Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
2.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S389-S390, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1565031

ABSTRACT

Background The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has thus far resulted in substantial worldwide mortality. As of November 2020, COVID-19 vaccines became available following Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) issued by the FDA. Recent longitudinal studies published as of March 2021 demonstrated that vaccine hesitancy remains high despite improvements compared to 2020. This study sought to explore the perceptions, beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge surrounding COVID-19 and identify determinants uniquely associated with vaccine hesitancy. Methods A cross-sectional electronic survey was created based on CDC & IDSA recommendations. The survey was distributed from March 2021 until June 2021 randomly to faculty members, healthcare workers, and students (≥18 years old) across 3 major academic centers (Case Western Reserve University, Spectrum Health, and the American University of Beirut Medical Center [AUBMC]). Data collected included socio-economic characteristics, demographics, knowledge, and attitudes pertaining to COVID-19 and vaccination. A multivariable regression model was utilized to evaluate for independent associations between variables and vaccination willingness/hesitancy as the primary outcome. Results In total, 7,197 participants completed the survey with an overall response rate of 94%. Females constituted 75.7% of the study population. Overall, 87.8% of the study cohort indicated willingness to get vaccinated. Factors associated independently with vaccination hesitancy included: younger age, lower attained education, lower knowledge score, physician recommendation against vaccination, not receiving the influenza vaccine annually, and other beliefs and attitudes as reported in table 1. Table 1. Independent predictors of COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among study respondents Conclusion Most survey respondents indicated willingness to receive COVID-19 vaccination. The perception or belief that vaccination is more harmful than COVID-19 disease represented an especially robust barrier against vaccination. Since recommendations made by healthcare providers were strongly associated with either vaccination hesitancy or willingness to get vaccinated, developing educational strategies at this level could enhance vaccine acceptance in an effort to curb the pandemic. Disclosures Robert A. Bonomo, MD, entasis (Research Grant or Support)Merck (Grant/Research Support)NIH (Grant/Research Support)VA Merit Award (Grant/Research Support)VenatoRx (Grant/Research Support)

3.
Front Nutr ; 8: 672390, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403495

ABSTRACT

The significant stressors brought about and exacerbated by COVID-19 are associated with startling surges in mental health illnesses, specifically those related to depressive disorders. Given the huge impact of depression on society, and an incomplete understanding of impactful therapeutics, we have examined the current literature surrounding the microbiome and gut-brain axis to advance a potential complementary approach to address depression and depressive disorders that have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. While we understand that the impact of the human gut microbiome on emotional health is a newly emerging field and more research needs to be conducted, the current evidence is extremely promising and suggests at least part of the answer to understanding depression in more depth may lie within the microbiome. As a result of these findings, we propose that a microbiome-based holistic approach, which involves carefully annotating the microbiome and potential modification through diet, probiotics, and lifestyle changes, may address depression. This paper's primary purpose is to shed light on the link between the gut microbiome and depression, including the gut-brain axis and propose a holistic approach to microbiome modification, with the ultimate goal of assisting individuals to manage their battle with depression through diet, probiotics, and lifestyle changes, in addition to offering a semblance of hope during these challenging times.

4.
Pathog Immun ; 6(1): 135-156, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346785

ABSTRACT

In this review, we summarize the current status of nucleic acid and antigen testing required for diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 disease. Nucleic acid amplification (NAAT) and antigen-detection (Ag) tests occupy a critically important frontline of defense against SARS-CoV-2 in clinical and public health settings. In early stages of this outbreak, we observed that identifying the causative agent of a new illness of unknown origin was greatly accelerated by characterizing the nucleic acid signature of the novel coronavirus. Results from nucleic acid sequencing led to the development of highly sensitive RT-PCR testing for use in clinical settings and to informing best practices for patient care, and in public health settings to the development of strategies for protecting populations. As the current COVID-19 pandemic has evolved, we have seen how NAAT performance has been used to guide and optimize specimen collection, inform patient triage decisions, reveal unexpected clinical symptoms, clarify risks of transmission within patient care facilities, and guide appropriate treatment strategies. For public health settings during the earliest stages of the pandemic, NAATs served as the only tool available for studying the epidemiology of this new disease by identifying infected individuals, studying transmission patterns, modeling population impacts, and enabling disease control organizations and governments to make challenging disease mitigation recommendations to protect the expanding breadth of populations at risk. With time, the nucleic acid signature has provided the information necessary to understand SARS-CoV-2 protein expression for further development of antigen-based point-of-care (POC) diagnostic tests. The advent of massive parallel sequencing (ie, next generation sequencing) has afforded the characterization of this novel pathogen, informed the sequences best adapted for RT-PCR assays, guided vaccine production, and is currently used for tracking and monitoring SARS-CoV-2 variants.

5.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 22(1): e28-e34, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305331

ABSTRACT

Due to their superior tolerability and efficacy, ß-lactams are the most potent and prescribed class of antibiotics in the clinic. The emergence of resistance to those antibiotics, mainly due to the production of bacterial enzymes called ß-lactamases, has been partially solved by the introduction of ß-lactamase inhibitors, which restore the activity of otherwise obsolete molecules. This solution is limited because currently available ß-lactamase inhibitors only work against serine ß-lactamases, whereas metallo-ß-lactamases continue to spread, evolve, and confer resistance to all ß-lactams, including carbapenems. Furthermore, the increased use of antibiotics to treat secondary bacterial pneumonia in severely sick patients with COVID-19 might exacerbate the problem of antimicrobial resistance. In this Personal View, we summarise the main advances accomplished in this area of research, emphasise the main challenges that need to be solved, and the importance of research on inhibitors for metallo-B-lactamases amidst the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacteria/drug effects , Drug Resistance, Bacterial , Global Health , beta-Lactamase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , beta-Lactams/pharmacology , Bacteria/enzymology , Bacteria/pathogenicity , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/microbiology , Humans
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL