Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 30(12): 986-995, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526510

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of a pandemic on unplanned hospital attendance has not been extensively examined. The aim of this study is to report the nationwide consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on unplanned hospital attendances in Denmark for 7 weeks after a 'shelter at home' order was issued. METHODS: We merged data from national registries (Civil Registration System and Patient Registry) to conduct a study of unplanned (excluding outpatient visits and elective surgery) hospital-based healthcare and mortality of all Danes. Using data for 7 weeks after the 'shelter at home' order, the incidence rate of unplanned hospital attendances per week in 2020 was compared with corresponding weeks in 2017-2019. The main outcome was hospital attendances per week as incidence rate ratios. Secondary outcomes were general population mortality and risk of death in-hospital, reported as weekly mortality rate ratios (MRRs). RESULTS: From 2 438 286 attendances in the study period, overall unplanned attendances decreased by up to 21%; attendances excluding COVID-19 were reduced by 31%; non-psychiatric by 31% and psychiatric by 30%. Out of the five most common diagnoses expected to remain stable, only schizophrenia and myocardial infarction remained stable, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, hip fracture and urinary tract infection fell significantly. The nationwide general population MRR rose in six of the recorded weeks, while MRR excluding patients who were COVID-19 positive only increased in two. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic and a governmental national 'shelter at home' order was associated with a marked reduction in unplanned hospital attendances with an increase in MRR for the general population in two of 7 weeks, despite exclusion of patients with COVID-19. The findings should be taken into consideration when planning for public information campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Brain Behav ; 11(8): e2264, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293148

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in national lockdowns in several countries. Previous global epidemics led to an increase in the number of psychiatric patients presenting symptoms of anxiety or depression. Knowledge about the impact of early lockdown initiatives during the COVID-19 pandemic on the number of healthcare interactions is sparse. Contacts in this study include all recorded face-to-face (FTF) and virtual treatment interactions between patients and healthcare systems. AIM: To investigate both the impact of the Danish lockdown event on psychiatric patients' contact with the healthcare system, stratified by type of contact (FTF or virtual) and ICD-10 diagnosis, and how acute contacts were impacted in the five regions in Denmark. METHODS: An interrupted time series analysis was applied to determine the effect of the COVID-19 lockdown event on the number of contacts with psychiatric hospitals in Denmark, from February 25, 2019 to May 3, 2020. The analyses took a Box-Jenkins approach to fit an autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model. RESULTS: Virtual contacts replaced most FTF contacts during the lockdown. For most patient groups, the total number of contacts did not decrease significantly. However, for adult patients diagnosed with ICD-10 F 0-10, 10-19, and 60-69 and child and adolescent patients diagnosed with F 10-19, 70-79, and 80-89, the number of contacts decreased during lockdown. The number of acute contacts with the psychiatric system decreased significantly in all regions in Denmark during lockdown. DISCUSSION: The Danish healthcare system was forced to introduce innovative tele-psychiatry to mental health care during the lockdown. Disruption to service delivery was minimized because the resources were in place to sustain the transition from FTF to virtual contacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Denmark , Humans , Interrupted Time Series Analysis , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
BMJ Qual Saf ; 30(12): 986-995, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218236

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of a pandemic on unplanned hospital attendance has not been extensively examined. The aim of this study is to report the nationwide consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on unplanned hospital attendances in Denmark for 7 weeks after a 'shelter at home' order was issued. METHODS: We merged data from national registries (Civil Registration System and Patient Registry) to conduct a study of unplanned (excluding outpatient visits and elective surgery) hospital-based healthcare and mortality of all Danes. Using data for 7 weeks after the 'shelter at home' order, the incidence rate of unplanned hospital attendances per week in 2020 was compared with corresponding weeks in 2017-2019. The main outcome was hospital attendances per week as incidence rate ratios. Secondary outcomes were general population mortality and risk of death in-hospital, reported as weekly mortality rate ratios (MRRs). RESULTS: From 2 438 286 attendances in the study period, overall unplanned attendances decreased by up to 21%; attendances excluding COVID-19 were reduced by 31%; non-psychiatric by 31% and psychiatric by 30%. Out of the five most common diagnoses expected to remain stable, only schizophrenia and myocardial infarction remained stable, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation, hip fracture and urinary tract infection fell significantly. The nationwide general population MRR rose in six of the recorded weeks, while MRR excluding patients who were COVID-19 positive only increased in two. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic and a governmental national 'shelter at home' order was associated with a marked reduction in unplanned hospital attendances with an increase in MRR for the general population in two of 7 weeks, despite exclusion of patients with COVID-19. The findings should be taken into consideration when planning for public information campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Emergency Service, Hospital , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Resusc Plus ; 6: 100116, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174480

ABSTRACT

Aim: Use of tele-health programs and wearable sensors that allow patients to monitor their own vital signs have been expanded in response to COVID-19. We aimed to explore the utility of patient-held data during presentation as medical emergencies. Methods: We undertook a systematic scoping review of two groups of studies: studies using non-invasive vital sign monitoring in patients with chronic diseases aimed at preventing unscheduled reviews in primary care, hospitalization or emergency department visits and studies using vital sign measurements from wearable sensors for decision making by clinicians on presentation of these patients as emergencies. Only studies that described a comparator or control group were included. Studies limited to inpatient use of devices were excluded. Results: The initial search resulted in 896 references for screening, nine more studies were identified through searches of references. 26 studies fulfilled inclusion and exclusion criteria and were further analyzed. The majority of studies were from telehealth programs of patients with congestive heart failure or Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. There was limited evidence that patient held data is currently used to risk-stratify the admission or discharge process for medical emergencies. Studies that showed impact on mortality or hospital admission rates measured vital signs at least daily. We identified no interventional study using commercially available sensors in watches or smart phones. Conclusions: Further research is needed to determine utility of patient held monitoring devices to guide management of acute medical emergencies at the patients' home, on presentation to hospital and after discharge back to the community.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...