it received a big push from the COVID-19 pandemic. Objective This review aims to propose a practical approach for the virtual management of these patients. Methods To do this, we conducted a literature search, including 32 articles relevant to the topic treated in this review. Results The most challenging step in telemedicine applied to practical neurology remains the clinical assessment, but through a careful headache history and a recently proposed entirely virtual neurological assessment, this hitch can be easily overcome. Electronic diary compilations and virtual administration of disability-measuring scales, conversely, are the key features of effective long-term follow-up although we do not have apps that met the criteria of scientific reliability. Furthermore, tele-rehabilitation seems to be effective and has demonstrated to be a solution to alternatively treat chronic patients at home, and can be considered part of the remote management of headache patients. Moreover, virtual management of headaches finds an application in specific communities of patients, as pediatric patients and for rural communities of low- and middle-income countries suffer from health disparities, with inadequate resources and knowledge gaps. Conclusion Telemedicine could be promising for patients with no regular or convenient access to headache specialists and seems to be a priority in managing migraine patients to avoid non-urgent hospitalizations

8.
Neurol Sci ; 43(5): 2935-2942, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653539

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Stress is a potential trigger for clinical and radiological activity in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). COVID-19 pandemic has been a relevant source of mental distress in people with MS (pwMS) and deeply impacted on disease management. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between stress, anxiety, depression, and risk of relapse during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: From an electronic database used for clinical practice, we extracted data of relapsing-remitting (RR) or relapsing-progressive (RP) MS patients and calculated the annualized relapse rate (ARR) during 2019 and 2020. From 01/12/2020 to 30/12/2020, enrolled patients were invited to fill in a Google Forms survey to investigate depression, anxiety, stress, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). RESULTS: We selected 216 patients with RR or RP-MS to calculate ARR: compared to 2019, in 2020 there was a significant increase in ARR (p = 0.0142). Over 216 selected pwMS, 154 completed the survey. Matching the survey responses and incidence of relapses in 2020, there was a significant association between relapses and stress (p = 0.030) and relapses and depression (p = 0.011), but not between relapses and anxiety (p = 0.130) or PTSD (p = 0.279). CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the hypothesis that pandemic-related stress is associated to clinical exacerbations, both as a possible consequence of the COVID-19 impact on MS care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting , Multiple Sclerosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis, Chronic Progressive/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/complications , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/epidemiology , Pandemics , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3375-3383, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In multiple sclerosis (MS), disease-related factors and dysfunctional coping might favor the development of mental distress induced by COVID-19 containment measures. Aim of this study was exploring the relationship between disability, coping strategies, daily life reorganization and neuropsychiatric symptoms in an Italian MS population during the COVID-19 lockdown, in order to identify potentially modifiable factors that could inform clinical management of mental distress in people with MS. METHODS: We explored the relationship between mental distress, disability and coping strategies in the Italian MS population under lockdown. Structural equation modeling was applied to information collected via web survey to identify modifiable factors that could account for mental distress. RESULTS: A total of 845 participants (497 with MS and 348 controls) were included in the study. The MS group had higher scores than the control group for depression (p = 0.005), but not for anxiety, emotional dyscontrol or sleep disturbances. The structural equation modeling explained 74% of the variance observed in depression score. Within the model, three latent factors were characterized from measured variables: motor disability and cognitive dysfunction contributed to disability (ß = 0.509 and ß = 0.836; p < 0.001); positive attitude and exercise contributed to active attitude (ß = 0.386 and ß = 0.297; p < 0.001); and avoidance, social support and watching television contributed to passive attitude (ß = 0.301, ß = 0.243 and ß = 0.212; p < 0.001). With regard to the relationship between latent factors and their influence on depression, disability contributed to passive attitude (ß = 0.855; p < 0.001), while both passive and active attitude significantly influenced depression (ß = 0.729 and ß = -0.456; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: As a practical implication of our model, favoring exercise would enhance active attitude and its positive impact on mental well-being while, at the same time, reducing the negative impact of disability on depression, representing a valuable tool in facing COVID-19-related mental distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Motor Disorders , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3396-3402, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The COVID-19 emergency may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and with regard to people with MS (pwMS) chronic exposure to a wide range of challenging life events has been shown to be correlated with worsening of neurological symptoms, increased lesion burden on brain magnetic resonance imaging and relapses. The aim was to investigate perceived stress, depression, perceived social support, habits and behaviour changes in pwMS through COVID-19 in comparison to a control group. METHODS: A web-based survey was posted on SMsocialnetwork.com to investigate perceived stress (using the Perceived Stress Scale), depression (with Patient Health Questionnaire 2) and perceived social support (using Social Provision Scale 10 item) in pwMS and a control group through the COVID-19 pandemic. A secondary group of people with migraine was investigated. RESULTS: In all, 1286 answers from 612 pwMS and 674 control people were included in the final analysis. The answers from 318 people with migraine were included for a secondary analysis. A higher proportion of pwMS were depressed (43.1% vs. 23.1%; p < 0.001), had a high level of perceived stress (58% vs. 39.8%; p < 0.001) and felt significantly less social support (median 33 vs. 35; Q1-Q3 28-36 vs. 32-37; p < 0.001) compared to the control group. A higher percentage of people with migraine were depressed (50% vs. 43%, p = 0.04) compared to pwMS. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the negative impact that prolonged stress may have on clinical and radiological disease activity of pwMS, and bearing in mind that a beneficial effect has been demonstrated and achieved with stress management, it is suggested to promote stress control in these patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
11.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291064

ABSTRACT

Objective: To explore, through a digital triage monitoring, the frequency of demographic and clinical characteristics suggestive for COVID-19 among two large samples of people with Multiple Sclerosis (pwMS) and to evaluate the association between demographic and clinical characteristics of pwMS and the likelihood of being identified as COVID-19 suspect. Methods: : A Google Forms triage was e-mailed to 3500 pwMS. pwMS suspects for having COVID-19 were: A) patients who reported recent contact with a patient with suspicion or diagnosis of COVID-19 and the presence of at least one symptom suggestive of COVID-19;B) pwMS with at least two symptoms suggestive of COVID-19. Demographics, clinical characteristics, and DMT categories of COVID-19-suspect vs non-suspect pwMS were compared. Results: : 1035/1500 questionnaires were fulfilled by Italian pwMS and 1346/2000 by Iranian patients. 4.9% of Iranian and 1,5% of Italian pwMS met our criteria for the COVID-19-suspect case. Only diabetes and heart disease (OR: 5,374, 95%CI: 2,470 – 11,985, p-value<0.001) were independently associated with the likelihood of being suspect for COVID-19. Conclusion: The results of a digital triage system applied to a large Italian-Iranian population of pwMS to identify suspect cases of COVID-19 were discussed. Demographic and clinical characteristics of pwMS suspect for COVID-19 and the factors influencing the likelihood of being COVID-19 suspect are comparable to those of previous studies. Therefore, we encourage the use of the digital triage in patients with this chronic and severely disabling disease to pinpoint suspect case of COVID-19 in order to promptly activate the second phase of the intervention.

12.
Journal of the Neurological Sciences ; 429:N.PAG-N.PAG, 2021.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1461508
13.
Neurol Sci ; 42(12): 4889-4892, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1372796

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has induced an urgent reorganization of the healthcare system to ensure continuity of care for patients affected by chronic neurological diseases including myasthenia gravis (MG). Due to the fluctuating nature of the disease, early detection of disease worsening, adverse events, and possibly life-threatening complications is mandatory. This work analyzes the main unresolved issues in the management of the myasthenic patient, the possibilities offered so far by digital technologies, and proposes an online evaluation protocol based on 4 simple tests to improve MG management. Telemedicine and Digital Technology might help neurologists in the clinical decision-making process of MG management, avoiding unnecessary in presence consultations and allowing a rational use of the time and space reduced by the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myasthenia Gravis , Telemedicine , Humans , Myasthenia Gravis/diagnosis , Myasthenia Gravis/epidemiology , Myasthenia Gravis/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Expert Rev Neurother ; 21(7): 731-743, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313709

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Covid-19 has been sweeping over the world for more than a year. People with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) might be particularly vulnerable either for the disease iteself or for the ongoing immune treatment. The aim of this review is to understand the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and lockdown on patients with MS and to provide evidence-based advice to ensure them a high standard of care even during the pandemic. AREAS COVERED: Literature search was conducted in the Scopus, Web of Science, Pubmed electronic databases, and articles reference lists to investigate the effect of Covid-19 on MS patients' treatment, access to health-care services and mental-health.The search terms 'multiple sclerosis' AND 'Covid-19' were combined with each of the following term 'disease modifying treatment,' 'steroids,' 'vaccination,' 'mental health,' 'stress,' 'quality of life,' 'management,' 'impact,' 'recommendations,'. EXPERT OPINION: To ensure MS control during the pandemic, minimizing the risk of Covid-19 contagion, face-to-face visits may be implemented with televisits. Management of relapses and DMTs schedule should be adapted based on the specific benefit/risk ratio for each patient, considering disease activity, disability, comorbidities. Vaccination should be strongly recommended. Telerehabilitation and online psychological support programs should be encouraged to preserve motor performances and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Neurol Sci ; 42(9): 3553-3559, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281287

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 pandemic radically transformed our daily clinical practice, raising the need not to lose close contact with patients without being able to see them face-to-face. These issues are even more felt and evident in fragile patients, as those affected by neuromuscular disease. An important help came from new digital technologies that allow clinicians to remotely monitor health status and any deterioration of chronically ill patients. METHODS: In this mini-review, an initiative of the "Digital Technologies, Web and Social Media Study Group" of the Italian Society of Neurology, we propose to analyze the approach to neuromuscular patients by looking over raising evidence on the main cornerstones of Telemedicine (TM): clinician-patient interaction, remote clinical assessment, remote monitoring, and digital therapeutics. In particular, we explored the strategies developed by researchers and their impact on the physical and emotional status of the patients, with particular focusing on their adherence to the program of virtual monitoring. RESULTS: TM plays an important role in each of four stages of approach to neuromuscular disease, having demonstrated validity in keep close clinical patient interaction, clinical assessment, remote monitoring, and telerehabilitation. Nevertheless, there is no remote alternative to electrophysiological testing neither validate tools to assess disability. CONCLUSION: The role of TM in neuromuscular care is yet underestimated but is crucial, beyond the pandemic era. Further development of TM is advisable, through making specific apps, remotely controlled by clinicians, and making more engaging clinicians-patients interaction. Last, it is necessary to ensure adequate internet access to everyone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromuscular Diseases , Telemedicine , Humans , Neuromuscular Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Clin Med ; 10(6)2021 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136516

ABSTRACT

Physical disability impacts psychosocial wellbeing in people with multiple sclerosis. However, the role of physical activity in this context is still debated. By taking advantage of a previous survey, conducted online from 22 April to 7 May 2020, we performed a post-hoc analysis with the aim to assess the associations between disability, physical exercise, and mental health in multiple sclerosis. We retrieved the following data: (i) sociodemographic information, (ii) changes in lifestyle (including exercise), (iii) physical disability, as measured with the Patient-Determined Disease Steps scale, and (iv) anxiety feelings and depressive symptoms assessed via the items included in the Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders measurement system. Examination of the interaction plot showed that the effect of disability on depression, but not on anxious symptoms, was significant for all levels of physical exercise (low: b = 1.22, 95% C.I. 0.85, 1.58, p < 0.001; moderate: b = 0.95, 95% C.I. 0.66, 1.24, p < 0.001; and high: b = 0.68, 95% C.I. 0.24, 1.13, p = 0.003). Based on these data, we can conclude that disability significantly impacted depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, with physical activity playing a moderating role. Our results suggest that favoring exercise in multiple sclerosis (MS) would ameliorate psychological wellbeing regardless of the level of physical disability.

17.
Neurol Sci ; 42(1): 9-13, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064520

ABSTRACT

Over the last months, due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, containment measures have led to important social restriction. Healthcare systems have faced a complete rearrangement of resources and spaces, with the creation of wards devoted to COVID-19 patients. In this context, patients affected by chronic neurological diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), are at risk to be lost at follow-up, leading to a higher risk of morbidity and mortality. Telemedicine may allow meet the needs of these patients. In this commentary, we briefly discuss the digital tools to remotely monitor and manage ALS patients. Focusing on detecting disease progression and preventing life-threatening conditions, we propose a toolset able to improve ALS management during this unprecedented situation.


Subject(s)
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/diagnosis , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/therapy , COVID-19 , Monitoring, Ambulatory , Severity of Illness Index , Telemedicine , Humans
18.
Neurol Sci ; 42(3): 805-809, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023328

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The pandemic has implemented the need for new digital technologies as useful tools during the emergency and the long recovery phase that will follow. SARS-CoV-2 has strongly impacted stroke care with significant contraction in a number of patients treated. METHODS: This mini-review is an initiative of the "Digital Technologies, Web and Social Media Study Group" of the Italian Society of Neurology and briefly discusses digital tools for managing the acute phase and the rehabilitation after stroke, even considering the new apps that will improve the process of remote monitoring of patients after discharge at home. RESULTS: Telemedicine and digital technologies could play a role in each of the three stroke-belt stages: hyperacute treatment and reperfusion, acute care, etiological classification and secondary prevention and rehabilitation. CONCLUSION: The global emergency represented by the COVID-19 pandemic can be the stimulus to accelerate the digitalization process in the field of stroke for the use of new methods on a large scale.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology/methods , Stroke Rehabilitation/methods , Stroke , Telemedicine/methods , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/diagnosis , Stroke/therapy
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