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1.
BMC Neurol ; 23(1): 147, 2023 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2302357

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Real-world evidence on experience and satisfaction of ofatumumab as a treatment option for relapsing multiple sclerosis (RMS) is limited. OBJECTIVE: To present cumulative responses from a questionnaire related to first-hand experience of treating physicians on handling and convenience of ofatumumab therapy along with concerns related to COVID-19. METHODS: PERITIA was a multicentre survey conducted to collect responses from the ASCLEPIOS I/II trial investigators from Europe via an online questionnaire. RESULTS: Forty-six physicians (Germany, n = 14; Spain, n = 12; Portugal, n = 10; Italy, n = 10) completed the survey. Overall, 43% of the physicians considered the benefit-risk ratio of ofatumumab as very good. Over 93% were in favour of ofatumumab self-administration at home and the majority (83%) believed it to be completely true that self-administration of ofatumumab eases the burden for patients in terms of time. All investigators would like to potentially use anti-CD20 therapy as a long-term strategy. Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, physicians were in favour of a self-administration of MS therapy at home over other anti-CD20 therapy infusions. CONCLUSION: European neurologists who were part of this survey considered the benefit-risk-ratio of ofatumumab as favourable and the monthly self-administered subcutaneous injections offering convenience for patients in the clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal , COVID-19 , Humans , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Pandemics , Europe/epidemiology , Personal Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Neurol Sci ; 43(2): 1007-1014, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1669827

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the concordance between Google Maps® application (GM®) and clinical practice measurements of ambulatory function (e.g., Ambulation Score (AS) and respective Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS)) in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross-sectional multicenter study. AS and EDSS were calculated using GM® and routine clinical methods; the correspondence between the two methods was assessed. A multinomial logistic model is investigated which demographic (age, sex) and clinical features (e.g., disease subtype, fatigue, depression) might have influenced discrepancies between the two methods. RESULTS: Two hundred forty-three pwMS were included; discrepancies in AS and in EDDS assessments between GM® and routine clinical methods were found in 81/243 (33.3%) and 74/243 (30.4%) pwMS, respectively. Progressive phenotype (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-7.11, p = 0.03), worse fatigue (OR = 1.03; 95% CI 1.01-1.06, p = 0.01), and more severe depression (OR = 1.1; 95% CI 1.04-1.17, p = 0.002) were associated with discrepancies between GM® and routine clinical scoring. CONCLUSION: GM® could easily be used in a real-life clinical setting to calculate the AS and the related EDSS scores. GM® should be considered for validation in further clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Multiple Sclerosis , Search Engine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis
3.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3375-3383, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In multiple sclerosis (MS), disease-related factors and dysfunctional coping might favor the development of mental distress induced by COVID-19 containment measures. Aim of this study was exploring the relationship between disability, coping strategies, daily life reorganization and neuropsychiatric symptoms in an Italian MS population during the COVID-19 lockdown, in order to identify potentially modifiable factors that could inform clinical management of mental distress in people with MS. METHODS: We explored the relationship between mental distress, disability and coping strategies in the Italian MS population under lockdown. Structural equation modeling was applied to information collected via web survey to identify modifiable factors that could account for mental distress. RESULTS: A total of 845 participants (497 with MS and 348 controls) were included in the study. The MS group had higher scores than the control group for depression (p = 0.005), but not for anxiety, emotional dyscontrol or sleep disturbances. The structural equation modeling explained 74% of the variance observed in depression score. Within the model, three latent factors were characterized from measured variables: motor disability and cognitive dysfunction contributed to disability (ß = 0.509 and ß = 0.836; p < 0.001); positive attitude and exercise contributed to active attitude (ß = 0.386 and ß = 0.297; p < 0.001); and avoidance, social support and watching television contributed to passive attitude (ß = 0.301, ß = 0.243 and ß = 0.212; p < 0.001). With regard to the relationship between latent factors and their influence on depression, disability contributed to passive attitude (ß = 0.855; p < 0.001), while both passive and active attitude significantly influenced depression (ß = 0.729 and ß = -0.456; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: As a practical implication of our model, favoring exercise would enhance active attitude and its positive impact on mental well-being while, at the same time, reducing the negative impact of disability on depression, representing a valuable tool in facing COVID-19-related mental distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Motor Disorders , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3396-3402, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The COVID-19 emergency may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and with regard to people with MS (pwMS) chronic exposure to a wide range of challenging life events has been shown to be correlated with worsening of neurological symptoms, increased lesion burden on brain magnetic resonance imaging and relapses. The aim was to investigate perceived stress, depression, perceived social support, habits and behaviour changes in pwMS through COVID-19 in comparison to a control group. METHODS: A web-based survey was posted on SMsocialnetwork.com to investigate perceived stress (using the Perceived Stress Scale), depression (with Patient Health Questionnaire 2) and perceived social support (using Social Provision Scale 10 item) in pwMS and a control group through the COVID-19 pandemic. A secondary group of people with migraine was investigated. RESULTS: In all, 1286 answers from 612 pwMS and 674 control people were included in the final analysis. The answers from 318 people with migraine were included for a secondary analysis. A higher proportion of pwMS were depressed (43.1% vs. 23.1%; p < 0.001), had a high level of perceived stress (58% vs. 39.8%; p < 0.001) and felt significantly less social support (median 33 vs. 35; Q1-Q3 28-36 vs. 32-37; p < 0.001) compared to the control group. A higher percentage of people with migraine were depressed (50% vs. 43%, p = 0.04) compared to pwMS. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the negative impact that prolonged stress may have on clinical and radiological disease activity of pwMS, and bearing in mind that a beneficial effect has been demonstrated and achieved with stress management, it is suggested to promote stress control in these patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
5.
J Clin Med ; 10(6)2021 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1136516

ABSTRACT

Physical disability impacts psychosocial wellbeing in people with multiple sclerosis. However, the role of physical activity in this context is still debated. By taking advantage of a previous survey, conducted online from 22 April to 7 May 2020, we performed a post-hoc analysis with the aim to assess the associations between disability, physical exercise, and mental health in multiple sclerosis. We retrieved the following data: (i) sociodemographic information, (ii) changes in lifestyle (including exercise), (iii) physical disability, as measured with the Patient-Determined Disease Steps scale, and (iv) anxiety feelings and depressive symptoms assessed via the items included in the Quality of Life in Neurological Disorders measurement system. Examination of the interaction plot showed that the effect of disability on depression, but not on anxious symptoms, was significant for all levels of physical exercise (low: b = 1.22, 95% C.I. 0.85, 1.58, p < 0.001; moderate: b = 0.95, 95% C.I. 0.66, 1.24, p < 0.001; and high: b = 0.68, 95% C.I. 0.24, 1.13, p = 0.003). Based on these data, we can conclude that disability significantly impacted depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, with physical activity playing a moderating role. Our results suggest that favoring exercise in multiple sclerosis (MS) would ameliorate psychological wellbeing regardless of the level of physical disability.

6.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 41: 102165, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-155248

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, which was identified after a recent outbreak in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, has generated a global pandemic impacting over 200 countries around the world. Recent reports suggest that ACE2, which is the target protein to invade the host, has a ubiquitous presence in human organs, including lung parenchyma, gastrointestinal tract, nasal mucosa, renal and urinary tract, airway epithelia, lymphoid tissues, reproductive organs, vascular endothelium and neurons. In this scenario, neurologists are particularly involved into considering even more specific therapeutic strategies according to the available data during the pandemic. In particular, MS patients are usually receiving disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) with immunosuppressant or immunomodulatory effects, which increase the risk of infections and morbidity, compared with the general population. Development of PML or other serious opportunistic infections during treatment with natalizumab forces to consider whether de-risking strategies are needed in this particular context and how to manage a high-efficacy treatment. METHODS: In this paper we report on a patient treated with natalizumab for relapsing MS who developed COVID-19 and recovered in a few days without complications. RESULTS: After recovery natalizumab has been administered in the window of the extended interval dosing (EID), without reporting any worsening or new symptoms. DISCUSSION: This case supports the opportunity to avoid discontinuing or delaying the retreatment over 8 weeks in patients recovered from a recent COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunologic Factors/administration & dosage , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/drug therapy , Natalizumab/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Drug Administration Schedule , Humans , Male , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/complications , Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting/diagnosis , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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