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1.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 16(11): e0010887, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109281

ABSTRACT

Malaysia has reported 2.75 million cases and 31,485 deaths as of 30 December 2021. Underestimation remains an issue due to the underdiagnosis of mild and asymptomatic cases. We aimed to estimate the burden of COVID-19 cases in Malaysia based on an adjusted case fatality rate (aCFR). Data on reported cases and mortalities were collated from the Ministry of Health official GitHub between 1 March 2020 and 30 December 2021. We estimated the total and age-stratified monthly incidence rates, mortality rates, and aCFR. Estimated new infections were inferred from the age-stratified aCFR. The total estimated infections between 1 March 2020 and 30 December 2021 was 9,955,000-cases (95% CI: 6,626,000-18,985,000). The proportion of COVID-19 infections in ages 0-11, 12-17, 18-50, 51-65, and above 65 years were 19.9% (n = 1,982,000), 2.4% (n = 236,000), 66.1% (n = 6,577,000), 9.1% (n = 901,000), 2.6% (n = 256,000), respectively. Approximately 32.8% of the total population in Malaysia was estimated to have been infected with COVID-19 by the end of December 2021. These estimations highlight a more accurate infection burden in Malaysia. It provides the first national-level prevalence estimates in Malaysia that adjusted for underdiagnosis. Naturally acquired community immunity has increased, but approximately 68.1% of the population remains susceptible. Population estimates of the infection burden are critical to determine the need for booster doses and calibration of public health measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Infant, Newborn , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Malaysia/epidemiology , Incidence , Prevalence
2.
PLoS One ; 17(8): e0273364, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009697

ABSTRACT

Patients with COVID-19 usually recover and return to normal health, however some patients may have symptoms that last for weeks or even months after recovery. This persistent state of ill health is known as Long COVID if it continues for more than three months and are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. Long Covid has been overlooked, especially in the low- and middle-income countries. Therefore, we conducted an online survey among the COVID-19 survivors in the community to explore their Long COVID symptoms, factors associated with Long COVID and how Long COVID affected their work. A total of 732 COVID-19 survivors responded, with 56% were without or with mild symptoms during their acute COVID-19 conditions. One in five COVID-19 survivors reported of experiencing Long COVID. The most commonly reported symptoms were fatigue, brain fog, depression, anxiety and insomnia. Females had 58% higher odds (95% CI: 1.02, 2.45) of experiencing Long COVID. Patients with moderate and severe levels of acute COVID-19 symptoms had OR of 3.01 (95% CI: 1.21, 7.47) and 3.62 (95% CI: 1.31, 10.03) respectively for Long COVID. Recognition of Long COVID and its associated factors is important in planning prevention, rehabilitation, clinical management to improve recovery from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Pneumonia, Viral , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Survivors
3.
Asia Pac J Public Health ; 34(5): 561-564, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854664

ABSTRACT

Cases and death counts rise as the world continues to scuffle with the COVID-19 pandemic and its catastrophic effects. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at a heightened risk of developing psychological distress during the pandemic as a result of extreme work demands and poor experiences of recovery. This study aimed to evaluate the mental health outcomes of HCWs in hospitals during the pandemic and explore the associated psychosocial, individual, and work-related factors of depression and anxiety among them. The present study employed a cross-sectional survey study design. Participants from the Department of Medicine, Department of Surgery, and Department of Emergency were recruited via an online based questionnaire. A validated screening tool, the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) questionnaire was utilized to assess the status of anxiety and depression among the HCWs. The prevalence of anxiety and depression among the HCWs were 12.2% and 1.4%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analysis further demonstrated that being male (OR = 1.581) and having work-related stigma was significantly associated with anxiety (OR = 2.635).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence
5.
Asia Pac J Public Health ; 34(2-3): 244-246, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1573921

ABSTRACT

Malaysia was slow to begin its COVID-19 immunization program for various reasons. However, it is one of the fastest developing countries to vaccinate 80% of its adult population. Nontraditional health leadership played a large role in the implementation of the National COVID-19 Immunisation Programme (NCIP). Independent opinions from academia also helped the NCIP and may be useful as a way of pushing forward recommendations that may otherwise be difficult to make.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Immunization Programs , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Leadership , Malaysia , Vaccination
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154379

ABSTRACT

To curb the spread of SARS-CoV-2 virus (COVID-19) in Malaysia, the government imposed a nationwide movement control order (MCO) from 18 March 2020 to 3 May 2020. It was enforced in four phases (i.e., MCO 1, MCO 2, MCO 3 and MCO 4). In this paper, we propose an initiative to assess the impact of MCO by using time-varying reproduction number (Rt). We used data from the Johns Hopkins University Centre for Systems Science and Engineering Coronavirus repository. Day 1 was taken from the first assumed local transmission of COVID-19. We estimated Rt by using the EpiEstim package and plotted the epidemic curve and Rt. Then, we extracted the mean Rt at day 1, day 5 and day 10 for all MCO phases and compared the differences. The Rt values peaked around day 43, which was shortly before the start of MCO 1. The means for Rt at day 1, day 5, and day 10 for all MCOs ranged between 0.665 and 1.147. The average Rt gradually decreased in MCO 1 and MCO 2. Although spikes in the number of confirmed cases were observed when restrictions were gradually relaxed in the later MCO phases, the situation remained under control with Rt values being stabilised to below unity level (Rt value less than one).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Basic Reproduction Number , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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