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1.
Aerosp Med Hum Perform ; 92(10): 773-779, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1581388

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 virus has caused over 582,000 deaths in the United States to date. However, the pandemic has also afflicted the mental health of the population at large in the domains of anxiety and sleep disruption, potentially interfering with cognitive function. From an aviation perspective, safely operating an aircraft requires an airmans cognitive engagement for: 1) situational awareness, 2) spatial orientation, and 3) avionics programming. Since impaired cognitive function could interfere with such tasks, the current study was undertaken to determine if flight safety for a cohort of single engine, piston-powered light airplanes was adversely affected during a period of the pandemic (MarchOctober 2020) prior to U.S. approval of the first COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: Airplane accidents were per the National Transportation Safety Board Access database. Fleet times were derived using Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast. Statistics used Poisson distributions, Chi-squared/Fisher, and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: Little difference in accident rate was evident between the pandemic period (MarchOctober 2020) and the preceding (JanuaryFebruary) months (19 and 22 mishaps/100,000 h, respectively). Similarly, a proportional comparison of accidents occurring in 2020 with those for the corresponding months in 2019 failed to show over-representation of mishaps during the pandemic. Although a trend to a higher injury severity (43% vs. 34% serious/fatal injuries) was evident for pandemic-period mishaps, the proportional difference was not statistically significant when referencing the corresponding months in 2019. CONCLUSION: Surprisingly, using accidents as an outcome, the study herein shows little evidence of diminished flight safety for light aircraft operations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Boyd DD. General aviation flight safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2021; 92(10):773779.


Subject(s)
Aviation , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
2.
Aerosp Med Hum Perform ; 92(10): 773-779, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468324

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 virus has caused over 582,000 deaths in the United States to date. However, the pandemic has also afflicted the mental health of the population at large in the domains of anxiety and sleep disruption, potentially interfering with cognitive function. From an aviation perspective, safely operating an aircraft requires an airmans cognitive engagement for: 1) situational awareness, 2) spatial orientation, and 3) avionics programming. Since impaired cognitive function could interfere with such tasks, the current study was undertaken to determine if flight safety for a cohort of single engine, piston-powered light airplanes was adversely affected during a period of the pandemic (MarchOctober 2020) prior to U.S. approval of the first COVID-19 vaccine. METHODS: Airplane accidents were per the National Transportation Safety Board Access database. Fleet times were derived using Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast. Statistics used Poisson distributions, Chi-squared/Fisher, and Mann-Whitney tests. RESULTS: Little difference in accident rate was evident between the pandemic period (MarchOctober 2020) and the preceding (JanuaryFebruary) months (19 and 22 mishaps/100,000 h, respectively). Similarly, a proportional comparison of accidents occurring in 2020 with those for the corresponding months in 2019 failed to show over-representation of mishaps during the pandemic. Although a trend to a higher injury severity (43% vs. 34% serious/fatal injuries) was evident for pandemic-period mishaps, the proportional difference was not statistically significant when referencing the corresponding months in 2019. CONCLUSION: Surprisingly, using accidents as an outcome, the study herein shows little evidence of diminished flight safety for light aircraft operations during the COVID-19 pandemic. Boyd DD. General aviation flight safety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2021; 92(10):773779.


Subject(s)
Aviation , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
3.
J Card Surg ; 36(9): 3040-3051, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266339

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on health care and cardiac surgery. We report cardiac surgeons' concerns, perceptions, and responses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A detailed survey was sent to recruit participating adult cardiac surgery centers in North America. Data regarding cardiac surgeons' perceptions and changes in practice were analyzed. RESULTS: Our study comprises 67 institutions with diverse geographic distribution across North America. Nurses were most likely to be redeployed (88%), followed by advanced care practitioners (69%), trainees (28%), and surgeons (25%). Examining surgeon concerns in regard to COVID-19, they were most worried with exposing their family to COVID-19 (81%), followed by contracting COVID-19 (68%), running out of personal protective equipment (PPE) (28%), and hospital resources (28%). In terms of PPE conservation strategies among users of N95 respirators, nearly half were recycling via decontamination with ultraviolet light (49%), followed by sterilization with heat (13%) and at home or with other modalities (13%). Reuse of N95 respirators for 1 day (22%), 1 week (21%) or 1 month (6%) was reported. There were differences in adoption of methods to conserve N95 respirators based on institutional pandemic phase and COVID-19 burden, with higher COVID-19 burden institutions more likely to resort to PPE conservation strategies. CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates the impact of COVID-19 on North American cardiac surgeons. Our study should stimulate further discussions to identify optimal solutions to improve workforce preparedness for subsequent surges, as well as facilitate the navigation of future healthcare crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Surgeons , Adult , Decontamination , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2
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