Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
International Journal of Stroke ; 17(2 Supplement):8-9, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2079342

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted modern healthcare and delayed time to acute stroke treatment at some centres internationally. The effect of the pandemic on time metrics in patients with a large vessel occlusion (LVO) at Australian stroke centres is unknown. Aim(s): To evaluate time metrics for patients with an LVO transferred from a primary stroke centre (PSC) to a comprehensive stroke centre (CSC), during and before the coronavirus pandemic. Method(s): Retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with an LVO who were transferred from a single PSC to any of three CSCs were enrolled. The pandemic period was defined as the 24 months following the March 2020 state of emergency declaration in Melbourne, and prepandemic period the preceding 24 months. "Door-in" was the time triaged as a stroke, and "Door-out" was the time ambulance staff departed. Result(s): 159 patients were included, 82 in the pandemic group and 77 in the pre-pandemic group. There were no significant differences between groups in patient age, sex, modified Rankin scale score, or National Institute of Health Stroke Scale score. Door-in to Door-out (DIDO) times were reduced during the pandemic (median 52 vs 66 minutes, IQR 41-66 vs 52-95 minutes, p<0.001). There was no change in time from PSC Door-in to the first CSC DSA images (median 125 vs 125 minutes, p=0.79). Within the DIDO workflow, the only significantly different metric was time from CSC advising of patient acceptance to PSC door-out, which improved (median 8 vs 14 minutes, p=0.016). DIDO times out of hours when the stroke registrar was called in also improved (median 51 vs 87 minutes, p=0.003). Conclusion(s): The median DIDO times at our PSC improved during the pandemic. Further studies are required to determine if this is due to a continued quality improvement program at our centre, or due to other factors.

3.
European Stroke Journal ; 7(1 SUPPL):455, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1928075

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: National clinical quality registries facilitate reliable monitoring of stroke care by providing local hospital teams with data on their performance compared to national benchmarks. We aimed to assess changes in stroke care over time from public hospitals participating in the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry (AuSCR). Methods: AuSCR stroke quality care indicators were compared between 2017 and 2020, using a matched-hospital design. Analyses were limited to adults with stroke or transient ischaemic attack admitted to hospitals contributing ≥30 episodes each year during the study period. Descriptive statistics and linear tests for trend were used to assess changes in quality indicators across years. Results: Among 47 eligible hospitals, admissions increased from 13,508 (2017) to 18,139 (2020). Overall, half were aged ≥75 years, 45% were female, and 59% had a severe stroke (no differences by year). Between 2017 and 2020, improvements were observed for: endovascular retrieval (+8%;P<0.001), hyperacute antithrombotics (+6%;P<0.001), mobilisation during admission (+3%;P<0.001), swallow screen/assessment within 4 hours (+12%;P<0.001), discharge care planning (+11%;P<0.001), and discharge secondary prevention medications (+10%;P<0.001). However, delivery of thrombolysis remained unchanged (-1%;P=0.07), door-toneedle within 60 minutes decreased (-6%;P=0.008), and access to stroke unit care declined in 2020 (76% 2019 vs 72% 2020;P<0.001). Conclusion: Improvements in many indicators of quality stroke care have been observed within Australian hospitals participating in a national registry. Declines in timeliness to thrombolysis and access to stroke units in 2020 represent a likely consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic that requires national action.

4.
Hortscience ; 56(9):S229-S229, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1688465
5.
Hortscience ; 56(9):S229-S229, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1688057
6.
Horttechnology ; 32(1):32-38, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1667889

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic altered the way many consumers and businesses transacted business. Concerning the green industry, many households began gardening and/or purchased more green industry products. As the pandemic ends and households begin to return to normal, green industry firms need to understand this new normal. Using an online national survey of households, we assessed which households were more likely to remain in the market after entering during the height of the pandemic (2020). Findings indicated that younger consumers (i.e., Millennials and younger individuals who were born in 1985 or after) were less likely to indicate they always garden (before the pandemic) but more likely to have started gardening during the pandemic and perceived that they would not continue to garden as states returned to normal (2021). This age group was also more likely to not have gardened in 2020, but they intended to garden in 2021. This finding shows a dichotomy in gardening preferences in this young age group. Further findings indicated that race, household income, number of children in the household, and the impact of the pandemic on the household also help explain the household's decision to garden or not.

7.
Nguyen, T.; Qureshi, M.; Martins, S.; Yamagami, H.; Qiu, Z.; Mansour, O.; Czlonkowska, A.; Abdalkader, M.; Sathya, A.; de Sousa, D. A.; Demeestere, J.; Mikulik, R.; Vanacker, P.; Siegler, J.; Korv, J.; Biller, J.; Liang, C.; Sangha, N.; Zha, A.; Czap, A.; Holmstedt, C.; Turan, T.; Grant, C.; Ntaios, G.; Malhotra, K.; Tayal, A.; Loochtan, A.; Mistry, E.; Alexandrov, A.; Huang, D.; Yaghi, S.; Raz, E.; Sheth, S.; Frankel, M.; Lamou, E. G. B.; Aref, H.; Elbassiouny, A.; Hassan, F.; Mustafa, W.; Menecie, T.; Shokri, H.; Roushdy, T.; Sarfo, F. S.; Alabi, T.; Arabambi, B.; Nwazor, E.; Sunmonu, T. A.; Wahab, K. W.; Mohammed, H. H.; Adebayo, P. B.; Riahi, A.; Ben Sassi, S.; Gwaunza, L.; Rahman, A.; Ai, Z. B.; Bai, F. H.; Duan, Z. H.; Hao, Y. G.; Huang, W. G.; Li, G. W.; Li, W.; Liu, G. Z.; Luo, J.; Shang, X. J.; Sui, Y.; Tian, L.; Wen, H. B.; Wu, B.; Yan, Y. Y.; Yuan, Z. Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W. L.; Zi, W. J.; Leung, T. K.; Sahakyan, D.; Chugh, C.; Huded, V.; Menon, B.; Pandian, J.; Sylaja, P. N.; Usman, F. S.; Farhoudi, M.; Sadeghi-Hokmabadi, E.; Reznik, A.; Sivan-Hoffman, R.; Horev, A.; Ohara, N.; Sakai, N.; Watanabe, D.; Yamamoto, R.; Doijiri, R.; Tokuda, N.; Yamada, T.; Terasaki, T.; Yazawa, Y.; Uwatoko, T.; Dembo, T.; Shimizu, H.; Sugiura, Y.; Miyashita, F.; Fukuda, H.; Miyake, K.; Shimbo, J.; Sugimura, Y.; Yagita, Y.; Takenobu, Y.; Matsumaru, Y.; Yamada, S.; Kono, R.; Kanamaru, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakaguchi, M.; Todo, K.; Yamamoto, N.; Sonodda, K.; Yoshida, T.; Hashimoto, H.; Nakahara, I.; Faizullina, K.; Kamenova, S.; Kondybayeva, A.; Zhanuzakov, M.; Baek, J. H.; Hwang, Y.; Lee, S. B.; Moon, J.; Park, H.; Seo, J. H.; Seo, K. D.; Young, C. J.; Ahdab, R.; Aziz, Z. A.; Zaidi, W. A. W.; Bin Basri, H.; Chung, L. W.; Husin, M.; Ibrahim, A. B.; Ibrahim, K. A.; Looi, I.; Tan, W. Y.; Yahya, Wnnw, Groppa, S.; Leahu, P.; Al Hashmi, A.; Imam, Y. Z.; Akhtar, N.; Oliver, C.; Kandyba, D.; Alhazzani, A.; Al-Jehani, H.; Tham, C. H.; Mamauag, M. J.; Narayanaswamy, R.; Chen, C. H.; Tang, S. C.; Churojana, A.; Aykac, O.; Ozdemir, A. O.; Hussain, S. I.; John, S.; Vu, H. L.; Tran, A. D.; Nguyen, H. H.; Thong, P. N.; Nguyen, T.; Nguyen, T.; Gattringer, T.; Enzinger, C.; Killer-Oberpfalzer, M.; Bellante, F.; De Blauwe, S.; Van Hooren, G.; De Raedt, S.; Dusart, A.; Ligot, N.; Rutgers, M.; Yperzeele, L.; Alexiev, F.; Sakelarova, T.; Bedekovic, M. R.; Budincevic, H.; Cindric, I.; Hucika, Z.; Ozretic, D.; Saric, M. S.; Pfeifer, F.; Karpowicz, I.; Cernik, D.; Sramek, M.; Skoda, M.; Hlavacova, H.; Klecka, L.; Koutny, M.; Vaclavik, D.; Skoda, O.; Fiksa, J.; Hanelova, K.; Nevsimalova, M.; Rezek, R.; Prochazka, P.; Krejstova, G.; Neumann, J.; Vachova, M.; Brzezanski, H.; Hlinovsky, D.; Tenora, D.; Jura, R.; Jurak, L.; Novak, J.; Novak, A.; Topinka, Z.; Fibrich, P.; Sobolova, H.; Volny, O.; Christensen, H. K.; Drenck, N.; Iversen, H.; Simonsen, C.; Truelsen, T.; Wienecke, T.; Vibo, R.; Gross-Paju, K.; Toomsoo, T.; Antsov, K.; Caparros, F.; Cordonnier, C.; Dan, M.; Faucheux, J. M.; Mechtouff, L.; Eker, O.; Lesaine, E.; Ondze, B.; Pico, F.; Pop, R.; Rouanet, F.; Gubeladze, T.; Khinikadze, M.; Lobjanidze, N.; Tsiskaridze, A.; Nagel, S.; Ringleb, P. A.; Rosenkranz, M.; Schmidt, H.; Sedghi, A.; Siepmann, T.; Szabo, K.; Thomalla, G.; Palaiodimou, L.; Sagris, D.; Kargiotis, O.; Kaliaev, A.; Liebeskind, D.; Hassan, A.; Ranta, A.; Devlin, T.; Zaidat, O.; Castonguay, A.; Jovin, T.; Tsivgoulis, G.; Malik, A.; Ma, A.; Campbell, B.; Kleinig, T.; Wu, T.; Gongora, F.; Lavados, P.; Olavarria, V.; Lereis, V. P.; Corredor, A.; Barbosa, D. M.; Bayona, H.; Barrientos, J. D.; Patino, M.; Thijs, V.; Pirson, A.; Kristoffersen, E. S.; Patrik, M.; Fischer, U.; Bernava, G.; Renieri, L.; Strambo, D.; Ayo-Martin, O.; Montaner, J.; Karlinski, M.; Cruz-Culebras, A.; Luchowski, P.; Krastev, G.; Arenillas, J.; Gralla, J.; Mangiafico, S.; Blasco, J.; Fonseca, L.; Silva, M. L.; Kwan, J.; Banerjee, S.; Sangalli, D.; Frisullo, G.; Yavagal, D.; Uyttenboogaart, M.; Bandini, F.; Adami, A.; de Lecina, M. A.; Arribas, M. A. T.; Ferreira, P.; Cruz, V. T.; Nunes, A. P.; Marto, J. P.; Rodrigues, M.; Melo, T.; Saposnik, G.; Scott, C. A.; Shuaib, A.; Khosravani, H.; Fields, T.; Shoamanesh, A.; Catanese, L.; Mackey, A.; Hill, M.; Etherton, M.; Rost, N.; Lutsep, H.; Lee, V.; Mehta, B.; Pikula, A.; Simmons, M.; Macdougall, L.; Silver, B.; Khandelwal, P.; Morris, J.; Novakovic-White, R.; Ramakrishnan, P.; Shah, R.; Altschul, D.; Almufti, F.; Amaya, P.; Ordonez, C. E. R.; Lara, O.; Kadota, L. R.; Rivera, L. I. P.; Novarro, N.; Escobar, L. D.; Melgarejo, D.; Cardozo, A.; Blanco, A.; Zelaya, J. A.; Luraschi, A.; Gonzalez, V. H. N.; Almeida, J.; Conforto, A.; Almeida, M. S.; Silva, L. D.; Cuervo, D. L. M.; Zetola, V. F.; Martins, R. T.; Valler, L.; Giacomini, L. V.; Cardoso, F. B.; Sahathevan, R.; Hair, C.; Hankey, G.; Salazar, D.; Lima, F. O.; Mont'Alverne, F.; Moises, D.; Iman, B.; Magalhaes, P.; Longo, A.; Rebello, L.; Falup-Pecurariu, C.; Mazya, M.; Wisniewska, A.; Fryze, W.; Kazmierski, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Horoch, E.; Sienkiewicz-Jarosz, H.; Fudala, M.; Rogoziewicz, M.; Brola, W.; Sobolewski, P.; Kaczorowski, R.; Stepien, A.; Klivenyi, P.; Szapary, L.; van den Wijngaard, I.; Demchuk, A.; Abraham, M.; Alvarado-Ortiz, T.; Kaushal, R.; Ortega-Gutierrez, S.; Farooqui, M.; Bach, I.; Badruddin, A.; Barazangi, N.; Nguyen, C.; Brereton, C.; Choi, J. H.; Dharmadhikari, S.; Desai, K.; Doss, V.; Edgell, R.; Linares, G.; Frei, D.; Chaturvedi, S.; Gandhi, D.; Chaudhry, S.; Choe, H.; Grigoryan, M.; Gupta, R.; Helenius, J.; Voetsch, B.; Khwaja, A.; Khoury, N.; Kim, B. S.; Kleindorfer, D.; McDermott, M.; Koyfman, F.; Leung, L.; Linfante, I.; Male, S.; Masoud, H.; Min, J. Y.; Mittal, M.; Multani, S.; Nahab, F.; Nalleballe, K.; Rahangdale, R.; Rafael, J.; Rothstein, A.; Ruland, S.; Sharma, M.; Singh, A.; Starosciak, A.; Strasser, S.; Szeder, V.; Teleb, M.; Tsai, J.; Mohammaden, M.; Pineda-Franks, C.; Asyraf, W.; Nguyen, T. Q.; Tarkanyi, G.; Horev, A.; Haussen, D.; Balaguera, O.; Vasquez, A. R.; Nogueira, R..
Neurology ; 96(15):42, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576349
8.
Journal of Eating Disorders ; 9(SUPPL 1):1, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1576255
9.
Journal of Education ; - (84):31-47, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1534947

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the study on which this paper is based was to explore how self-identified female African university students understand the influence of their home environments on their experiences of online education. The study took place during the COVID-19 pandemic when universities in South Africa and elsewhere introduced online teaching and learning. Using a qualitative approach to a single case study design within a critical feminist paradigm, we carried out an inductive thematic analysis of the data from seven in-depth, open-ended questionnaires and metaphors. We found that home environments play an important role in the education of female African students, particularly in a context characterised by gender inequalities exacerbated by inequities in material resources. However, a sense of agency, displayed by some participants, indicated their determination to rise above the many forms of marginalisation and discrimination they experienced.

12.
Student Success ; 12(2):1-11, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1471138

ABSTRACT

The shift to Emergency Remote Teaching and Learning (ERTL) in response to the COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated online learning at home for South African (and other) students. Using a critical paradigm, qualitative approach and case study design, this study, underpinned by critical theory, used interviews, voice notes and text messages to generate data to explore how South African university students’ home contexts shape their experiences of ERTL. Using thematic analysis, the findings indicated that student learning at home was negatively impacted by poor internet connectivity, home responsibilities, cramped living conditions, lack of safety, and financial and psycho-social stresses. The findings exposed the lived realities of students’ home contexts, made more difficult through the pandemic. This study adds to the literature on student adaptation to learning in the pandemic within home contexts characterised by resource poverty and challenging psycho-social conditions. © The Author/s 2021.

13.
Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery ; 165(1 SUPPL):P121, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1467818

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In critically ill patients with SARS-CoV-2, risk factors for laryngeal complications after endotracheal intubation (ie, diabetes, obesity, prolonged intubation, hypotension, and large endotracheal tube [ETT] size) are common. Given the global impact of the virus, more information is needed regarding the long-term laryngeal effects on both breathing and voice. Method: A retrospective review of patients receiving laryngologic care at a tertiary academic center was compiled, and patient characteristics were abstracted. Postmortem analysis of subglottic tissue in 2 patients with SARS-CoV-2 was performed using in situ hybridization of SARS-CoV-2 RNA and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD4 and CD8. Results: Collectively, patients (n = 8) were 55.0 (SD ±14.3) years old with a body mass index of 33.7 (SD ±4.5). Most had type 2 diabetes mellitus (62.5%) and hypertension (50%). The average intubation duration was 15.1 days (SD ±5). Most patients were intubated with an 8.0 ETT. The level of laryngotracheal injury occurred within the posterior glottis (n = 6 [75%]) and subglottis (n = 2 [25%]). Both subglottic specimens tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection were positive for the virus within the mucosal epithelium. IHC demonstrated CD4+ and CD8+ cells indicating an abundant adaptive immune response. At our institution, 1.5% of SARS-CoV-2 patients required intubation. By extrapolating from these data, we estimate roughly 300,000 patients required intubation nationally in 2020 for SARS-CoV-2 infection with more than 225,000 survivors at risk for laryngotracheal complications. Conclusion: Laryngotracheal complications occur frequently after intubation for SARS-CoV-2. Earlier tracheostomy, use of smaller ETTs, and early injury identification through routine screening may limit the impact of functional laryngeal disability.

14.
Cell ; 184(18): 4713-4733.e22, 2021 09 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343153

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection can cause severe respiratory COVID-19. However, many individuals present with isolated upper respiratory symptoms, suggesting potential to constrain viral pathology to the nasopharynx. Which cells SARS-CoV-2 primarily targets and how infection influences the respiratory epithelium remains incompletely understood. We performed scRNA-seq on nasopharyngeal swabs from 58 healthy and COVID-19 participants. During COVID-19, we observe expansion of secretory, loss of ciliated, and epithelial cell repopulation via deuterosomal cell expansion. In mild and moderate COVID-19, epithelial cells express anti-viral/interferon-responsive genes, while cells in severe COVID-19 have muted anti-viral responses despite equivalent viral loads. SARS-CoV-2 RNA+ host-target cells are highly heterogenous, including developing ciliated, interferon-responsive ciliated, AZGP1high goblet, and KRT13+ "hillock"-like cells, and we identify genes associated with susceptibility, resistance, or infection response. Our study defines protective and detrimental responses to SARS-CoV-2, the direct viral targets of infection, and suggests that failed nasal epithelial anti-viral immunity may underlie and precede severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Immunity , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Bystander Effect , COVID-19/genetics , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/pathology , Nasopharynx/virology , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , Respiratory Mucosa/pathology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Load
15.
Am J Gastroenterol ; 116(8): 1638-1645, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248431

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use was recently reported to be associated with increased severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and worse clinical outcomes. The underlying mechanism(s) for this association are unclear. METHODS: We performed a prospective study of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients and COVID-negative controls to understand how PPI use may affect angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression and stool SARS-CoV-2 RNA. Analysis of a retrospective cohort of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 from March 15, 2020 to August 15, 2020 in 6 hospitals was performed to evaluate the association of PPI use and mortality. Covariates with clinical relevance to COVID-19 outcomes were included to determine predictors of in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: Control PPI users had higher salivary ACE2 mRNA levels than nonusers, 2.39 ± 1.15 vs 1.22 ± 0.92 (P = 0.02), respectively. Salivary ACE2 levels and stool SARS-CoV-2 RNA detection rates were comparable between users and nonusers of PPI. In 694 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 (age = 58 years, 46% men, and 65% black), mortality rate in PPI users and nonusers was 30% (68/227) vs 12.1% (53/439), respectively. Predictors of mortality by logistic regression were PPI use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.72, P < 0.001), age (aOR = 1.66 per decade, P < 0.001), race (aOR = 3.03, P = 0.002), cancer (aOR = 2.22, P = 0.008), and diabetes (aOR = 1.95, P = 0.003). The PPI-associated mortality risk was higher in black patients (aOR = 4.16, 95% confidence interval: 2.28-7.59) than others (aOR = 1.62, 95% confidence interval: 0.82-3.19, P = 0.04 for interaction). DISCUSSION: COVID-negative PPI users had higher salivary ACE2 expression. PPI use was associated with increased mortality risk in patients with COVID-19, particularly African Americans.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Proton Pump Inhibitors/adverse effects , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL