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1.
Pers Individ Dif ; 189: 111475, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586889

ABSTRACT

Individual differences can shape the way major life events are experienced. In this study, we explored the unique and interactive effects of depressive symptoms and sense of purpose on downstream appraisals of a COVID-19 college campus shutdown. Data were from a sample of U.S. college students (n = 152) surveyed prior to widespread COVID-19 transmission (Time 1; early fall 2019), and again just after their university closed as a protective measure (Time 2; mid-spring 2020). Depressive symptoms were positively associated, whereas sense of purpose was negatively associated, with cross-sectional reports of social status change due to shutdown. Depressive symptoms at Time 1 positively predicted perceived external control of the situation at Time 2, and sense of purpose at Time 1 positively predicted changes to worldview at Time 2. Purpose and depressive symptoms evidenced high rank-order stability from Time 1 to Time 2. This study represents a rare documentation of college students' feelings and experiences before, and during, a historical moment. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

2.
Perspect Psychol Sci ; 17(2): 311-333, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443726

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has extensively changed the state of psychological science from what research questions psychologists can ask to which methodologies psychologists can use to investigate them. In this article, we offer a perspective on how to optimize new research in the pandemic's wake. Because this pandemic is inherently a social phenomenon-an event that hinges on human-to-human contact-we focus on socially relevant subfields of psychology. We highlight specific psychological phenomena that have likely shifted as a result of the pandemic and discuss theoretical, methodological, and practical considerations of conducting research on these phenomena. After this discussion, we evaluate metascientific issues that have been amplified by the pandemic. We aim to demonstrate how theoretically grounded views on the COVID-19 pandemic can help make psychological science stronger-not weaker-in its wake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Soc Sci Med ; 284: 114193, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294245

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Despite the clear public health significance of herd immunity to COVID-19, a host of individual differences influence willingness to get vaccinated. One factor likely to motivate individuals is the extent they have a sense of purpose in life, based on the health correlates of purpose and purposeful individuals' desire to return to their pre-pandemic environments. OBJECTIVE: The current study examined sense of purpose as a predictor of COVID-19 vaccination willingness in the United States immediately following the initial approval of a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States in 2020. METHODS: A nationwide sample of U. S. adults (N = 2009) completed a poll including information on their sense of purpose in life, demographic factors, and depressive symptoms, immediately following the initial approval of a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States in 2020. In addition, they reported on how willing they would be to get the vaccine, assuming that the costs would be covered, as well as their motivations to get the vaccine. RESULTS: Multiple regression analyses found that sense of purpose predicted greater willingness to get vaccinated, even when accounting for demographic factors, political affiliation, and psychological wellbeing. Adults higher on sense of purpose reported greater importance of getting the vaccine for personal health, the health of others, and to return to regular activities. Exploratory analyses also suggest that purpose may provide a stronger impetus to vaccinate among those in age groups associated with lower risk for severe COVID-19 complications. CONCLUSIONS: Although cross-sectional in nature, the current findings suggest sense of purpose in life may be an important factor in encouraging vaccination. Implications are discussed regarding how purposeful messaging may yield greater vaccination rates among individuals who otherwise may be less motivated due to health concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vaccination
4.
Psychol Health ; : 1-17, 2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223196

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Sense of purpose has been associated with greater health and well-being, even in daily contexts. However, it is unclear whether effects would hold in daily life during COVID-19, when people may have difficulty seeing a path towards their life goals. DESIGN: The current study investigated whether purposefulness predicted daily positive affect, negative affect, and physical symptoms. Participants (n = 831) reported on these variables during the first weeks of the COVID-19 response in North America. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participants completed daily surveys asking them for daily positive events, stressors, positive affect, negative affect, physical symptoms, and purposefulness. RESULTS: Purposefulness at between- and within-person levels predicted less negative affect and physical symptoms, but more positive affect at the daily level. Between-person purposefulness interacted with positive events when predicting negative and positive affect, suggesting that purposeful people may be less reactive to positive events. However, between-person purposefulness also interacted with daily stressors, insofar that stressors predicted greater declines in positive affect for purposeful people. CONCLUSION: Being a purposeful person holds positive implications for daily health and well-being, even during the pandemic context. However, purposefulness may hold some consequences unique to the COVID-19 context, which merit attention in future research.

5.
6.
J Environ Psychol ; 69: 101436, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823178

ABSTRACT

Psychological research suggests a sense of purpose in life is a coveted asset, with well-established linkages to well-being and healthy functioning. But how do individuals preserve this sense when previously reliable settings - and the opportunities they afford - are profoundly disrupted? The current moment provides a formidable test of this question, as widespread transmission of Covid-19 and intense efforts to slow it drastically transform our environment. Here, we consider how the experience of purpose may be impacted by disruptions in three key person-environment interactions: how we engage with work, how we engage in education, and how we manage physical proximity. We hope to motivate critical thinking about how this pandemic, and our collective responses to it, influence the experience of purpose and delineate a research agenda that may inform how individuals' can preserve a sense of engagement and contribution.

7.
Psychiatry Res ; 289: 113093, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-245570
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