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1.
Pandemic Outbreaks in the 21st Century: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Prevention, and Treatment ; : 11-24, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1803300

ABSTRACT

Over the year 2020, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) impact, caused by the Severe Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, has been highly significant in the world. As expected, resource-constrained areas of the world, as is the case of Latin America, have been more affected given their previous epidemiological context, health care systems, and socioeconomic conditions. In this chapter the main epidemiological features of the COVID-19 during the first year of the pandemic in this region are revised. © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2.
Journal of Pure and Applied Microbiology ; 14(Suppl. 1):709-712, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1395563

ABSTRACT

Bats are the only flying mammals that carry multiple pathogens, such as the SARS-CoV-2. As a consequent of fear of the zoonotic origin of SARS-CoV-2, there is an adverse reaction in multiple countries against these animals. Bats contribute with arthropod control and pollination, among other positive roles of these animals.

3.
Journal of Pure and Applied Microbiology ; 14(Suppl. 1):703-708, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1395562

ABSTRACT

With the growing evidence of cases and studies showing natural and experimental infection due to SARS-CoV-2 in felines, including cats, lion, and tigers, there is also an increasing concern about its susceptibility and their role in urban cycles of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, initially from humans-to-animals, but with uncertainty about reverse transmission. In this review, we addressed the evidence around this situation.

4.
Infez Med ; 29(2):181-190, 2021.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1248641

ABSTRACT

In recent years, and now especially with the arrival of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), there has been increased interest in understanding the role of bats in the dynamics of transmission and origin of this pandemic agent. To date, no systematic reviews have been published on this topic. This systematic review aimed to summarize and highlight the frequency of bat infections reported in currently available observational studies for coronavirus. The purpose of this study was also to examine the differences between the pool prevalence by technique and country. We performed a systematic literature review with meta-analysis, using three databases to assess coronavirus (CoV) infection in bats and its diagnosis by serological and molecular tests. We carried out random-effects model meta-analysis to calculate the pooled prevalence and 95% confidence interval (95% CI). In all, 824 articles were retrieved (1960-2021). After screening by abstract/title, 43 articles were selected for full-text assessment. Of these, 33 were finally included for qualitative and quantitative analyses. From the total of studies, the pool prevalence by RT-PCR (n=14,295 bats) for CoV was 9.8% (95% CI 8.7-10.9%);Italy reported the highest pooled prevalence (44.9%, 95% CI 31.6-58.1%), followed by the Philippines (29.6%). Regarding the ELISA, the pool prevalence for coronavirus from 15 studies, including 359 bats, was 30.2% (95% CI 14.7-45.6%). The results for coronaviruses with the MIF were significantly lower, 2.6% (95% CI 1.5-3.7%). A considerable proportion of infected bats tested positive, particularly by molecular tests. This essential condition highlights the relevance of bats and the need for future studies to detail their role as potential reservoirs of SARS-CoV-2. In this meta-analysis, bats were positive in almost 10% by RT-PCR, suggesting their relevance and the need to understand their potential participation in maintaining wild zoonotic transmission.

5.
Le infezioni in medicina ; 28(4):475-485, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-970405

ABSTRACT

While the world is focused on attending, controlling, and mitigating the current pandemic of COVID-19, caused by the SARS-CoV-2, other viral threats are possibly emerging and reemerging especially in Asia, posing a risk for the spread in that region and beyond. A predictable threat is the avian influenza virus, especially H5N6, which has recently led to significant outbreaks in China and the Philippines, deserving more attention and control. In the current review, we assess the history of this highly pathogenic reemerging virus, as well as the contemporary implications of poultry outbreaks occurring in some Asian countries. We also look at outbreaks due to other strains not only in Asia but also across Europe and Africa, according to recent reports from the World Organization of Animal Health (OIE).

7.
Advances in Animal and Veterinary Sciences ; 8(3):234-237, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-822918
8.
General & Internal Medicine ; 2020(Revista Del Cuerpo Medico Del Hospital Nacional Almanzor Aguinaga Asenjo)
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1100510
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