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1.
J Clin Med ; 11(2)2022 Jan 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625939

ABSTRACT

We aim to describe the incidence and source of contagion of COVID-19 in patients with IBD, as well as the risk factors for a severe course and long-term sequelae. This is a prospective observational study of IBD and COVID-19 included in the ENEIDA registry (53,682 from 73 centres) between March-July 2020 followed-up for 12 months. Results were compared with data of the general population (National Centre of Epidemiology and Catalonia). A total of 482 patients with COVID-19 were identified. Twenty-eight percent were infected in the work environment, and 48% were infected by intrafamilial transmission, despite having good adherence to lockdown. Thirty-five percent required hospitalization, 7.9% had severe COVID-19 and 3.7% died. Similar data were reported in the general population (hospitalisation 19.5%, ICU 2.1% and mortality 4.6%). Factors related to death and severe COVID-19 were being aged ≥ 60 years (OR 7.1, 95% CI: 1.8-27 and 4.5, 95% CI: 1.3-15.9), while having ≥2 comorbidities increased mortality (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 1.3-11.6). None of the drugs for IBD were related to severe COVID-19. Immunosuppression was definitively stopped in 1% of patients at 12 months. The prognosis of COVID-19 in IBD, even in immunosuppressed patients, is similar to that in the general population. Thus, there is no need for more strict protection measures in IBD.

2.
J Clin Invest ; 131(23)2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546628

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThere is considerable variability in COVID-19 outcomes among younger adults, and some of this variation may be due to genetic predisposition.MethodsWe combined individual level data from 13,888 COVID-19 patients (n = 7185 hospitalized) from 17 cohorts in 9 countries to assess the association of the major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor (chromosome 3 locus tagged by rs10490770) with mortality, COVID-19-related complications, and laboratory values. We next performed metaanalyses using FinnGen and the Columbia University COVID-19 Biobank.ResultsWe found that rs10490770 risk allele carriers experienced an increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR, 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Risk allele carriers had increased odds of several COVID-19 complications: severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.6-2.6), venous thromboembolism (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2-2.4), and hepatic injury (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-2.0). Risk allele carriers age 60 years and younger had higher odds of death or severe respiratory failure (OR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.8-3.9) compared with those of more than 60 years (OR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.2-1.8; interaction, P = 0.038). Among individuals 60 years and younger who died or experienced severe respiratory failure, 32.3% were risk-variant carriers compared with 13.9% of those not experiencing these outcomes. This risk variant improved the prediction of death or severe respiratory failure similarly to, or better than, most established clinical risk factors.ConclusionsThe major common COVID-19 genetic risk factor is associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, which are more pronounced among individuals 60 years or younger. The effect was similar in magnitude and more common than most established clinical risk factors, suggesting potential implications for future clinical risk management.


Subject(s)
Alleles , COVID-19 , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Gene Frequency , Genetic Loci , Polymorphism, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2 , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acuity , Risk Factors
3.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 2021 Sep 08.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450111

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 pandemic increased medical services demand aside from interrupting daily clinical practice for other diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we present the results of a survey to gain the perception of IBD specialists in their patient-management using telemedicine in their daily practice. METHODS: This was an observational survey study among physicians focused on IBD (gastroenterologist, surgeons, and pediatricians) members of the Spanish Working Group on Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis (GETECCU), the Spanish Association of Gastroenterology (AEG), and the Spanish Association of Coloproctology (AECP), regarding changes of management of IBD patients. RESULTS: We received a total of 269 responses to the survey (from May to June 2020). Before the pandemic, nearly all the respondents reported performing very frequently their visits face-to-face (n=251, 93.3%) while, during the pandemic, the telephone visits were the most frequent visits performed (n=138, 51.3%). Regarding communication difficulties, 157 (58.4%) respondents reported the impossibility of performing a proper examination as the most relevant issue. Also, 114 (42.4%) respondents considered remote visits more time-consuming than face-to-face visits. Most gastroenterologists (n=188, 83.2%) considered patients with active perianal disease in special need of face-to-face consultation and more than half of the surgeons (n=35, 50.7%) reported having performed an immediate postoperative follow-up remotely. CONCLUSIONS: Most IBD units have implemented remote visits during the pandemic, but most professionals found them more time-consuming and unsuitable for some disease profiles. Therefore, there is a need for the development of better telemedicine systems that can meet professionals' and patients' requirements.

4.
Gastroenterología y Hepatología (English Edition) ; 43(6):332-347, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1385593

ABSTRACT

The set of measures proposed by SEPD, AEEH, GETECCU and AEG are aimed to help departments in their resumption of usual activity. We have prepared a number of practical recommendations regarding patient management and the stepwise resumption of healthcare activity. These recommendations are based on the sparse, changing evidence available, and will be updated in the future according to daily needs and the availability of expendable materials to suit them;in each department they will be implemented depending upon the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in each region, and the burden the pandemic has represented for each hospital. The general objectives of these recommendations include: • To protect our patients against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and to provide them with high-quality care. • To protect all healthcare professionals against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2. • To resume normal functioning of our departments in a setting of ongoing risk for infection with SARS-CoV-2. Resumen El artículo recoge el conjunto de medidas propuestas por la SEPD, la AEEH, GETECCU y la AEG que pretenden servir de ayuda a los servicios en su reincorporación a la actividad habitual. Hemos confeccionado una serie de recomendaciones prácticas respecto al manejo y a la reintroducción progresiva de la actividad asistencial. Estas recomendaciones están guiadas por la escasa y cambiante evidencia disponible y serán objeto de futuras actualizaciones, en base a las necesidades diarias y la disponibilidad del material fungible para adecuarse a las mismas;y se podrán implementar en cada servicio en función de la incidencia acumulada de SARS-CoV-2 en cada región y de la carga que la epidemia ha ocasionado en cada uno de los hospitales. Los objetivos generales de estas recomendaciones son: • Proteger a nuestros pacientes de los riesgos de la infección por SARS-CoV-2 y prestarles una atención de calidad. • Proteger a todos los profesionales sanitarios de los riesgos de la infección por SARS-CoV-2. • Recuperar el normal funcionamiento de nuestros servicios en un entorno de riesgo continuado de infección por SARS-CoV-2.

5.
Int J Infect Dis ; 110: 114-122, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349465

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the relationship between antibody status and cycle threshold (Ct) values, the prognostic value of the latter for COVID-19 patients, and the inter-assay comparability of SARS-CoV-2 Ct values. METHODS: In 347 COVID-19 inpatients, SARS-CoV-2 Ct values (via reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction) on admission were compared between 2 assays and correlated with the antibody response (in the course of the disease), the clinical course and the time since onset of symptoms. RESULTS: Ct values for 2 of 3 target genes showed significant differences between the 2 assays used (P=0.012 and P<0.0001). Ct values were significantly higher for antibody positive patients (P<0.0001) and positively correlated with the amount of time since onset of symptoms (R: 0.332-0.363; P<0.001). Patients with fatal outcomes showed higher viral loads than survivors (P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Ct values depend strongly on assay used and target gene examined and should not be used as quantitative values to guide therapeutic or diagnostic decisions. The inverse association between antibody status and viral load suggests that antibodies contribute to the elimination of the virus, independent of the outcome, which is influenced by the viral load on admission and might depend more strongly on other parts of the immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Incidence , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reverse Transcription , Viral Load
6.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 4363, 2021 02 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099351

ABSTRACT

Laboratory testing for the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) consists of two pillars: the detection of viral RNA via rt-PCR as the diagnostic gold standard in acute cases, and the detection of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2. However, concerning the latter, questions remain about their diagnostic and prognostic value and it is not clear whether all patients develop detectable antibodies. We examined sera from 347 Spanish COVID-19 patients, collected during the peak of the epidemic outbreak in Spain, for the presence of IgA and IgG antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 and evaluated possible associations with age, sex and disease severity (as measured by duration of hospitalization, kind of respiratory support, treatment in ICU and death). The presence and to some degree the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies depended mainly on the amount of time between onset of symptoms and the collection of serum. A subgroup of patients did not develop antibodies at the time of sample collection. Compared to the patients that did, no differences were found. The presence and level of antibodies was not associated with age, sex, duration of hospitalization, treatment in the ICU or death. The case-fatality rate increased exponentially with older age. Neither the presence, nor the levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies served as prognostic markers in our cohort. This is discussed as a possible consequence of the timing of the sample collection. Age is the most important risk factor for an adverse outcome in our cohort. Some patients appear not to develop antibodies within a reasonable time frame. It is unclear, however, why that is, as these patients differ in no respect examined by us from those who developed antibodies.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Spain
7.
Rev Esp Enferm Dig ; 112(5): 397-411, 2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-101938

ABSTRACT

The set of measures proposed by SEPD, AEEH, GETECCU and AEG are aimed to help departments in their resumption of usual activity. We have prepared a number of practical recommendations regarding patient management and the stepwise resumption of healthcare activity. These recommendations are based on the sparse, changing evidence available, and will be updated in the future according to daily needs and the availability of expendable materials to suit them; in each department they will be implemented depending upon the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in each region, and the burden the pandemic has represented for each hospital. The general objectives of these recommendations include: • To protect our patients against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and to provide them with high-quality care. • To protect all healthcare professionals against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2. • To resume normal functioning of our departments in a setting of ongoing risk for infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Gastroenterology/standards , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Patient Care Management , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Guidelines as Topic
10.
N Engl J Med ; 383(16): 1522-1534, 2020 10 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-606974

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is considerable variation in disease behavior among patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19). Genomewide association analysis may allow for the identification of potential genetic factors involved in the development of Covid-19. METHODS: We conducted a genomewide association study involving 1980 patients with Covid-19 and severe disease (defined as respiratory failure) at seven hospitals in the Italian and Spanish epicenters of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in Europe. After quality control and the exclusion of population outliers, 835 patients and 1255 control participants from Italy and 775 patients and 950 control participants from Spain were included in the final analysis. In total, we analyzed 8,582,968 single-nucleotide polymorphisms and conducted a meta-analysis of the two case-control panels. RESULTS: We detected cross-replicating associations with rs11385942 at locus 3p21.31 and with rs657152 at locus 9q34.2, which were significant at the genomewide level (P<5×10-8) in the meta-analysis of the two case-control panels (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.48 to 2.11; P = 1.15×10-10; and odds ratio, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.47; P = 4.95×10-8, respectively). At locus 3p21.31, the association signal spanned the genes SLC6A20, LZTFL1, CCR9, FYCO1, CXCR6 and XCR1. The association signal at locus 9q34.2 coincided with the ABO blood group locus; in this cohort, a blood-group-specific analysis showed a higher risk in blood group A than in other blood groups (odds ratio, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.20 to 1.75; P = 1.48×10-4) and a protective effect in blood group O as compared with other blood groups (odds ratio, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.53 to 0.79; P = 1.06×10-5). CONCLUSIONS: We identified a 3p21.31 gene cluster as a genetic susceptibility locus in patients with Covid-19 with respiratory failure and confirmed a potential involvement of the ABO blood-group system. (Funded by Stein Erik Hagen and others.).


Subject(s)
ABO Blood-Group System/genetics , Betacoronavirus , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 3/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide , Respiratory Insufficiency/genetics , Aged , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Genetic Loci , Genome-Wide Association Study , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Multigene Family , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain
11.
Gastroenterol Hepatol ; 43(6): 332-347, 2020.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-116776

ABSTRACT

The set of measures proposed by SEPD, AEEH, GETECCU and AEG are aimed to help departments in their resumption of usual activity. We have prepared a number of practical recommendations regarding patient management and the stepwise resumption of healthcare activity. These recommendations are based on the sparse, changing evidence available, and will be updated in the future according to daily needs and the availability of expendable materials to suit them; in each department they will be implemented depending upon the cumulative incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in each region, and the burden the pandemic has represented for each hospital. The general objectives of these recommendations include: (a)To protect our patients against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2 and to provide them with high-quality care. (b)To protect all healthcare professionals against the risks of infection with SARS-CoV-2. (c)To resume normal functioning of our departments in a setting of ongoing risk for infection with SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gastroenterology/organization & administration , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Infection Control/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Clinical Trials as Topic , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Diagnostic Techniques, Digestive System/instrumentation , Digestive System Diseases/complications , Digestive System Diseases/diagnosis , Digestive System Diseases/therapy , Disinfection , Drug Interactions , Equipment Contamination/prevention & control , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Liver Transplantation , Mass Screening/organization & administration , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Protective Devices , Symptom Assessment , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Universal Precautions
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