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1.
Archivos de bronconeumologia ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1801724

ABSTRACT

Introduction The COVID-19 pandemic created tremendous challenges for health-care systems. Intensive care units (ICU) were hit with a large volume of patients requiring ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and other organ support with very high mortality. The Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red-Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), a network of Spanish researchers to investigate in respiratory disease, commissioned the current proposal in response to the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) call. Methods CIBERESUCICOVID is a multicenter, observational, prospective/retrospective cohort study of patients with COVID-19 admitted to Spanish ICUs. Several work packages were created, including study population and ICU data collection, follow-up, biomarkers and miRNAs, data management and quality. Results This study included 6102 consecutive patients admitted to 55 ICUs homogeneously distributed throughout Spain and the collection of blood samples from more than 1000 patients. We enrolled a large population of COVID-19 ICU-admitted patients including baseline characteristics, ICU and MV data, treatments complications, and outcomes. The in-hospital mortality was 31%, and 76% of patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. A 3-6 month and 1 year follow-up was performed. Few deaths after 1 year discharge were registered. Low anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels predict mortality in critical COVID-19. These antibodies contribute to prevent systemic dissemination of SARS-CoV-2. The severity of COVID-19 impacts the circulating miRNA profile. Plasma miRNA profiling emerges as a useful tool for risk-based patient stratification in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Conclusions We present the methodology used in a large multicenter study sponsored by ISCIII to determine the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with COVID-19 admitted to more than 50 Spanish ICUs.

2.
Archivos de Bronconeumología ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1797167

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic created tremendous challenges for health-care systems. Intensive care units (ICU) were hit with a large volume of patients requiring ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and other organ support with very high mortality. The Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red-Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), a network of Spanish researchers to investigate in respiratory disease, commissioned the current proposal in response to the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) call. Methods: CIBERESUCICOVID is a multicenter, observational, prospective/retrospective cohort study of patients with COVID-19 admitted to Spanish ICUs. Several work packages were created, including study population and ICU data collection, follow-up, biomarkers and miRNAs, data management and quality. Results: This study included 6102 consecutive patients admitted to 55 ICUs homogeneously distributed throughout Spain and the collection of blood samples from more than 1000 patients. We enrolled a large population of COVID-19 ICU-admitted patients including baseline characteristics, ICU and MV data, treatments complications, and outcomes. The in-hospital mortality was 31%, and 76% of patients required invasive mechanical ventilation. A 3-6 month and 1 year follow-up was performed. Few deaths after 1 year discharge were registered. Low anti-SARS-CoV-2 S antibody levels predict mortality in critical COVID-19. These antibodies contribute to prevent systemic dissemination of SARS-CoV-2. The severity of COVID-19 impacts the circulating miRNA profile. Plasma miRNA profiling emerges as a useful tool for risk-based patient stratification in critically ill COVID-19 patients. Conclusions: We present the methodology used in a large multicenter study sponsored by ISCIII to determine the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with COVID-19 admitted to more than 50 Spanish ICUs. RESUMEN Introducción: La pandemia de COVID-19 ha supuesto un enorme reto para los sistemas sanitarios. Las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) se han visto afectadas por un gran volumen de pacientes que requerían ingreso en la UCI, ventilación mecánica y otras asistencias de órganos con gran mortalidad. El Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red-Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES), una red de investigadores españoles para el estudio de enfermedades respiratorias, encargó la presente propuesta en respuesta a la convocatoria del Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII). Métodos: CIBERESUCICOVID es un estudio de cohortes multicéntrico, observacional, prospectivo/retrospectivo de pacientes con COVID-19 ingresados en UCI españolas. Se crearon varios paquetes de trabajo: población de estudio y recogida de datos en la UCI, seguimiento, biomarcadores y miRNA, gestión de datos y calidad. Resultados: Este estudio incluyó a 6.102 pacientes consecutivos ingresados en 55 UCI distribuidas homogéneamente por toda España, y se recogieron muestras de sangre de más de 1.000 pacientes. Se incluyó a una amplia población de pacientes ingresados en UCI de COVID-19, y se registraron las características basales, los datos de la UCI y la ventilación mecánica, las complicaciones de los tratamientos y los resultados. La mortalidad hospitalaria fue del 31%, y el 76% de los pacientes requirieron ventilación mecánica invasiva. Se realizó un seguimiento de 3-6 meses y de 1 año. Se registraron pocas muertes después del alta a 1 año. Las bajas cifras de anticuerpos anti-SARS-CoV-2 S predicen la mortalidad en la COVID-19 crítica. Estos anticuerpos contribuyen a prevenir la diseminación sistémica del SARS-CoV-2. La gravedad de la COVID-19 influye en el perfil de miRNA circulantes. El perfil de miRNA plasmático emerge como un dato útil para la estratificación basada en el riesgo de los pacientes con COVID-19 en estado crítico. Conclusiones: Se presenta la metodología utilizada en un gran estudio multicéntrico patrocinado por el ISCIII para determinar los resultados a corto y largo plazo en pacientes con COVID-19 ingresados en más de 50 UCI españolas.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316534

ABSTRACT

Background: . Some patients who had previously presented with COVID-19 have been reported to develop persistent COVID-19 symptoms. Whilst this information has been adequately recognised and extensively published with respect to non-critically ill patients, less is known about the prevalence and risk factors and characteristics of persistent COVID_19 . On other hand these patients have very often intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP). A second infectious hit after COVID increases the length of ICU stay and mechanical ventilation and could have an influence in the poor health post-Covid 19 syndrome in ICU discharged patients Methods: This prospective, multicentre and observational study was done across 40 selected ICUs in Spain. Consecutive patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission were recruited and evaluated three months after hospital discharge. Results: A total of 1,255 ICU patients were scheduled to be followed up at 3 months;however, the final cohort comprised 991 (78.9%) patients. A total of 315 patients developed ICUAP (97% of them had ventilated ICUAP) Patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation had persistent, post-COVID-19 symptoms than those who did not require mechanical ventilation. Female sex, duration of ICU stay, and development of ICUAP were independent risk factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. Conclusions: : Persistent, post-COVID-19 symptoms occurred in more than two-thirds of patients. Female sex, duration of ICU stay and the onset of ICUAP comprised all independent risk factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. Prevention of ICUAP could have beneficial effects in poor health post-Covid 19

5.
J Clin Med ; 11(1)2021 Dec 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580629

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Some patients previously presenting with COVID-19 have been reported to develop persistent COVID-19 symptoms. While this information has been adequately recognised and extensively published with respect to non-critically ill patients, less is known about the incidence and factors associated with the characteristics of persistent COVID-19. On the other hand, these patients very often have intensive care unit-acquired pneumonia (ICUAP). A second infectious hit after COVID increases the length of ICU stay and mechanical ventilation and could have an influence on poor health post-COVID 19 syndrome in ICU-discharged patients. METHODS: This prospective, multicentre, and observational study was carrid out across 40 selected ICUs in Spain. Consecutive patients with COVID-19 requiring ICU admission were recruited and evaluated three months after hospital discharge. RESULTS: A total of 1255 ICU patients were scheduled to be followed up at 3 months; however, the final cohort comprised 991 (78.9%) patients. A total of 315 patients developed ICUAP (97% of them had ventilated ICUAP). Patients requiring invasive mechanical ventilation had more persistent post-COVID-19 symptoms than those who did not require mechanical ventilation. Female sex, duration of ICU stay, development of ICUAP, and ARDS were independent factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Persistent post-COVID-19 symptoms occurred in more than two-thirds of patients. Female sex, duration of ICU stay, development of ICUAP, and ARDS all comprised independent factors for persistent poor health post-COVID-19. Prevention of ICUAP could have beneficial effects in poor health post-COVID-19.

6.
Crit Care ; 25(1): 331, 2021 09 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413915

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mortality due to COVID-19 is high, especially in patients requiring mechanical ventilation. The purpose of the study is to investigate associations between mortality and variables measured during the first three days of mechanical ventilation in patients with COVID-19 intubated at ICU admission. METHODS: Multicenter, observational, cohort study includes consecutive patients with COVID-19 admitted to 44 Spanish ICUs between February 25 and July 31, 2020, who required intubation at ICU admission and mechanical ventilation for more than three days. We collected demographic and clinical data prior to admission; information about clinical evolution at days 1 and 3 of mechanical ventilation; and outcomes. RESULTS: Of the 2,095 patients with COVID-19 admitted to the ICU, 1,118 (53.3%) were intubated at day 1 and remained under mechanical ventilation at day three. From days 1 to 3, PaO2/FiO2 increased from 115.6 [80.0-171.2] to 180.0 [135.4-227.9] mmHg and the ventilatory ratio from 1.73 [1.33-2.25] to 1.96 [1.61-2.40]. In-hospital mortality was 38.7%. A higher increase between ICU admission and day 3 in the ventilatory ratio (OR 1.04 [CI 1.01-1.07], p = 0.030) and creatinine levels (OR 1.05 [CI 1.01-1.09], p = 0.005) and a lower increase in platelet counts (OR 0.96 [CI 0.93-1.00], p = 0.037) were independently associated with a higher risk of death. No association between mortality and the PaO2/FiO2 variation was observed (OR 0.99 [CI 0.95 to 1.02], p = 0.47). CONCLUSIONS: Higher ventilatory ratio and its increase at day 3 is associated with mortality in patients with COVID-19 receiving mechanical ventilation at ICU admission. No association was found in the PaO2/FiO2 variation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Ventilation-Perfusion Ratio/physiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/trends , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Pulmonary Ventilation/physiology , Respiration, Artificial/trends , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Retrospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology
7.
Transl Res ; 236: 147-159, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243239

ABSTRACT

We aimed to examine the circulating microRNA (miRNA) profile of hospitalized COVID-19 patients and evaluate its potential as a source of biomarkers for the management of the disease. This was an observational and multicenter study that included 84 patients with a positive nasopharyngeal swab Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for SARS-CoV-2 recruited during the first pandemic wave in Spain (March-June 2020). Patients were stratified according to disease severity: hospitalized patients admitted to the clinical wards without requiring critical care and patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). An additional study was completed including ICU nonsurvivors and survivors. Plasma miRNA profiling was performed using reverse transcription polymerase quantitative chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Predictive models were constructed using least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) regression. Ten circulating miRNAs were dysregulated in ICU patients compared to ward patients. LASSO analysis identified a signature of three miRNAs (miR-148a-3p, miR-451a and miR-486-5p) that distinguishes between ICU and ward patients [AUC (95% CI) = 0.89 (0.81-0.97)]. Among critically ill patients, six miRNAs were downregulated between nonsurvivors and survivors. A signature based on two miRNAs (miR-192-5p and miR-323a-3p) differentiated ICU nonsurvivors from survivors [AUC (95% CI) = 0.80 (0.64-0.96)]. The discriminatory potential of the signature was higher than that observed for laboratory parameters such as leukocyte counts, C-reactive protein (CRP) or D-dimer [maximum AUC (95% CI) for these variables = 0.73 (0.55-0.92)]. miRNA levels were correlated with the duration of ICU stay. Specific circulating miRNA profiles are associated with the severity of COVID-19. Plasma miRNA signatures emerge as a novel tool to assist in the early prediction of vital status deterioration among ICU patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/genetics , Circulating MicroRNA/blood , Hospitalization , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
8.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 615312, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-993382

ABSTRACT

Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Corona Virus 2 has generated significant impact on global health worldwide. COVID-19 can cause pneumonia and organ injury. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been associated with increased mortality in previous epidemics, but there is a paucity of data regarding actual risks for non-dialysis CKD patients with COVID-19. Methods: Multicenter, observational cohort study including 136 non-dialysis CKD patients and 136 age- and sex-matched controls that required hospitalization due to COVID-19. Patients with end-stage renal disease, a kidney transplant or without registered baseline glomerular filtration rate prior to COVID-19 infection were excluded. CKD and acute kidney injury (AKI) were defined according to KDIGO criteria. Results: CKD patients had higher white blood cell count and D-dimer and lower lymphocyte percentage. No differences were found regarding symptoms on admission. CKD was associated with higher rate of AKI (61 vs. 24.3%) and mortality (40.4 vs. 24.3%). Patients with AKI had the highest hazard for death (AKI/non-CKD HR:7.04, 95% CI:2.87-17.29; AKI/CKD HR:5.25, 95% CI: 2.29-12.02), followed by CKD subjects without AKI (HR:3.39, 95% CI:1.36-8.46). CKD status did not condition ICU admission or length of in-hospital stay. Conclusions: CKD patients that require hospitalization due to COVID-19 are exposed to higher risk of death and AKI.

9.
Front Neurol ; 11: 781, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-686052

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Prognosis of Coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) patients with vascular risk factors, and certain comorbidities is worse. The impact of chronic neurological disorders (CND) on prognosis is unclear. We evaluated if the presence of CND in Covid-19 patients is a predictor of a higher in-hospital mortality. As secondary endpoints, we analyzed the association between CND, Covid-19 severity, and laboratory abnormalities during admission. Methods: Retrospective cohort study that included all the consecutive hospitalized patients with confirmed Covid-19 disease from March 8th to April 11th, 2020. The study setting was Hospital Clínico, tertiary academic hospital from Valladolid. CND was defined as those neurological conditions causing permanent disability. We assessed demography, clinical variables, Covid-19 severity, laboratory parameters and outcome. The primary endpoint was in-hospital all-cause mortality, evaluated by multivariate cox-regression log rank test. We analyzed the association between CND, covid-19 severity and laboratory abnormalities. Results: We included 576 patients, 43.3% female, aged 67.2 years in mean. CND were present in 105 (18.3%) patients. Patients with CND were older, more disabled, had more vascular risk factors and comorbidities and fewer clinical symptoms of Covid-19. They presented 1.43 days earlier to the emergency department. Need of ventilation support was similar. Presence of CND was an independent predictor of death (HR 2.129, 95% CI: 1.382-3.280) but not a severer Covid-19 disease (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 0.970-3.158). Frequency of laboratory abnormalities was similar, except for procalcitonin and INR. Conclusions: The presence of CND is an independent predictor of mortality in hospitalized Covid-19 patients. That was not explained neither by a worse immune response to Covid-19 nor by differences in the level of care received by patients with CND.

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