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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 142, 2022 Feb 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Thrombotic microangiopathy has been invoked as one of the most important mechanisms of damage in COVID-19 patients. Protease ADAMTS13 is a marker of microangiopathy responsible for controlling von Willebrand multimers size. Von Willebrand factor/ADAMTS13 ratio has been found impaired in COVID-19 patients outside pregnancy. METHODS: We prospectively investigated 90 pregnant women admitted to two tertiary academic hospitals in Italy with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Demographic, clinical information and routine laboratory data were collected at the hospital admission and until discharge. We investigated whether vonWillebrand /ADAMTS13 axis imbalance is a predictor of adverse outcomes. Logistic regression analysis, which controlled for potential confounders, was performed to evaluate the association between laboratory parameters and clinical outcomes. RESULTS: Most women (55.6%) were parae, with median gestational age at admission of 39 weeks. At hospital admission, 63.3% were asymptomatic for COVID-19 and 24.4% showed more than one sign or symptom of infection. Nulliparae with group O showed Willebrand / ADA MTS-13 ratios significantly lower than non-O, whereas in multiparae this difference was not observed. Logistic regression showed that ratio von Willebrand to ADAMTS13 was significantly and independently associated with preterm delivery (OR 1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.5). CONCLUSION: This study shows an imbalance of vonWillebrand /ADAMTS13 axis in pregnant women with COVID-19, leading to a significantly higher and independent risk of preterm delivery. Monitoring these biomarkers might support decision making process to manage and follow-up pregnancies in this setting.


Subject(s)
ADAMTS13 Protein/blood , COVID-19/blood , Pregnancy Complications/blood , Premature Birth/blood , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Academic Medical Centers , Adolescent , Adult , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/etiology , Young Adult
2.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(2)2022 Jan 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648796

ABSTRACT

The effects of coronavirus disease 2019 caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 on pregnant women and neonates are mainly unknown, since limited data are available in the literature. We conducted a monocentric and cross-sectional study enrolling 122 un-vaccinated pregnant women with COVID-19 infection tested by RT-PCR nasopharyngeal swab. Only 4.1% of the patients had severe COVID-19 symptoms together with major respiratory symptoms and intensive care unit admission, whereas 35.25% of women had comorbidities and two-thirds of them were overweight or obese. COVID-19 was detected mainly in the third trimester (98.36%) and multiparous women (59.02%). The mode of delivery was influenced by mild-severe COVID-19 symptoms, with a higher number of urgent or emergent cesarean sections than spontaneous or operative vaginal births. Preterm births were associated with high BMI, mode of delivery (higher among cesarean sections), nulliparity, and severe COVID-19 symptoms. In cases of severe COVID-19 symptoms, there was a higher rate of respiratory distress syndrome among newborns. In the end, only the presence of a severe COVID-19 infection worsened the obstetrical and neonatal outcomes, with higher rates of urgent or emergent cesarean section, preterm births, and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome.

3.
Neonatology ; 118(6): 665-671, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1463073

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is the disease caused by the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, responsible of the pandemic declared in March 2020 and still ongoing. COVID-19 affects all ages but presents less complications and fatalities in children. Neonatal infections have rarely been reported worldwide, and vertical transmission is uncertain. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of all infants born to SARS-CoV-2-positive mothers admitted to 2 hospitals in South (Bari) and North (Varese) of Italy from April to December 2020. A molecular nasopharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 using a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was made at birth for all enrolled newborns to evaluate vertical transmission of infection. We also evaluated postnatal transmission with a second nasopharyngeal swab made at 1 month of life and described maternal and neonatal clinical findings and short-term outcomes. RESULTS: 176/179 (97%) newborns were SARS-CoV-2 negative at birth and 151/156 (97%) infants were still negative at 1 month of life. All newborns were asymptomatic. Seventy percent of newborns were breastfed during hospitalization. At 1 month of life, 76% of infants were breastfed. CONCLUSION: According to our results, vertical and perinatal infection is very rare. Breastfeeding does not increase the risk of COVID-19 and should be encouraged.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Child , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Mothers , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 141: 111922, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309164

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 19 (Covid-19) pandemic is devastating the public health: it is urgent to find a viable therapy to reduce the multiorgan damage of the disease. A validated therapeutic protocol is still missing. The most severe forms of the disease are related to an exaggerated inflammatory response. The pivotal role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the amplification of inflammation makes the antioxidants a potential therapy, but clinical trials are needed. The lecitinized superoxide dismutase (PC-SOD) could represent a possibility because of bioaviability, safety, and its modulatory effect on the innate immune response in reducing the harmful consequences of oxidative stress. In this review we summarize the evidence on lecitinized superoxide dismutase in animal and human studies, to highlight the rationale for using the PC-SOD to treat COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Phosphatidylcholines/therapeutic use , Superoxide Dismutase/therapeutic use , Animals , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Antioxidants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/metabolism , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure/diagnosis , Multiple Organ Failure/drug therapy , Multiple Organ Failure/metabolism , Oxidative Stress/physiology , Pandemics , Phosphatidylcholines/pharmacology , Reactive Oxygen Species/antagonists & inhibitors , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Superoxide Dismutase/pharmacology
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