Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-335386

ABSTRACT

Background: Kidney failure is the second most frequent condition after acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in critically ill patients with severe COVID-19 and is strongly associated with mortality. The aim of this multicentric study was to assess the impact of the specific treatments of COVID-19 and ARDS on the risk of severe acute kidney injury (AKI) in critically ill COVID-19 patients.MethodsIn this cohort study, data from consecutive patients hospitalized in 6 ICUs for COVID-19 were retrospectively collected. The incidence and severity of AKI were monitored during the entire ICU stay. Patients older than 18 years admitted to the ICU for COVID-19-related ARDS requiring invasive mechanical ventilation were included.Results164 patients were included in the final analysis, 97 (59.1%) displayed AKI, of which 39 (23.8%) severe stage 3 AKI and 21 (12.8%) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). In univariate analysis, severe AKI was associated with Angiotensin Converting Enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) exposure (p=0.016), arterial hypertension (p=0.029), APACHE-II score (p=0.004) and mortality at D28 (p=0.008), D60 (p<0.001) and D90 (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, the factors associated with the onset of stage 3 AKI were: exposure to ACEI (OR: 4.238 (1.307-13.736), p=0.016), APACHE II score (without age) (OR: 1.138 (1.044-1.241), p=0.003) and iNO (OR: 5.694 (1.953-16.606), p=0.001). Protective factors were prone positioning (OR: 0.234 (0.057-0.967), p=0.045) and dexamethasone (OR: 0.194 (0.053-0.713), p=0.014).ConclusionsDexamethasone was associated with a prevention of the risk of severe AKI and RRT, and iNO was associated with severe AKI and RRT in critically ill patients with COVID-19. iNO should be used with caution in COVID-19 related ARDS.

2.
Eur Heart J Case Rep ; 6(4): ytac112, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816067

ABSTRACT

Background: A novel multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) temporally associated with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection has been reported, arising weeks after the peak incidence of COVID-19 infection in adults. Patients with MIS-C have been reported to have cardiac involvement and clinical features overlapping with other acute inflammatory syndromes such as Kawasaki disease, toxic shock syndrome, and macrophage activation syndrome. Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children may follow COVID-19 infection, most of the time after its asymptomatic form, even though it can lead to serious and life-threatening illness. Case summary: In this case series, we discuss two cases of young adults with no former medical history who fit with the criteria defined in MIS-C. They both developed a refractory cardiogenic shock and required intensive care treatment including mechanical circulatory support, specifically the use of venous-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. They were both treated early with intravenous immune globulin and adjunctive high-dose steroids. They recovered ad integrum in less than 2 weeks. Discussion: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children occurs 2-4 weeks after infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Patients with MIS-C should ideally be managed in an intensive care environment since rapid clinical deterioration may occur. It would be preferable to have a multidisciplinary care to improve outcomes. Patients should be monitored for shock. Elucidating the mechanism of this new entity may have importance for understanding COVID-19 far beyond the patients who have had MIS-C to date. The pathogenesis seems to involve post-infectious immune dysregulation so early administration intravenous immune globulin associated with corticosteroids appears appropriate. It implies early recognition of the syndrome even in young adults.

3.
J Clin Med ; 10(23)2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1542625

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe clinical characteristics and management of intensive care units (ICU) patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 and to determine 90-day mortality after ICU admission and associated risk factors. METHODS: This observational retrospective study was conducted in six intensive care units (ICUs) in three university hospitals in Marseille, France. Between 10 March and 10 May 2020, all adult patients admitted in ICU with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 and respiratory failure were eligible for inclusion. The statistical analysis was focused on the mechanically ventilated patients. The primary outcome was the 90-day mortality after ICU admission. RESULTS: Included in the study were 172 patients with COVID-19 related respiratory failure, 117 of whom (67%) received invasive mechanical ventilation. 90-day mortality of the invasively ventilated patients was 27.4%. Median duration of ventilation and median length of stay in ICU for these patients were 20 (9-33) days and 29 (17-46) days. Mortality increased with the severity of ARDS at ICU admission. After multivariable analysis was carried out, risk factors associated with 90-day mortality were age, elevated Charlson comorbidity index, chronic statins intake and occurrence of an arterial thrombosis. CONCLUSION: In this cohort, age and number of comorbidities were the main predictors of mortality in invasively ventilated patients. The only modifiable factor associated with mortality in multivariate analysis was arterial thrombosis.

4.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 157, 2021 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518296

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since March 2020, health care systems were importantly affected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) outbreak, with some patients presenting severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), requiring extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). We designed an ambispective observational cohort study including all consecutive adult patients admitted to 5 different ICUs from a university hospital. The main objective was to identify the risk factors of severe COVID-19 ARDS patients supported by ECMO associated with 90-day survival. RESULTS: Between March 1st and November 30th 2020, 76 patients with severe COVID-19 ARDS were supported by ECMO. Median (interquartile range IQR) duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) prior to ECMO was of 6 (3-10) days. At ECMO initiation, patients had a median PaO2:FiO2 of 71 mmHg (IQR 62-81), median PaCO2 of 58 mmHg (IQR 51-66) and a median arterial pH of 7.33 (IQR 7.25-7.38). Forty-five patients (59%) were weaned from ECMO. Twenty-eight day, 60-day and 90-day survival rates were, respectively, 92, 62 and 51%. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, with 2 models, one with the RESP score and one with the PRESERVE score, we found that higher BMI was associated with higher 90-day survival [odds ratio (OR): 0.775 (0.644-0.934), p = 0.007) and 0.631 (0.462-0.862), respectively]. Younger age was also associated with 90-day survival in both models [OR: 1.1354 (1.004-1.285), p = 0.044 and 1.187 (1.035-1.362), p = 0.014 respectively]. Obese patients were ventilated with higher PEEP than non-obese patients and presented slightly higher respiratory system compliance. CONCLUSION: In this ambispective observational cohort of COVID-19 severe ARDS supported by ECMO, obesity was an independent factor associated with improved survival at 90-day.

5.
Anaesth Crit Care Pain Med ; 40(4): 100931, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1306763

ABSTRACT

AIM: Describing acute respiratory distress syndrome patterns, therapeutics management, and outcomes of ICU COVID-19 patients and indentifying risk factors of 28-day mortality. METHODS: Prospective multicentre, cohort study conducted in 29 French ICUs. Baseline characteristics, comorbidities, adjunctive therapies, ventilatory support at ICU admission and survival data were collected. RESULTS: From March to July 2020, 966 patients were enrolled with a median age of 66 (interquartile range 58-73) years and a median SAPS II of 37 (29-48). During the first 24 h of ICU admission, COVID-19 patients received one of the following respiratory supports: mechanical ventilation for 559 (58%), standard oxygen therapy for 228 (24%) and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) for 179 (19%) patients. Overall, 721 (75%) patients were mechanically ventilated during their ICU stay. Prone positioning and neuromuscular blocking agents were used in 494 (51%) and 460 (48%) patients, respectively. Bacterial co-infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia were diagnosed in 79 (3%) and 411 (43%) patients, respectively. The overall 28-day mortality was 18%. Age, pre-existing comorbidities, severity of respiratory failure and the absence of antiviral therapy on admission were identified as independent predictors of 28-day outcome. CONCLUSION: Severity of hypoxaemia on admission, older age (> 70 years), cardiovascular and renal comorbidities were associated with worse outcome in COVID-19 patients. Antiviral treatment on admission was identified as a protective factor for 28-day mortality. Ascertaining the outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients is crucial to optimise hospital and ICU resources and provide the appropriate intensity level of care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Cohort Studies , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial
6.
Intensive Care Med ; 47(6): 653-664, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263138

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The effect of the routine use of a stylet during tracheal intubation on first-attempt intubation success is unclear. We hypothesised that the first-attempt intubation success rate would be higher with tracheal tube + stylet than with tracheal tube alone. METHODS: In this multicentre randomised controlled trial, conducted in 32 intensive care units, we randomly assigned patients to tracheal tube + stylet or tracheal tube alone (i.e. without stylet). The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with first-attempt intubation success. The secondary outcome was the proportion of patients with complications related to tracheal intubation. Serious adverse events, i.e., traumatic injuries related to tracheal intubation, were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 999 patients were included in the modified intention-to-treat analysis: 501 (50%) to tracheal tube + stylet and 498 (50%) to tracheal tube alone. First-attempt intubation success occurred in 392 patients (78.2%) in the tracheal tube + stylet group and in 356 (71.5%) in the tracheal tube alone group (absolute risk difference, 6.7; 95%CI 1.4-12.1; relative risk, 1.10; 95%CI 1.02-1.18; P = 0.01). A total of 194 patients (38.7%) in the tracheal tube + stylet group had complications related to tracheal intubation, as compared with 200 patients (40.2%) in the tracheal tube alone group (absolute risk difference, - 1.5; 95%CI - 7.5 to 4.6; relative risk, 0.96; 95%CI 0.83-1.12; P = 0.64). The incidence of serious adverse events was 4.0% and 3.6%, respectively (absolute risk difference, 0.4; 95%CI, - 2.0 to 2.8; relative risk, 1.10; 95%CI 0.59-2.06. P = 0.76). CONCLUSIONS: Among critically ill adults undergoing tracheal intubation, using a stylet improves first-attempt intubation success.


Subject(s)
Critical Illness , Intubation, Intratracheal , Adult , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal/adverse effects
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL