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Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 106(Suppl 3):A41, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1573901

ABSTRACT

BackgroundWith the extensive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent government interventions on the development, diagnosis and treatment of illnesses, building an understanding of ‘typical’ diagnosis trends at GOSH is critical for predicting future demands and potential clinical challenges. Seasonality analysis is an effective method with which one can explore, model and predict the occurrence of events over time when – as with many common diagnoses at GOSH – they generally exhibit a periodic trend over the year.MethodsTo investigate diagnosis seasonality at GOSH, we have extracted all diagnoses recorded in the Legacy and Epic systems, since the year 2010. We have developed an analytics pipeline that uses these data to compute historical rates for any given diagnosis, or group of diagnoses. Based on these diagnosis rates, our pipeline applies a widely used regressive, multiplicative, seasonal decomposition model with integrated model evaluation.ResultsFor the analysis, a total of 3,480,887 diagnosis events were considered across 29,529 patients between receiving a diagnosis between 1stJanuary 2010 and 30th September 2021. This exploration presents data on many of the common diagnoses at GOSH that exhibit a clear seasonal trend in combination with a statistically significant deviation from that trend since March 2020, likely due to the pandemic. In addition, we illustrate how the available data and model allow us to predict the diagnostic shortfall during the same period.

2.
BMJ Paediatr Open ; 5(1): e001210, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1571209

ABSTRACT

In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in London on paediatric radiology activity, as a surrogate of overall hospital activity. We showed a large reduction in overall outpatient imaging activity: 49 250 records occurred in the 371 days post COVID-19 period compared with an expected 67 806 records pre COVID-19 period, representing 18 556 'missed' records. Governmental restrictions were associated with reductions in activity, with the largest reduction in activity during tiers 3 and 4 restrictions. Rescheduling such missed outpatients' appointments represents considerable resource planning and the associated clinical impact on paediatric healthcare remains to be determined.

3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(6): e2112596, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265355

ABSTRACT

Importance: Additional sources of pediatric epidemiological and clinical data are needed to efficiently study COVID-19 in children and youth and inform infection prevention and clinical treatment of pediatric patients. Objective: To describe international hospitalization trends and key epidemiological and clinical features of children and youth with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study included pediatric patients hospitalized between February 2 and October 10, 2020. Patient-level electronic health record (EHR) data were collected across 27 hospitals in France, Germany, Spain, Singapore, the UK, and the US. Patients younger than 21 years who tested positive for COVID-19 and were hospitalized at an institution participating in the Consortium for Clinical Characterization of COVID-19 by EHR were included in the study. Main Outcomes and Measures: Patient characteristics, clinical features, and medication use. Results: There were 347 males (52%; 95% CI, 48.5-55.3) and 324 females (48%; 95% CI, 44.4-51.3) in this study's cohort. There was a bimodal age distribution, with the greatest proportion of patients in the 0- to 2-year (199 patients [30%]) and 12- to 17-year (170 patients [25%]) age range. Trends in hospitalizations for 671 children and youth found discrete surges with variable timing across 6 countries. Data from this cohort mirrored national-level pediatric hospitalization trends for most countries with available data, with peaks in hospitalizations during the initial spring surge occurring within 23 days in the national-level and 4CE data. A total of 27 364 laboratory values for 16 laboratory tests were analyzed, with mean values indicating elevations in markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, 83 mg/L; 95% CI, 53-112 mg/L; ferritin, 417 ng/mL; 95% CI, 228-607 ng/mL; and procalcitonin, 1.45 ng/mL; 95% CI, 0.13-2.77 ng/mL). Abnormalities in coagulation were also evident (D-dimer, 0.78 ug/mL; 95% CI, 0.35-1.21 ug/mL; and fibrinogen, 477 mg/dL; 95% CI, 385-569 mg/dL). Cardiac troponin, when checked (n = 59), was elevated (0.032 ng/mL; 95% CI, 0.000-0.080 ng/mL). Common complications included cardiac arrhythmias (15.0%; 95% CI, 8.1%-21.7%), viral pneumonia (13.3%; 95% CI, 6.5%-20.1%), and respiratory failure (10.5%; 95% CI, 5.8%-15.3%). Few children were treated with COVID-19-directed medications. Conclusions and Relevance: This study of EHRs of children and youth hospitalized for COVID-19 in 6 countries demonstrated variability in hospitalization trends across countries and identified common complications and laboratory abnormalities in children and youth with COVID-19 infection. Large-scale informatics-based approaches to integrate and analyze data across health care systems complement methods of disease surveillance and advance understanding of epidemiological and clinical features associated with COVID-19 in children and youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Electronic Health Records/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Global Health , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies
4.
Transpl Infect Dis ; 23(2): e13500, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-916948

ABSTRACT

There is still no consensus on the optimal management of COVID-19 within the general population due to the emerging evidence base. High-risk groups, including kidney transplant recipients living with HIV present unique additional challenges. Here we discuss two kidney transplant recipients living with HIV with SARS-CoV-2 infection and their clinical course, and review the existing literature for this subset of challenging patients.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Graft Rejection/prevention & control , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Kidney Transplantation , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Atovaquone/therapeutic use , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , CD4-CD8 Ratio , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Dideoxynucleosides/therapeutic use , Female , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/immunology , HIV-1/genetics , Humans , Immunocompromised Host/immunology , Lamivudine/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Mycophenolic Acid/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Pneumocystis/prevention & control , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , RNA, Viral , Raltegravir Potassium/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Tacrolimus/therapeutic use , Trimethoprim, Sulfamethoxazole Drug Combination/therapeutic use
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