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1.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(3): 235-236, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273261

ABSTRACT

I recently completed work at a large-scale, drive-through COVID-19 vaccination initiative and was immediately struck by its military parallel in mobilizing this emergent medical response. Federal personnel were deployed quickly to assist the local workforce untested in a public health domain. The expansive integration of technology was at a level I had not previously witnessed. Computerized algorithms organized the flow of cars through a huge fairground (think Disneyland Park). Databases were created to register the public, make appointments, and document the specifics of vaccination administration. From day one, the pharmacy tent was in constant overdrive to ensure vaccine supply was in sync with hourly demand. The interface of all these platforms vaccinated 2,300 people per day.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/nursing , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Oncology Nursing , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing ; 25(3):235-236, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1257716

ABSTRACT

Federal personnel were deployed quickly to assist the local workforce untested in a public health domain. Consider what nursing looked like when you started your career and what it looks like now-for me, there has been dramatic change. [...]you must anticipate equivalent remodeling in the future. From my ongoing review of the COVID-19 literature, five themes have the potential to endure long-term and have special relevance to oncology nursing (Dzau et al., 2020;Fautcux, 2021;Meti et al., 2020;Muturi et ak, 2020;Pham et ak, 2020;Shah et ak, 2021;Yackzan & Mahon, 2021;Zanville et ak, 2021): * Achieving enhanced understanding of others' roles, learning how to practice together, and engaging in skilled communication * Reclaiming nursing's public health roots by focusing more on communitybased care * Practicing-not just talking about- diversity and inclusion * Rapidly adopting telehealth and virtual care * Acknowledging historic mental health neglect through pervasive prevention and wellness program integration This year, I celebrate 50 years as a nurse and recognize common ground between then and now.

3.
Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book ; 41: e339-e353, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249568

ABSTRACT

Optimizing the well-being of the oncology clinician has never been more important. Well-being is a critical priority for the cancer organization because burnout adversely impacts the quality of care, patient satisfaction, the workforce, and overall practice success. To date, 45% of U.S. ASCO member medical oncologists report experiencing burnout symptoms of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. As the COVID-19 pandemic remains widespread with periods of outbreaks, recovery, and response with substantial personal and professional consequences for the clinician, it is imperative that the oncologist, team, and organization gain direct access to resources addressing burnout. In response, the Clinician Well-Being Task Force was created to improve the quality, safety, and value of cancer care by enhancing oncology clinician well-being and practice sustainability. Well-being is an integrative concept that characterizes quality of life and encompasses an individual's work- and personal health-related environmental, organizational, and psychosocial factors. These resources can be useful for the cancer organization to develop a well-being blueprint: a detailed start plan with recognized strategies and interventions targeting all oncology stakeholders to support a culture of community in oncology.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Medical Oncology/methods , Neoplasms/therapy , Oncologists/psychology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/prevention & control , Burnout, Psychological/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Internet , Job Satisfaction , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Social Support , United States
4.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 24(4): 434-438, 2020 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823004

ABSTRACT

The majority of patients with cancer are adults aged 65 years or older. Despite this, their special needs are generally under-recognized and under-researched. This includes the lack of awareness about scams targeting vulnerable older adults. The purpose of this article is to share knowledge and resources about financial exploitation of patients aged 65 years or older. Enhanced recognition of this phenomenon can facilitate oncology nurses' early identification and interventions for at-risk older adult populations.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms , Aged , Humans , Knowledge
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