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1.
Acad Radiol ; 28(1): 106-111, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1023391

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted radiology departments across the country. The pandemic has also disrupted resident education, both due to departmental social distancing efforts and reduced imaging volumes. The purpose of this study was to assess the differential impact the pandemic had on radiology resident imaging volumes by training year and imaging modality. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All signed radiology resident reports were curated during defined prepandemic and intrapandemic time periods. Imaging case volumes were analyzed on a mean per resident basis to quantify absolute and percent change by training level. Change in total volume by imaging modality was also assessed. The number of resident workdays assigned outside the normal reading room was also calculated. RESULTS: Overall percent decline in resident imaging interpretation volume from the prepandemic to intrapandemic time period was 62.8%. R1s and R2s had the greatest decline at 87.3% and 64.3%, respectively. Mammography, MRI and nuclear medicine had the greatest decline in resident interpretation volume at 92.0%, 73.2%, and 73.0%, respectively. During the intrapandemic time period, a total of 478 resident days (mean of 14.5 days per resident) were reassigned outside of the radiology reading room. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic caused a marked decrease in radiology resident imaging interpretation volume and has had a tremendous impact on resident education. The decrease in case interpretation, as well as in-person teaching has profound implications for resident education. Knowledge of this differential decrease by training level will help residency programs plan for the future.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Internship and Residency , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiology/education , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Clin Imaging ; 73: 38-42, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-956985

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, efforts by radiology departments to protect patients and healthcare workers and mitigate disease spread have reduced imaging volumes. This study aims to quantify the pandemic's impact on physician productivity across radiology practice areas as measured by physician work Relative Value Units (wRVUs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: All signed diagnostic and procedural radiology reports were curated from January 1st to July 1st of 2019 and 2020. Physician work RVUs were assigned to each study type based on the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Utilizing divisional assignments, radiologist schedules were mapped to each report to generate a sum of wRVUs credited to that division for each week. Differential impact on divisions were calculated relative to a matched timeframe in 2019 and a same length pre-pandemic time period in 2020. RESULTS: All practice areas saw a substantial decrease in wRVUs from the 2020 pre- to intra-pandemic time period with a mean decrease of 51.5% (range 15.4%-76.9%). The largest declines were in Breast imaging, Musculoskeletal, and Neuroradiology, which had decreases of 76.9%, 75.3%, and 67.5%, respectively. The modalities with the greatest percentage decrease were mammography, MRI, and non-PET nuclear medicine. CONCLUSION: All radiology practice areas and modalities experienced a substantial decrease in wRVUs. The greatest decline was in Breast imaging, Neuroradiology, and Musculoskeletal radiology. Understanding the differential impact of the pandemic on practice areas will help radiology departments prepare for the potential depth and duration of the pandemic by better understanding staffing needs and the financial effects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Radiology , Aged , Humans , Medicare , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
3.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(9): 1086-1095, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-680404

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in significant loss of radiologic volume as a result of shelter-at-home mandates and delay of non-time-sensitive imaging studies to preserve capacity for the pandemic. We analyze the volume-related impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on six academic medical systems (AMSs), three in high COVID-19 surge (high-surge) and three in low COVID-19 surge (low-surge) regions, and a large national private practice coalition. We sought to assess adaptations, risks of actions, and lessons learned. METHODS: Percent change of 2020 volume per week was compared with the corresponding 2019 volume calculated for each of the 14 imaging modalities and overall total, outpatient, emergency, and inpatient studies in high-surge AMSs and low-surge AMSs and the practice coalition. RESULTS: Steep examination volume drops occurred during week 11, with slow recovery starting week 17. The lowest total AMS volume drop was 40% compared with the same period the previous year, and the largest was 70%. The greatest decreases were seen with screening mammography and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans, and the smallest decreases were seen with PET/CT, x-ray, and interventional radiology. Inpatient volume was least impacted compared with outpatient or emergency imaging. CONCLUSION: Large percentage drops in volume were seen from weeks 11 through 17, were seen with screening studies, and were larger for the high-surge AMSs than for the low-surge AMSs. The lowest drops in volume were seen with modalities in which delays in imaging had greater perceived adverse consequences.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnostic Imaging/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/statistics & numerical data , Radiology/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diagnostic Imaging/methods , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Incidence , Learning , Male , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiology/trends , Risk Assessment , United States
4.
J Am Coll Radiol ; 17(9): 1101-1107, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-660724

ABSTRACT

This article presents a current snapshot in time, describing how radiology departments around the country are planning recovery from the baseline of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, with a focus on different domains of recovery such as managing appointment availability, patient safety and workflow changes, and operational data and analytics. An e-mail survey was sent through the Society of Chairs of Academic Radiology Departments list server to 114 academic radiology departments. On the basis of data reported by the 38 survey respondents, best practices and shared experience are described for three key areas: (1) planning for recovery, (2) creating a new normal, and (3) measuring and forecasting. Radiology practices should be aware of the common approaches and preparations academic radiology departments have taken to reopening imaging in the post-coronavirus disease 2019 world. This should all be done when maintaining a safe and patient-centric environment and preparing to minimize the impact of future outbreaks or pandemics.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Radiology/organization & administration , Workflow , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Reference Values , Societies, Medical , United States
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