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1.
J Clin Med ; 11(2)2022 Jan 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625032

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The psychological impact of COVID-19 is multifaceted, both acute and chronic, and has not affected everyone equally. METHOD: This longitudinal study compared those with and without Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on measures of psychological distress and wellbeing over time. RESULTS: All groups (No ACE, Low ACE, and High ACE) had similar levels of distress at Time 1, with significant increases in psychological distress for those with ACEs over time, but not for those without. Psychological Flexibility was strongly and significantly associated with decreases in psychological distress and improved wellbeing. It significantly mediated the relationship between ACE and wellbeing. CONCLUSIONS: Those with ACEs report significantly increased psychological distress over time, compared to those without ACE during the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence-based interventions using Psychological Flexibility may improve mental health and wellbeing to help further mediate its effects.

2.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(12): e14941, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1450551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This longitudinal cohort study aimed to examine the impact of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ireland on parents of children with externalising difficulties, in comparison to parents of children without such difficulties. METHOD: Parents of 159 children completed online self-report measures at three time points during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic; (a) Delay and Mitigation Phase (March 2020 to May 2020), (b) Reopening of Society Phase (June 2020 to July 2020) and (c) Wave 2 Case Acceleration Phase (September 2020 to October 2020). Participants were allocated to the clinical group if they met the clinical cut off point on the Conduct or Hyperactivity/Inattention subscales of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire at Time 1. RESULTS: Parents of children with externalising difficulties experienced significantly higher levels of stress, lower levels of wellbeing and engaged in higher levels of avoidant-focused coping strategies longitudinally. There was a significant difference between outcomes at the different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, for stress related to parenting, personal/family stress related to the impact of the COVID-19 and type of coping strategies employed. Children with externalising difficulties, in comparison to children without externalising difficulties, showed significantly greater adjustment over time for behavioural and emotional difficulties, as reported by their parents. CONCLUSIONS: Results provide important information regarding the trajectory of psychological outcomes in parents of children with externalising difficulties over the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the need for increased parental supports during, and after, the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Cohort Studies , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(9): e28766, 2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443964

ABSTRACT

Despite recent and potent technological advances, the real-world implementation of remote digital health technology in the care and monitoring of patients with motor neuron disease has not yet been realized. Digital health technology may increase the accessibility to and personalization of care, whereas remote biosensors could optimize the collection of vital clinical parameters, irrespective of patients' ability to visit the clinic. To facilitate the wide-scale adoption of digital health care technology and to align current initiatives, we outline a road map that will identify clinically relevant digital parameters; mediate the development of benefit-to-burden criteria for innovative technology; and direct the validation, harmonization, and adoption of digital health care technology in real-world settings. We define two key end products of the road map: (1) a set of reliable digital parameters to capture data collected under free-living conditions that reflect patient-centric measures and facilitate clinical decision making and (2) an integrated, open-source system that provides personalized feedback to patients, health care providers, clinical researchers, and caregivers and is linked to a flexible and adaptable platform that integrates patient data in real time. Given the ever-changing care needs of patients and the relentless progression rate of motor neuron disease, the adoption of digital health care technology will significantly benefit the delivery of care and accelerate the development of effective treatments.


Subject(s)
Motor Neuron Disease , Biomedical Technology , Caregivers , Health Personnel , Humans , Motor Neuron Disease/diagnosis , Motor Neuron Disease/therapy , Technology
4.
Randall, Ashley K.; Leon, Gabriel, Basili, Emanuele, Martos, Tamás, Boiger, Michael, Baldi, Michela, Hocker, Lauren, Kline, Kai, Masturzi, Alessio, Aryeetey, Richmond, Bar-Kalifa, Eran, Boon, Susan D.; Botella, Luis, Burke, Tom, Carnelley, Katherine, Carr, Alan, Dash, Arobindu, Fitriana, Mimi, Gaines, Stanley O.; Galdiolo, Sarah, Claire M, Hart, Joo, Susanna, Kanth, Barani, Karademas, Evangelos, Karantzas, Gery, Landolt, Selina A.; McHugh, Louise, Milek, Anne, Murphy, Eddie, Natividade, Jean C.; Portugal, Alda, Quiñones, Álvaro, Relvas, Ana Paula, Rumondor, Pingkan C. B.; Rusu, Petruta, Sallay, Viola, Saul, Luis Angel, Schmitt, David P.; Sels, Laura, Shujja, Sultan, Taylor, Laura K.; Ozguluk, S. Burcu, Verhofstadt, Leslie, Yoo, Gyesook, Zemp, Martina, Donato, Silvia, Totenhagen, Casey J.; van Eickels, Rahel L.; Anaba, Emmanuel Anongeba, Beauchemin-Roy, Sarah, Berry, Anna, Brassard, Audrey, Chesterman, Susan, Ferguson, Lizzie, Fonseca, Gabriela, Gaugue, Justine, Geonet, Marie, Hermesch, Neele, Knox, Laura, Lafontaine, Marie-France, Lawless, Nicholas, Londero-Santos, Amanda, Major, Sofia, Marot, Tiago A.; Mullins, Ellie, Otermans, Pauldy C. J.; Ariela F, Pagani, Parise, Miriam, Parvin, Roksana, De, Mallika, Péloquin, Katherine, Rebelo, Bárbara, Righetti, Francesca, Romano, Daniel, Salavati, Sara, Samrock, Steven, Serea, Mary, Seok, Chua Bee, Sotero, Luciana, Stafford, Owen, Thomadakis, Christoforos, Topcu-Uzer, Cigdem, Ugarte, Carla, Yun, Low Wah, Simon-Zámbori, Petra, Siau, Ching Sin, Duca, Diana-Sînziana, Filip, Cornelia, Park, Hayoung, Wearen, Sinead, Bodenmann, Guy, Chiarolanza, Claudia.
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships ; : 02654075211034236, 2021.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1374048

ABSTRACT

Following the global outbreak of COVID-19 in March 2020, individuals report psychological distress associated with the ?new normal??social distancing, financial hardships, and increased responsibilities while working from home. Given the interpersonal nature of stress and coping responses between romantic partners, based on the systemic transactional model this study posits that perceived partner dyadic coping may be an important moderator between experiences of COVID-19 psychological distress and relationship quality. To examine these associations, self-report data from 14,020 people across 27 countries were collected during the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic (March?July, 2020). It was hypothesized that higher symptoms of psychological distress would be reported post-COVID-19 compared to pre-COVID-19 restrictions (Hypothesis 1), reports of post-COVID-19 psychological distress would be negatively associated with relationship quality (Hypothesis 2), and perceived partner DC would moderate these associations (Hypothesis 3). While hypotheses were generally supported, results also showed interesting between-country variability. Limitations and future directions are presented.

5.
Ir J Psychol Med ; 38(4): 272-277, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189154

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The unprecedented occurrence of a global pandemic is accompanied by both physical and psychological burdens that may impair quality of life. Research relating to COVID-19 aims to determine the effects of the pandemic on vulnerable populations who are at high risk of developing negative health or psychosocial outcomes. Having an ongoing medical condition during a pandemic may lead to greater psychological distress. Increased psychological distress may be due to preventative public health measures (e.g. lockdown), having an ongoing medical condition, or a combination of these factors. METHODS: This study analyses data from an online cross-sectional national survey of adults in Ireland and investigates the relationship between comorbidity and psychological distress. Those with a medical condition (n = 128) were compared to a control group without a medical condition (n = 128) and matched according to age, gender, annual income, education, and work status during COVID-19. Participants and data were obtained during the first public lockdown in Ireland (27 March 2020-8 June 2020). RESULTS: Individuals with existing medical conditions reported significantly higher levels of anxiety (p < .01) and felt less gratitude (p ≤ .001). Exploratory analysis indicated that anxiety levels were significantly associated with illness perceptions specific to COVID-19. Post hoc analysis revealed that psychological well-being was not significantly related to condition type (e.g. respiratory disorders). CONCLUSION: This research supports individualised supports for people with ongoing medical conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, and has implications for the consideration of follow-up care specifically for mental health. Findings may also inform future public health policies and post-vaccine support strategies for vulnerable populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Clin Med ; 9(11)2020 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895383

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The emergence of the coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) resulted in a global pandemic. The psychological impact of an epidemic is multifaceted and acute, with long-term consequences. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey-based design was employed, assessing the psychological impact of COVID-19 on members of the Irish public during the quarantine period of COVID-19 in Ireland. Participants were invited to complete the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) retrospectively (prior to quarantine) and during the quarantine period, as well as measures of illness perceptions, well-being, and a bespoke measure (the Effects of COVID Questionnaire, ECQ), which assessed perceptions of COVID-related stresses associated with personal concerns, caring for children, caring for aging parents, as well as gratitude. RESULTS: A total of n = 1620 entered the survey platform, with a total of n = 847 surveys completed by members of the Irish public. Entry into COVID-19 quarantine was associated with significant increases in clinically significant symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety. The ECQ reliably assessed a range of COVID-19-related stresses and had large and significant correlations with the DASS-21. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 quarantine was associated with stresses and significant increases in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress in a national Irish cohort. The public require increased access to mental health services to meet this increase in COVID-19-related psychological distress.

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