Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
World J Diabetes ; 12(10): 1674-1692, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488827

ABSTRACT

Diabetes, whether due to pancreatic beta cells insufficiency or peripheral resistance to insulin, has been suggested as a risk factor of developing severe acute respiratory disease coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections. Indeed, diabetes has been associated with a higher risk of infections and higher risk of developing severe forms of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) related pneumonia. Diabetic patients often present associated comorbidities such as obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular diseases, and complications of diabetes, including chronic kidney disease, vasculopathy and relative immune dysfunction, all of which make them more susceptible to infectious complications. Moreover, they often present low-grade inflammation with increased circulating interleukin levels, endothelial susceptibility to inflammation and dysfunction, and finally, hyperglycemia, which increases this risk. Additionally, corticosteroids, which count among the few medications which showed benefit on survival and mechanical ventilation requirement in COVID-19 pneumonia in large randomized controlled trials, are associated to new onsets of diabetes, and metabolic disorders in patients with previous history of diabetes. Finally, SARS-CoV-2 via the alternate effects of the renin-angiotensin system, mediated by the angiotensin-converting-enzyme 2, was also associated with insulin resistance in key tissues involved in glucose homeostasis, such as liver, skeletal muscles, and adipose tissue; and also, with impaired insulin secretion by pancreatic ß-cells. In this work, we reviewed all elements which may help understand how diabetes affects patients with COVID-19, how treatments affect outcomes in patients with COVID-19, how they may cause new onsets of diabetes, and finally review how SARS-CoV-2 may inherently be a risk factor of developing diabetes, through immune-mediated diabetogenic mechanisms.

2.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 2021 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442028

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to assess the impact of a history of metabolic and bariatric surgery (MBS) on the clinical outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and severe obesity hospitalized for COVID-19. METHODS: Post-hoc analysis from the nationwide observational CORONADO study: patients with T2D and history of MBS were matched with patients without MBS for age, sex and body mass index (BMI) either at the time of MBS or on admission for COVID-19. The composite primary outcome (CPO) combined invasive mechanical ventilation and/or death within 7 and 28 days following admission. RESULTS: Out of 2 398 CORONADO participants, 20 had history of MBS. When matching for BMI at the time of MBS and after adjustment on diabetes duration, the CPO occurred less frequently within 7 days (3 vs 17 events, OR: 0.15 [0.01-0.94], P=0.03) and 28 days (3 vs 19 events, OR: 0.11 (0.01-0.71), P=0.02) in patients with MBS (n=16) vs controls (n=44). There was no difference in CPO rate between patients with MBS and controls when matching for BMI on admission. CONCLUSIONS: These data are reassuring regarding COVID-19 prognosis in patients with diabetes with history of MBS compared to those without MBS.

3.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(2): 299-311, 2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398974

ABSTRACT

Objective: Male sex is one of the determinants of severe coronavirus diseas-e-2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to characterize sex differences in severe outcomes in adults with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19. Methods: We performed a sex-stratified analysis of clinical and biological features and outcomes (i.e. invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), death, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and home discharge at day 7 (D7) or day 28 (D28)) in 2380 patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 and included in the nationwide CORONADO observational study (NCT04324736). Results: The study population was predominantly male (63.5%). After multiple adjustments, female sex was negatively associated with the primary outcome (IMV and/or death, OR: 0.66 (0.49-0.88)), death (OR: 0.49 (0.30-0.79)) and ICU admission (OR: 0.57 (0.43-0.77)) at D7 but only with ICU admission (OR: 0.58 (0.43-0.77)) at D28. Older age and a history of microvascular complications were predictors of death at D28 in both sexes, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was predictive of death in women only. At admission, C-reactive protein (CRP), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to the CKD-EPI formula predicted death in both sexes. Lymphocytopenia was an independent predictor of death in women only, while thrombocytopenia and elevated plasma glucose concentration were predictors of death in men only. Conclusions: In patients with diabetes admitted for COVID-19, female sex was associated with lower incidence of early severe outcomes, but did not influence the overall in-hospital mortality, suggesting that diabetes mitigates the female protection from COVID-19 severity. Sex-associated biological determinants may be useful to optimize COVID-19 prevention and management in women and men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Sex Characteristics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 20(1): 165, 2021 08 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 diabetic adults are at increased risk of severe forms irrespective of obesity. In patients with type-II diabetes, fat distribution is characterized by visceral and ectopic adipose tissues expansion, resulting in systemic inflammation, which may play a role in driving the COVID-19 cytokine storm. Our aim was to determine if cardiac adipose tissue, combined to interleukin-6 levels, could predict adverse short-term outcomes, death and ICU requirement, in COVID-19 diabetic patients during the 21 days after admission. METHODS: Eighty one consecutive patients with type-II diabetes admitted for COVID-19 were included. Interleukin-6 measurement and chest computed tomography with total cardiac adipose tissue index (CATi) measurement were performed at admission. The primary outcome was death during the 21 days following admission while intensive care requirement with or without early death (ICU-R) defined the secondary endpoint. Associations of CATi and IL-6 and threshold values to predict the primary and secondary endpoints were determined. RESULTS: Of the enrolled patients (median age 66 years [IQR: 59-74]), 73% male, median body mass index (BMI) 27 kg/m2 [IQR: 24-31]) 20 patients had died from COVID-19, 20 required intensive care and 41 were in conventional care at day 21 after admission. Increased CATi and IL-6 levels were both significantly related to increased early mortality (respectively OR = 6.15, p = 0.002; OR = 18.2, p < 0.0001) and ICU-R (respectively OR = 3.27, p = 0.01; OR = 4.86, p = 0.002). These associations remained significant independently of age, sex, BMI as well as troponin-T level and pulmonary lesion extension in CT. We combined CATi and IL-6 levels as a multiplicative interaction score (CATi*IL-6). The cut-point for this score was ≥ 6386 with a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 0.87 (AUC = 0.88) and an OR of 59.6 for early mortality (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Cardiac adipose tissue index and IL-6 determination at admission could help physicians to better identify diabetic patients with a potentially severe and lethal short term course irrespective of obesity. Diabetic patients with high CATi at admission, a fortiori associated with high IL-6 levels could be a relevant target population to promptly initiate anti-inflammatory therapies.


Subject(s)
Adipose Tissue/pathology , COVID-19/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Interleukin-6/blood , Myocardium/pathology , Adipose Tissue/diagnostic imaging , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Organ Size , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
5.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(2): 299-311, 2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259263

ABSTRACT

Objective: Male sex is one of the determinants of severe coronavirus diseas-e-2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to characterize sex differences in severe outcomes in adults with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19. Methods: We performed a sex-stratified analysis of clinical and biological features and outcomes (i.e. invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), death, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and home discharge at day 7 (D7) or day 28 (D28)) in 2380 patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 and included in the nationwide CORONADO observational study (NCT04324736). Results: The study population was predominantly male (63.5%). After multiple adjustments, female sex was negatively associated with the primary outcome (IMV and/or death, OR: 0.66 (0.49-0.88)), death (OR: 0.49 (0.30-0.79)) and ICU admission (OR: 0.57 (0.43-0.77)) at D7 but only with ICU admission (OR: 0.58 (0.43-0.77)) at D28. Older age and a history of microvascular complications were predictors of death at D28 in both sexes, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was predictive of death in women only. At admission, C-reactive protein (CRP), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to the CKD-EPI formula predicted death in both sexes. Lymphocytopenia was an independent predictor of death in women only, while thrombocytopenia and elevated plasma glucose concentration were predictors of death in men only. Conclusions: In patients with diabetes admitted for COVID-19, female sex was associated with lower incidence of early severe outcomes, but did not influence the overall in-hospital mortality, suggesting that diabetes mitigates the female protection from COVID-19 severity. Sex-associated biological determinants may be useful to optimize COVID-19 prevention and management in women and men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Sex Characteristics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
6.
Diabetologia ; 64(4): 778-794, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1086549

ABSTRACT

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This is an update of the results from the previous report of the CORONADO (Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and Diabetes Outcomes) study, which aims to describe the outcomes and prognostic factors in patients with diabetes hospitalised for coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: The CORONADO initiative is a French nationwide multicentre study of patients with diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19 with a 28-day follow-up. The patients were screened after hospital admission from 10 March to 10 April 2020. We mainly focused on hospital discharge and death within 28 days. RESULTS: We included 2796 participants: 63.7% men, mean age 69.7 ± 13.2 years, median BMI (25th-75th percentile) 28.4 (25.0-32.4) kg/m2. Microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications were found in 44.2% and 38.6% of participants, respectively. Within 28 days, 1404 (50.2%; 95% CI 48.3%, 52.1%) were discharged from hospital with a median duration of hospital stay of 9 (5-14) days, while 577 participants died (20.6%; 95% CI 19.2%, 22.2%). In multivariable models, younger age, routine metformin therapy and longer symptom duration on admission were positively associated with discharge. History of microvascular complications, anticoagulant routine therapy, dyspnoea on admission, and higher aspartate aminotransferase, white cell count and C-reactive protein levels were associated with a reduced chance of discharge. Factors associated with death within 28 days mirrored those associated with discharge, and also included routine treatment by insulin and statin as deleterious factors. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In patients with diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19, we established prognostic factors for hospital discharge and death that could help clinicians in this pandemic period. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT04324736.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Patient Discharge , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Complications/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
7.
Diabetes Metab ; 47(5): 101216, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-967629

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Metformin exerts anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. We addressed the impact of prior metformin use on prognosis in patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19. METHODS: CORONADO is a nationwide observational study that included patients with diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19 between March 10 and April 10, 2020 in 68 French centres. The primary outcome combined tracheal intubation and/or death within 7 days of admission. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was reported for death up to day 28. The association between metformin use and outcomes was then estimated in a logistic regression analysis after applying a propensity score inverse probability of treatment weighting approach. RESULTS: Among the 2449 patients included, 1496 were metformin users and 953 were not. Compared with non-users, metformin users were younger with a lower prevalence of diabetic complications, but had more severe features of COVID-19 on admission. The primary endpoint occurred in 28.0% of metformin users (vs 29.0% in non-users, P = 0.6134) on day 7 and in 32.6% (vs 38.7%, P = 0.0023) on day 28. The mortality rate was lower in metformin users on day 7 (8.2 vs 16.1%, P < 0.0001) and on day 28 (16.0 vs 28.6%, P < 0.0001). After propensity score weighting was applied, the odds ratios for primary outcome and death (OR [95%CI], metformin users vs non-users) were 0.838 [0.649-1.082] and 0.688 [0.470-1.007] on day 7, then 0.783 [0.615-0.996] and 0.710 [0.537-0.938] on day 28, respectively. CONCLUSION: Metformin use appeared to be associated with a lower risk of death in patients with diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Metformin/therapeutic use , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Respiration, Artificial/mortality
8.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 23(2): 391-403, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-857855

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess the relationship between body mass index (BMI) classes and early COVID-19 prognosis in inpatients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). METHODS: From the CORONAvirus-SARS-CoV-2 and Diabetes Outcomes (CORONADO) study, we conducted an analysis in patients with T2D categorized by four BMI subgroups according to the World Health Organization classification. Clinical characteristics and COVID-19-related outcomes (i.e. intubation for mechanical ventilation [IMV], death and discharge by day 7 [D7]) were analysed according to BMI status. RESULTS: Among 1965 patients with T2D, 434 (22.1%) normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2 , reference group), 726 (36.9%) overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2 ) and 805 (41.0%) obese subjects were analysed, including 491 (25.0%) with class I obesity (30-34.9 kg/m2 ) and 314 (16.0%) with class II/III obesity (≥35 kg/m2 ). In a multivariable-adjusted model, the primary outcome (i.e. IMV and/or death by D7) was significantly associated with overweight (OR 1.65 [1.05-2.59]), class I (OR 1.93 [1.19-3.14]) and class II/III obesity (OR 1.98 [1.11-3.52]). After multivariable adjustment, primary outcome by D7 was significantly associated with obesity in patients aged younger than 75 years, while such an association was no longer found in those aged older than 75 years. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity are associated with poor early prognosis in patients with T2D hospitalized for COVID-19. Importantly, the deleterious impact of obesity on COVID-19 prognosis was no longer observed in the elderly, highlighting the need for specific management in this population.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Obesity/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/mortality , Obesity/physiopathology , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies
12.
Diabetologia ; 63(8): 1500-1515, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-422785

ABSTRACT

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is a life-threatening infection caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus. Diabetes has rapidly emerged as a major comorbidity for COVID-19 severity. However, the phenotypic characteristics of diabetes in COVID-19 patients are unknown. METHODS: We conducted a nationwide multicentre observational study in people with diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19 in 53 French centres in the period 10-31 March 2020. The primary outcome combined tracheal intubation for mechanical ventilation and/or death within 7 days of admission. Age- and sex-adjusted multivariable logistic regressions were performed to assess the prognostic value of clinical and biological features with the endpoint. ORs are reported for a 1 SD increase after standardisation. RESULTS: The current analysis focused on 1317 participants: 64.9% men, mean age 69.8 ± 13.0 years, median BMI 28.4 (25th-75th percentile: 25.0-32.7) kg/m2; with a predominance of type 2 diabetes (88.5%). Microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications were found in 46.8% and 40.8% of cases, respectively. The primary outcome was encountered in 29.0% (95% CI 26.6, 31.5) of participants, while 10.6% (9.0, 12.4) died and 18.0% (16.0, 20.2) were discharged on day 7. In univariate analysis, characteristics prior to admission significantly associated with the primary outcome were sex, BMI and previous treatment with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers, but not age, type of diabetes, HbA1c, diabetic complications or glucose-lowering therapies. In multivariable analyses with covariates prior to admission, only BMI remained positively associated with the primary outcome (OR 1.28 [1.10, 1.47]). On admission, dyspnoea (OR 2.10 [1.31, 3.35]), as well as lymphocyte count (OR 0.67 [0.50, 0.88]), C-reactive protein (OR 1.93 [1.43, 2.59]) and AST (OR 2.23 [1.70, 2.93]) levels were independent predictors of the primary outcome. Finally, age (OR 2.48 [1.74, 3.53]), treated obstructive sleep apnoea (OR 2.80 [1.46, 5.38]), and microvascular (OR 2.14 [1.16, 3.94]) and macrovascular complications (OR 2.54 [1.44, 4.50]) were independently associated with the risk of death on day 7. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATIONS: In people with diabetes hospitalised for COVID-19, BMI, but not long-term glucose control, was positively and independently associated with tracheal intubation and/or death within 7 days. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov NCT04324736.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism , Female , Glycated Hemoglobin A/metabolism , Humans , Hypertension/pathology , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...