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1.
Vaccines ; 10(4):601, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-1786108

ABSTRACT

Multiple factors may be associated with immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Factors potentially related to magnitude and durability of response include age, time, and vaccine reactogenicity. This study analyzed SARS-CoV-2 IgG spike antibody responses following the second dose of vaccine in healthcare workers (HCWs). Data were collected from participants enrolled in a longitudinal SARS-CoV-2 serology study over a 12-month period. Participants completed a survey documenting symptoms post-vaccination. Serum specimens were tested for SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies using the Abbott Architect AdvisdeDx SARS-CoV-2 IgGII assay. Antibody levels were compared against time from second vaccine dose, and symptoms following vaccination. Altogether, 335 women (86.6%) and 52 men (13.4%) participated. Median age was 37 years (IQR 30-43). Overall median antibody level was 2150.80 [1246.12, 3556.98] AU/mL (IQR). Age was not associated with antibody concentration (p-value = 0.10). Higher antibody responses (2253 AU/mL vs. 1506 AU/mL;p = 0.008) were found in HCWs with one or more symptoms after the second dose of the vaccine (n = 311). Antibody responses persisted throughout the study period post-vaccination;statistically significant decreases in antibody responses were observed over time (p < 0.001). Higher antibody response was associated with reactogenicity post-vaccine. Age and sex were not associated with higher antibody responses.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332385

ABSTRACT

Background: A growing body of evidence attests to the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) during the pandemic. This study asked caregivers about their perceptions of how COVID-19 impacted them and the people they support. Method: An online survey was conducted in 12 countries during August-September 2020 and sought information on demographics, support practices, information and training, experiences of COVID-19, social distancing, and wellbeing, as measured by the DASS12. This study reports on 3,754 family members, direct support professionals, and managers who participated in the survey. Results: : Caregivers observed increases in depression/anxiety, stereotyped behaviours, aggression towards others and weight gain in the person(s) they supported. They also reported difficulties supporting the person(s) to access healthcare.  Families reported reducing or ceasing employment and absorbed additional costs when supporting their family member. Direct support professionals experienced changes in staff shifts, staff absences, increased workload and hiring of casual staff. Caregivers’ wellbeing revealed high levels of stress, depression, and less so anxiety. The strongest predictor of wellbeing among families was observation of changes in mood in the person(s) they supported, while for direct support professionals, the strongest predictors of wellbeing were reorganisation of staff shifts and increases in new direct support staff.  Discussion: Findings support the contention of this population experiencing a disproportionate burden during the COVID-19 pandemic, reflecting historical inequities in access to healthcare and other human rights violations which are now protected under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

3.
Pediatr Qual Saf ; 7(2): e502, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769462

ABSTRACT

More severe presentations of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have been reported during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, possibly due to avoidance of healthcare settings or reduced access to care. To date, no studies have utilized statistical process control to relate temporal COVID-19 events with DKA severity. Our objectives were (1) to determine whether the severity of pediatric DKA presentations changed during COVID-19 and (2) to temporally relate changes in severity with regional pandemic events. Methods: This study was a retrospective chart review of 175 patients younger than 18 years with DKA presenting to a pediatric emergency department in the United States between 5/1/2019 and 8/15/2020. As part of our ongoing clinical standard work in ED management of DKA, DKA severity measures, including presenting pH, the proportion of PICU admissions, and admission length of stay, were analyzed using statistical process control. Results: During COVID-19, we found special cause variation with a downward shift in the mean pH on DKA presentation from 7.2 to 7.1 for all patients. The proportion of DKA patients requiring PICU admission increased from 34.2% to 54.6%. Changes temporally corresponded to the statewide bans on large events (3/11/2020), school closures (3/13/2020), and a reduction in our institution's emergency department volumes. Admission length of stay was unchanged. Conclusions: Pediatric DKA presentations were more severe from March to June 2020, correlating with regional COVID-19 events. Future quality improvement interventions to reduce delayed presentations during COVID-19 surges or other natural disasters should target accessibility of care and public education regarding the importance of timely care for symptoms.

4.
AAACN Viewpoint ; 44(1):4-8, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1695740

ABSTRACT

Current knowledge of COVID-19 suggests outpatient disease management is appropriate for most infected individuals (Cohen & Blau, 2020). [...]many patients are successfully managed remotely with self-isolation and symptom management support (Geenhalgh et al., 2020). Because of this, nurses working in telehealth are uniquely positioned to assist with the care of these patients. The patient population included individuals who were well enough to remain at home with outpatient telehealth follow-up. Since the program's inception (March 19, 2020), care has been provided to more than 21,000 patients. Early in the program it was identified that patient care needs and individual symptom burden varied. [...]the use of a vended telehealth triage resource - already endorsed by the institution - was promoted as a tool to support symptom assessment and guide directions for home care and care escalation.

5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315530

ABSTRACT

Background: This protocol outlines research to explore family members’ and paid staff’s perceptions of the impact of COVID-19 on individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers. Evidence suggests that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities experience disparities in healthcare access and utilisation. This disparity was evident early in the pandemic when discussions arose regarding the potential exclusion of this population to critical care. Methods: : An anonymous online survey will be conducted with caregivers, both family members and paid staff, to explore their perceptions of the impact of COVID-19 in terms of demographics, living arrangements, access to services, social distancing, and carer wellbeing. The survey will be developed by the research team, many of whom are experts in intellectual disability within their own jurisdictions. Using back-translation our team will translate the survey for distribution in 18 countries worldwide for international comparison. The survey team have extensive personal and professional networks and will promote the survey widely on social media with the support of local disability and advocacy agencies. Statistical descriptive and comparative analyses will be conducted. Ethical approval has been obtained for this study from University College Dublin’s Human Research Ethics Committee (HS-20-28-Linehan). Dissemination: Study findings will be prepared in a number of formats in order to meet the needs of different audiences. Outputs will include academic papers, lessons learned paper, practice guidelines, reports, infographics and video content. These outputs will be directed to families, frontline and management delivering disability services, national-level policy makers, healthcare quality and delivery authorities, national pandemic organisations and international bodies.

6.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(12): 4889-4895, 2021 Dec 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522071

ABSTRACT

Vaccinating children against COVID-19 is critical as a public health strategy in order to reach herd immunity and prevent illness among children and adults. The aim of the study was to identify correlation between willingness to vaccinate children under 12 years old, and vaccination rate for adult population in Canada, the United States, and Israel. This was a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey study (COVID-19 Parental Attitude Study) of parents of children 12 years and younger presenting to 12 pediatric emergency departments (EDs). Parental reports of willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 when vaccines for children will be approved was correlated to country-specific rate of vaccination during December 2020-March 2021, obtained from ourworldindata.org. Logistic regression models were fit with covariates for week and the corresponding vaccine rate. A total of 720 surveys were analyzed. In Canada, administering mostly first dose to the adult population, willingness to vaccinate children was trending downward (correlation = -0.28), in the United States, it was trending upwards (correlation = 0.21) and in Israel, initially significant increase with decline shortly thereafter (correlation = 0.06). Odds of willingness to vaccinate in Canada, the United States, and Israel was OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.63-1.07, OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.99-1.56, and OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.95-1.12, respectively. A robust population-based vaccination program as in Israel, and to a lesser degree the United States, led to increasing willingness by parents to vaccinate their children younger than 12 years against COVID-19. In Canada, slow rate of vaccination of the adult population was associated with lower willingness to vaccinate children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Parents , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vaccination
7.
BMJ Open ; 10(11): e040881, 2020 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455706

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Driving is one of the main modes of transport with safe driving requiring a combination of visual, cognitive and physical skills. With population ageing, the number of people living with vision impairment is set to increase in the decades ahead. Vision impairment may negatively impact an individual's ability to safely drive. The association between vision impairment and motor vehicle crash involvement or driving participation has yet to be systematically investigated. Further, the evidence for the effectiveness of vision-related interventions aimed at decreasing crashes and driving errors has not been synthesised. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A search will be conducted for relevant studies on Medline (Ovid), EMBASE and Global Health from their inception to March 2020 without date or geographical restrictions. Two investigators will independently screen abstracts and full texts using Covidence software with conflicts resolved by a third investigator. Data extraction will be conducted on all included studies, and their quality assessed to determine the risk of bias using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tools. Outcome measures include crash risk, driving cessation and surrogate measures of driving safety (eg, driving errors and performance). The results of this review will be reported using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis guideline. Meta-analysis will be undertaken for outcomes with sufficient data and reported following the Meta-analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guideline. Where statistical pooling is not feasible or appropriate, narrative summaries will be presented following the Synthesis Without Meta-analysis in systematic reviews guideline. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This review will only report on published data thus no ethics approval is required. Results will be included in the Lancet Global Health Commission on Global Eye Health, published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at relevant conferences. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020172153.


Subject(s)
Automobile Driving , Accidents, Traffic/prevention & control , Global Health , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Review Literature as Topic , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Vision, Ocular
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444193

ABSTRACT

Vaccines against COVID-19 are likely to be approved for children under 12 years in the near future. Understanding vaccine hesitancy in parents is essential for reaching herd immunity. A cross-sectional survey of caregivers in 12 emergency departments (ED) was undertaken in the U.S., Canada, and Israel. We compared reported willingness to vaccinate children against COVID-19 with an initial survey and post-adult COVID-19 vaccine approval. Multivariable logistic regression models were performed for all children and for those <12 years. A total of 1728 and 1041 surveys were completed in phases 1 and 2, respectively. Fewer caregivers planned to vaccinate against COVID-19 in phase 2 (64.5% and 59.7%, respectively; p = 0.002). The most significant positive predictor of willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19 was if the child was vaccinated per recommended local schedules. Fewer caregivers plan to vaccinate their children against COVID-19, despite vaccine approval for adults, compared to what was reported at the peak of the pandemic. Older caregivers who fully vaccinated their children were more likely to adopt vaccinating children. This study can inform target strategy design to implement adherence to a vaccination campaign.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Caregivers , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
9.
CJEM ; 23(6): 778-786, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359993

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if caregivers of children presenting to pediatric emergency departments (EDs) during the COVID-19 pandemic are delaying presenting to care for fear of contracting COVID-19. METHODS: This was a pre-planned secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey study of caregivers accompanying their children aged 0-19 years to 16 pediatric EDs in 5 countries from May to June 2020. An anonymous online survey, completed by caregivers via RedCAP, included caregiver and child demographics, presenting complaints, if they delayed presentation and whether symptoms worsened during this interval, as well as caregiver concern about the child or caregiver having COVID-19 at the time of ED visit. RESULTS: Of 1543 caregivers completing the survey, 287 (18.6%) reported a delay in seeking ED care due to concerns of contracting COVID-19 in the hospital. Of those, 124 (43.2%) stated their child's symptoms worsened during the waiting interval. Caregiver relationship to child [mother] (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.27-2.76), presence of chronic illness in child (OR 1.78. 95% CI 1.14-2.79), younger age of caregiver (OR 0.965, 95% CI 0.943-0.986), and caregiver concerns about lost work during the pandemic (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04-1.12) were independently associated with a COVID-19-related delayed presentation in multivariable regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Almost one in five caregivers reported delaying ED presentation for their ill or injured child specifically due to fear of contracting COVID-19 while in hospital, with mothers, younger caregivers, caregivers of children with chronic illness, and those concerned about lost work more likely to report delaying ED presentation.


RéSUMé: OBJECTIF: Déterminer si les aidants des enfants qui se présentent aux services d'urgence pédiatriques (SU) pendant la pandémie de COVID-19 retardent leur présentation pour prendre soin d'eux par crainte de contracter la COVID-19. MéTHODES: Il s'agissait d'une analyze secondaire planifiée à l'avance d'une étude d'enquête transversale auprès des soignants accompagnant leurs enfants âgés de 0 à 19 ans dans 16 urgences pédiatriques de 5 pays entre mai et juin 2020. Une enquête anonyme en ligne, remplie par les soignants via RedCAP, comprenait les données démographiques du soignant et de l'enfant, les plaintes présentées, s'ils ont retardé la présentation et si les symptômes se sont aggravés pendant cet intervalle, ainsi que l'inquiétude du soignant quant à la présence de COVID-19 chez l'enfant ou le soignant au moment de la visite aux urgences. RéSULTATS: Sur les 1 543 soignants ayant répondu à l'enquête, 287 (18.6 %) ont déclaré avoir retardé le recours aux urgences par crainte de contracter le COVID-19 à l'hôpital. Parmi eux, 124 (43.2%) ont déclaré que les symptômes de leur enfant s'étaient aggravés pendant l'intervalle d'attente. Dans l'analyse de régression multivariable, le lien entre la personne qui s'occupe de l'enfant et la mère (OR 1.85, IC95 % 1.27­2.76), la présence d'une maladie chronique chez l'enfant (OR 1.78, IC95 % 1.14-2.79), le jeune âge de la personne qui s'occupe de l'enfant (OR 0.965, IC95 % 0.943-0.986) et les préoccupations de la personne qui s'occupe de l'enfant concernant la perte de travail pendant la pandémie (OR 1.08, IC95 % 1.04­1.12) ont été associés de manière indépendante à une présentation tardive. CONCLUSIONS: Près d'un soignant sur cinq a déclaré avoir retardé la présentation aux urgences de son enfant malade ou blessé par crainte de contracter le COVID-19 pendant son séjour à l'hôpital, avec les mères, les jeunes aidants, les soignants d'enfants souffrant de maladies chroniques et les personnes préoccupées par la perte de travail sont plus susceptibles de retarder la présentation aux urgences.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
NPJ Digit Med ; 4(1): 123, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356587

ABSTRACT

Established technology, operational infrastructure, and nursing resources were leveraged to develop a remote patient monitoring (RPM) program for ambulatory management of patients with COVID-19. The program included two care-delivery models with different monitoring capabilities supporting variable levels of patient risk for severe illness. The primary objective of this study was to determine the feasibility and safety of a multisite RPM program for management of acute COVID-19 illness. We report an evaluation of 7074 patients served by the program across 41 US states. Among all patients, the RPM technology engagement rate was 78.9%. Rates of emergency department visit and hospitalization within 30 days of enrollment were 11.4% and 9.4%, respectively, and the 30-day mortality rate was 0.4%. A multisite RPM program for management of acute COVID-19 illness is feasible, safe, and associated with a low mortality rate. Further research and expansion of RPM programs for ambulatory management of other acute illnesses are warranted.

11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(6): 1607-1611, 2021 06 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216567

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has taken an unprecedented global toll and vaccination is needed to restore healthy living. Timely inclusion of children in vaccination trials is critical. We surveyed caregivers of children seeking care in 17 Emergency Departments (ED) across 6 countries during the peak of the pandemic to identify factors associated with intent to participate in COVID-19 vaccine trials. Questions about child and parent characteristics, COVID-19 expressed concerns and parental attitudes toward participation in a trial were asked.Of 2768 completed surveys, 18.4% parents stated they would enroll their child in a clinical trial for a COVID-19 vaccine and 14.4% would agree to a randomized placebo-controlled study. Factors associated with willingness to participate were parents agreeing to enroll in a COVID-19 vaccine trial themselves (Odds Ratio (OR) 32.9, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) (21.9-51.2)) having an older child (OR 1.0 (1.0-1.01)), having children who received all vaccinations based on their country schedule (OR 2.67 (1.35-5.71)) and parents with high school education or lower (OR 1.79 (1.18-2.74)). Mothers were less likely to enroll their child in a trial (OR 0.68 (0.47-0.97)). Only one fifth of families surveyed will consider enrolling their child in a vaccine trial. Parental interest in participation, history of vaccinating their child, and the child being older all are associated with parents allowing their child to participate in a COVID vaccine trial. This information may help decision-makers and researchers shape their strategies for trial design and participation engagement in upcoming COVID19 vaccination trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Parents , Patient Participation/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Child , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
12.
J Pediatr ; 231: 299-300, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185126
14.
Clin Ther ; 42(11): 2124-2133, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023514

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study determined the predictors of caregivers' willingness to accept an accelerated regulatory process for the development of vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: An international cross-sectional survey was administered to 2557 caregivers of children in 17 pediatric emergency departments (EDs) across 6 countries from March 26, 2020, to June 30, 2020. Caregivers were asked to select 1 of 4 choices with which they most agreed regarding a proposed COVID-19 vaccine-approval process, in addition to questions regarding demographic characteristics, the ED visit, and attitudes about COVID-19. Univariate analyses were conducted using the Mann-Whitney U test for comparing non-normally distributed continuous variables, an independent t test for comparing normally distributed continuous variables, and a χ2 or Fisher exact test for categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used for determining independent factors associated with caregivers' willingness to accept abridged development of a COVID-19 vaccine. A P value of <0.05 was considered significant. FINDINGS: Almost half (1101/2557; 43%) of caregivers reported that they were willing to accept less rigorous testing and postresearch approval of a new COVID-19 vaccine. Independent factors associated with caregivers' willingness to accept expedited COVID-19 vaccine research included having children who were up to date on the vaccination schedule (odds ratio [OR] = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.29-2.31), caregivers' concern about having had COVID-19 themselves at the time of survey completion in the ED (OR = 1.1; 95% CI, 1.05-1.16), and caregivers' intent to have their children vaccinated against COVID-19 if a vaccine were to become available (OR = 1.84; 95% CI, 1.54-2.21). Compared with fathers, mothers completing the survey were less likely to approve of changes in the vaccine-development process (OR = 0.641; 95% CI, 0.529-0.775). IMPLICATIONS: Less than half of caregivers in this worldwide sample were willing to accept abbreviated COVID-19 vaccine testing. As a part of an effort to increase acceptance and uptake of a new vaccine, especially in order to protect children, public health strategies and individual providers should understand caregivers' attitudes toward the approval of a vaccine and consult them appropriately.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Caregivers , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Biomedical Research/standards , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Caregivers/psychology , Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Factors
15.
HRB Open Res ; 3: 39, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006821

ABSTRACT

Background: This protocol outlines research to explore the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on individuals who have intellectual and developmental disabilities and their caregivers. Evidence suggests that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities experience disparities in healthcare access and utilisation. This disparity was evident early in the pandemic when discussions arose regarding the potential exclusion of this population to critical care. Methods: An anonymous online survey will be conducted with caregivers, both family members and paid staff, to explore the impact of COVID-19 on this population in terms of demographics, living arrangements, access to services, the impact of social distancing, and also carer wellbeing. The survey will be developed by the research team, many of whom are experts in intellectual disability within their own jurisdictions. Using back-translation our team will translate the survey for distribution in 16 countries worldwide for international comparison. The survey team have extensive personal and professional networks in intellectual disability and will promote the survey widely on social media with the support of local disability and advocacy agencies. Statistical descriptive and comparative analyses will be conducted. Ethical approval has been obtained for this study from University College Dublin's Human Research Ethics Committee (HS-20-28-Linehan). Dissemination: Study findings will be prepared in a number of formats in order to meet the needs of different audiences. Outputs will include academic papers, lessons learned paper, practice guidelines, reports, infographics and video content. These outputs will be directed to families, frontline and management delivering disability services, national-level policy makers, healthcare quality and delivery authorities, national pandemic organisations and international bodies.

16.
Hosp Pediatr ; 11(3): e48-e53, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999865

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Asymptomatic transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in health care settings is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in health care and hospital workers (HCHWs) and assess how antibody levels change over time. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of employed HCHWs at a freestanding, urban pediatric tertiary care hospital. Employed HCHWs ≥18 years old who were asymptomatic and worked in clinical hospital locations were eligible to participate. Participants completed blood draws and surveys at baseline (between May 4, 2020, and June 2, 2020) and 2 months later (between July 6, 2020, and August 7, 2020). Surveys collected demographic information, SARS-CoV-2 exposures, and previous COVID-19 diagnosis. RESULTS: In total, 530 participants enrolled in and completed baseline study activities. The median age was 37 years (range 19-67 years); 86% identified as female, and 80% identified as white. Two months later, 481 (91%) HCHWs completed another survey and blood draw. Four of 5 (0.9%) seropositive subjects at baseline remained seropositive at 2 months, although 3 had decreasing IgG indices. Five (1.0%) seropositive individuals, including 4 who were previously seropositive and 1 newly seropositive, were detected 2 months later. History of positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction testing results (P < .001) and history of COVID-19 exposure (P < .001) were associated with presence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were detected in 1% of HCHWs in an urban pediatric hospital in a city with moderate SARS-CoV-2 prevalence. Participants with a known previous COVID-19 diagnosis showed a decline or loss of IgG antibodies over 2 months. These results have implications for identifying those with previous exposure and for ongoing public health recommendations for ensuring workplace safety.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hospitals, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
17.
Vaccine ; 38(48): 7668-7673, 2020 11 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-872530

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More than 100 COVID-19 vaccine candidates are in development since the SARS-CoV-2 genetic sequence was published in January 2020. The uptake of a COVID-19 vaccine among children will be instrumental in limiting the spread of the disease as herd immunity may require vaccine coverage of up to 80% of the population. Prior history of pandemic vaccine coverage was as low as 40% among children in the United States during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. PURPOSE: To investigate predictors associated with global caregivers' intent to vaccinate their children against COVID-19, when the vaccine becomes available. METHOD: An international cross sectional survey of 1541 caregivers arriving with their children to 16 pediatric Emergency Departments (ED) across six countries from March 26 to May 31, 2020. RESULTS: 65% (n = 1005) of caregivers reported that they intend to vaccinate their child against COVID-19, once a vaccine is available. A univariate and subsequent multivariate analysis found that increased intended uptake was associated with children that were older, children with no chronic illness, when fathers completed the survey, children up-to-date on their vaccination schedule, recent history of vaccination against influenza, and caregivers concerned their child had COVID-19 at the time of survey completion in the ED. The most common reason reported by caregivers intending to vaccinate was to protect their child (62%), and the most common reason reported by caregivers refusing vaccination was the vaccine's novelty (52%). CONCLUSIONS: The majority of caregivers intend to vaccinate their children against COVID-19, though uptake will likely be associated with specific factors such as child and caregiver demographics and vaccination history. Public health strategies need to address barriers to uptake by providing evidence about an upcoming COVID-19 vaccine's safety and efficacy, highlighting the risks and consequences of infection in children, and educating caregivers on the role of vaccination.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Viral Vaccines/economics , Adult , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunity, Herd , International Cooperation , Israel/epidemiology , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Multivariate Analysis , North America/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Viral Vaccines/biosynthesis
18.
J Pediatr ; 228: 87-93.e2, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-765223

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine factors associated with parents who plan to vaccinate their children against influenza next year, especially those who did not vaccinate against influenza last year using a global survey. STUDY DESIGN: A survey of caregivers accompanying their children aged 1-19 years old in 17 pediatric emergency departments in 6 countries at the peak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Anonymous online survey included caregiver and child demographic information, vaccination history and future intentions, and concern about the child and caregiver having COVID-19 at the time of emergency department visit. RESULTS: Of 2422 surveys, 1314 (54.2%) caregivers stated they plan to vaccinate their child against influenza next year, an increase of 15.8% from the previous year. Of 1459 caregivers who did not vaccinate their children last year, 418 (28.6%) plan to do so next year. Factors predicting willingness to change and vaccinate included child's up-to-date vaccination status (aOR 2.03, 95% CI 1.29-3.32, P = .003); caregivers' influenza vaccine history (aOR 3.26, 95% CI 2.41-4.40, P < .010), and level of concern their child had COVID-19 (aOR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17, P = .022). CONCLUSIONS: Changes in risk perception due to COVID-19, and previous vaccination, may serve to influence decision-making among caregivers regarding influenza vaccination in the coming season. To promote influenza vaccination among children, public health programs can leverage this information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Vaccination , Adolescent , Caregivers , Child , Child, Preschool , Decision Making , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Immunization Programs , Infant , Infant, Newborn , International Cooperation , Male , Parents , Public Health , Risk , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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