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2.
J Clin Med ; 11(15)2022 Jul 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1969325

ABSTRACT

Cutaneous neurosensory symptoms have become increasingly reported findings in COVID-19; however, these virus-related manifestations are largely overlooked, and their pathology is poorly understood. Moreover, alterations of skin sensibility currently recognize no clear histopathology substrate. The purpose of this study was to provide pathology evidence of neurosensory skin system involvement in COVID-19 patients complaining of subjective neurological symptoms affecting the skin. Out of 142 patients, six long COVID-19 cases complaining of cutaneous subjective neurological symptoms assessed on an NTSS-6 questionnaire underwent histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses of skin areas affected by paroxysmal diffuse burning and itching sensations. Two patients also performed electroneurography examination. The histology investigation showed hypertrophic glomus vascular bodies with hypertrophic S100+ perineural sheath cells and adjacent hypertrophy of the nerve branches associated with increased basophil polysaccharide matrix. Electroneurography revealed disturbances of A-delta and C dermal neuronal fibers. The main limitation of this study consisted of a limited number of skin biopsy samples, requiring further investigation. Histopathology findings are consistent with hypertrophy of nerve endings, suggesting a condition such as "dermal hyperneury", a recently reported small nerve hypertrophy condition affecting sensory C fibers. Such a neuropathic basis could explain dysesthesia experienced by the patients, as previously described in postherpetic neuralgia.

3.
J Clin Med ; 11(13)2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1917550

ABSTRACT

After coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused a global pandemic, vaccines were rapidly developed to control the spread of the virus. Although they were effective in most of the cases at protecting people from becoming seriously ill and being hospitalized, they showed side effects, too. Among other adverse vaccine reactions, cutaneous eruptions following SARS-CoV-2 have been described in the literature, but they are not well-characterized yet. We described the morphology and timing of the spectrum of cutaneous reactions following most of the COVID-19 vaccines available in Italy, which were observed in outpatients referred to our non-invasive diagnostic clinic. Most of these reactions appeared after the second or third COVID-19 vaccine dose (most of them after mRNA COVID-19 vaccines). Our data support that cutaneous reactions to COVID-19 vaccination are generally self-limited; in addition, history of allergic reaction to a specific food, medicine or vaccine should not discourage vaccination in the general population, although patients with immune dysregulation should be accurately selected and monitored. Further research is necessary to better assess the true prevalence and preventive measures of skin reactions to COVID-19 vaccination.

4.
Transl Biophotonics ; 4(3): e202200009, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1913899

ABSTRACT

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most frequently occurring type of all cancers, and represents 80% of all skin cancer. The estimated lifetime risk for BCC in the white population is between 33% and 39% for men and 23% and 28% for women. Its incidence doubles every 25 years and is increasing in the young population. Death is uncommon and seems to decrease in the last years, probably due to early and better diagnosis. BCC arises from abnormal and uncontrolled growth of basal cells. It is a slow-growing tumor, therefore usually curable at an early stage with surgery or alternative treatment, such as cryotherapy, laser, photodynamic therapy, retinoids and topical agent like 5-Fluorouracil cream, imiquimod cream, and so forth. Topical treatment of superficial basocellular carcinoma is a viable option, when surgery is not an advisable treatment, especially in the case of giant basocellular carcinoma. In this subtype, imiquimod 5% cream can be a safe and effective treatment, but there are few reports in available literature. We present our case series of eight patients with superficial giant basocellular carcinoma successfully treated with imiquimod 5% cream, which showed clinical improvement after 8 weeks of treatment.

6.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14390, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841234

ABSTRACT

Dermatology is a field of medicine where urgent cases occur commonly. However, access to specialized emergency dermatology services is very limited. Following the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic, the cessation of all elective dermatology visits was widely urged. Accordingly, in Italy, a country severely affected by the pandemic, various measures were applied and the care at university clinics was limited to urgent cases. Here we retrospectively analyzed data of patients who presented at an Italian academic outpatient clinic reserved only for emergency cases. In total, 252 patients (109 males and 143 females) with a mean age of 55.25 ± 20.99 years were cared for at our clinic during a three-month period. We classified 10 patients (4%) as real emergency cases. Pityriasis rosea was diagnosed in three patients. Many patients sought care for skin cancer screening. In 131 patients (52%) dermoscopic skin examinations were performed. In 39 patients (15%), actinic keratosis or nonmelanoma skin cancer was detected, while melanoma was diagnosed in three patients, two of which were proven later as in situ melanoma. About 111 patients (44%) visited our clinic for other, nonurgent skin diseases. Our results imply that many patients felt that their skin problems required immediate attention, even if this could not be justified. Melanoma care may be considered an emergency care for its highly malignant potential and the possibility of rapid spreading. Adequately taken photos with a dermoscope may be readily read without the presence of specialist in the emergency room to prevent unnecessary delay in diagnosing oncologic skin diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatology , Emergency Service, Hospital , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Skin Diseases/diagnosis , Skin Diseases/therapy , Academic Medical Centers , Adult , Aged , Dermoscopy , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Remote Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Time Factors
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