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1.
J Immigr Minor Health ; 2023 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20233658

ABSTRACT

In March 2021, Emergency Intake Sites (EIS) were created to address capacity shortfalls during a surge of Unaccompanied Children at the Mexico-United States land border. The COVID-19 Zone Plan (ZP) was developed to decrease COVID-19 transmission. COVID-19 cumulative percent (%) positivity was analyzed to evaluate the impact of the ZP, venue type and bed capacity across EIS from April 1-May 31, 2021. Results: Of 11 EIS sites analyzed, 54% implemented the recommended ZP. The overall % positivity was 2.47% (95% CI 2.39-2.55). The % positivity at EIS with the ZP, 1.83% (95% CI 1.71-1.95), was lower than that at EIS without the ZP, 2.83%, ( 95% CI 2.72-2.93), and showed a lower 7-day moving average of % positivity. Conclusion: Results showed a possible effect of the ZP on % positivity when controlling for venue type and bed capacity in a specific EIS group comparison, indicating that all three variables could have had effect on % positivity. They also showed that smaller intake facilities may be recommendable during public health emergencies.

2.
PLoS One ; 18(2): e0282095, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2278559

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cross-border use of health services is an important aspect of life in border regions. Little is known about the cross-border use of health services in neighboring low- and middle-income countries. Understanding use of health services in contexts of high cross-border mobility, such as at the Mexico-Guatemala border, is crucial for national health systems planning. This article aims to describe the characteristics of the cross-border use of health care services by transborder populations at the Mexico-Guatemala border, as well as the sociodemographic and health-related variables associated with use. METHODS: Between September-November 2021, we conducted a cross-sectional survey using a probability (time-venue) sampling design at the Mexico-Guatemala border. We conducted a descriptive analysis of cross-border use of health services and assessed the association of use with sociodemographic and mobility characteristics by means of logistic regressions. RESULTS: A total of 6,991 participants were included in this analysis; 82.9% were Guatemalans living in Guatemala, 9.2% were Guatemalans living in Mexico, 7.8% were Mexicans living in Mexico, and 0.16% were Mexicans living in Guatemala. 2.6% of all participants reported having a health problem in the past two weeks, of whom 58.1% received care. Guatemalans living in Guatemala were the only group reporting cross-border use of health services. In multivariate analyses, Guatemalans living in Guatemala working in Mexico (compared to not working in Mexico) (OR 3.45; 95% CI 1.02,11.65), and working in agriculture/cattle, industry, or construction while in Mexico (compared to working in other sectors) (OR 26.67; 95% CI 1.97,360.85), were associated with cross-border use. CONCLUSIONS: Cross-border use of health services in this region is related to transborder work (i.e., circumstantial use of cross-border health services). This points to the importance of considering the health needs of migrant workers in Mexican health policies and developing strategies to facilitate and increase their access to health services.


Subject(s)
Health Services , Transients and Migrants , Animals , Cattle , Humans , Mexico , Guatemala , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Services Accessibility
3.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1060861, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268622

ABSTRACT

Aim: In Mexico, as in other societies, migrants are seen as over-users of health services. However, the extent, distribution, and trends of use over time are unknown. Evidence is needed to inform health policies and improve health services for foreign patients. The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with the distribution and trends of Mexican and foreign resident hospitalizations in Mexican public hospitals from 2010 to 2020. Methods: A graphical and statistical analysis (descriptive and correlational) of discharge trends in public hospitals was carried out. Hospitalization trends were analyzed by country of habitual residence (Mexico, US, Central and South America, and Other Continents), age, sex, primary discharge category, and region of service delivery. Adjusted Poisson modeling was used to examine the factors associated with annual hospitalizations of Mexican and foreign residents. Results: Between 2010 and 2020, there were 26,780,808 hospitalizations in Mexican public hospitals. Of these, 0.05% were of foreign residents. Hospitalizations for Mexican residents remained stable from 2010 to 2019, while those for foreign residents trended upward over the same period. In 2020, hospitalizations of Mexican residents fell by 36.6%, while foreign resident hospitalizations fell by 348.8%. The distribution of hospitalizations by sex was higher among females for all categories of habitual residence, except among US residents. Obstetric discharges were the most common reason for hospitalization among Mexican residents (42.45%), Central and South American residents (42.24%), and residents from Other Continents (13.73%). The average hospital stay was 2 days. Poisson regression confirmed these results, showing that hospitalizations was higher among women (except among foreign residents) and in the ≤ 17 age group. Poisson modeling also showed that trauma injury was the leading cause of discharge for foreign residents after obstetric causes. Discussion: It is unlikely the upward trend in hospitalizations among foreign residents in Mexico from 2010 to 2019 affected the Mexican public health system, given the small proportion (0.05%) of hospitalizations and the brief length of hospital stay. The increased number of hospitalizations during the study period may be explained by local and national measures to facilitate foreign residents' access to hospital services, while the decrease in hospital utilization in 2020 is likely associated with COVID-19. Geographic location and the most frequent primary discharge categories of hospitalizations within each population could provide evidence for modifications to public health policy in Mexico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transients and Migrants , Pregnancy , Humans , Female , Mexico/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Length of Stay
4.
Frontiers in public health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2232419

ABSTRACT

Aim In Mexico, as in other societies, migrants are seen as over-users of health services. However, the extent, distribution, and trends of use over time are unknown. Evidence is needed to inform health policies and improve health services for foreign patients. The objective of this study was to examine factors associated with the distribution and trends of Mexican and foreign resident hospitalizations in Mexican public hospitals from 2010 to 2020. Methods A graphical and statistical analysis (descriptive and correlational) of discharge trends in public hospitals was carried out. Hospitalization trends were analyzed by country of habitual residence (Mexico, US, Central and South America, and Other Continents), age, sex, primary discharge category, and region of service delivery. Adjusted Poisson modeling was used to examine the factors associated with annual hospitalizations of Mexican and foreign residents. Results Between 2010 and 2020, there were 26,780,808 hospitalizations in Mexican public hospitals. Of these, 0.05% were of foreign residents. Hospitalizations for Mexican residents remained stable from 2010 to 2019, while those for foreign residents trended upward over the same period. In 2020, hospitalizations of Mexican residents fell by 36.6%, while foreign resident hospitalizations fell by 348.8%. The distribution of hospitalizations by sex was higher among females for all categories of habitual residence, except among US residents. Obstetric discharges were the most common reason for hospitalization among Mexican residents (42.45%), Central and South American residents (42.24%), and residents from Other Continents (13.73%). The average hospital stay was 2 days. Poisson regression confirmed these results, showing that hospitalizations was higher among women (except among foreign residents) and in the ≤ 17 age group. Poisson modeling also showed that trauma injury was the leading cause of discharge for foreign residents after obstetric causes. Discussion It is unlikely the upward trend in hospitalizations among foreign residents in Mexico from 2010 to 2019 affected the Mexican public health system, given the small proportion (0.05%) of hospitalizations and the brief length of hospital stay. The increased number of hospitalizations during the study period may be explained by local and national measures to facilitate foreign residents' access to hospital services, while the decrease in hospital utilization in 2020 is likely associated with COVID-19. Geographic location and the most frequent primary discharge categories of hospitalizations within each population could provide evidence for modifications to public health policy in Mexico.

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