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1.
Mmwr-Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ; 71(36):1151-1154, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068408

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic? Before emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant, infectious SARS-CoV-2 was unlikely to be cultured at high cycle threshold (Ct) values. Based on this, low Ct values, which are suggestive of high RNA levels, are sometimes used as surrogate markers for infectiousness. What is added by this report? In a longitudinal study including daily nasal swabbing, although Omicron BA.1 sublineage infections exhibited higher Ct values than did pre-Omicron infections, culturable Omicron virus was still detected. Among virus-positive specimens, Ct values were higher for Omicron than for pre-Omicron specimens, especially during the first week of illness. What are the implications for public health practice? Supporting CDC guidance, these data show that Ct values likely do not provide a consistent proxy for infectiousness across SARS-CoV-2 variants.

2.
Mmwr-Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report ; 71(4), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2005028

ABSTRACT

What is already known about this topic? Data are limited regarding the risks for SARS-CoV-2 infection and hospitalization after COVID-19 vaccination and previous infection. What is added by this report? During May-November 2021, case and hospitalization rates were highest among persons who were unvaccinated without a previous diagnosis. Before Delta became the predominant variant in June, case rates were higher among persons who survived a previous infection than persons who were vaccinated alone. By early October, persons who survived a previous infection had lower case rates than persons who were vaccinated alone. What are the implications for public health practice? Although the epidemiology of COVID-19 might change as new variants emerge, vaccination remains the safest strategy for averting future SARS-CoV-2 infections, hospitalizations, long-term sequelae, and death. Primary vaccination, additional doses, and booster doses are recommended for all eligible persons. Additional future recommendations for vaccine doses might be warranted as the virus and immunity levels change.

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