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1.
JAMA ; 327(9): 826-835, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1750256

ABSTRACT

Importance: It is estimated that only 27% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and large vessel occlusion who undergo successful reperfusion after mechanical thrombectomy are disability free at 90 days. An incomplete microcirculatory reperfusion might contribute to these suboptimal clinical benefits. Objective: To investigate whether treatment with adjunct intra-arterial alteplase after thrombectomy improves outcomes following reperfusion. Design, Setting, and Participants: Phase 2b randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial performed from December 2018 through May 2021 in 7 stroke centers in Catalonia, Spain. The study included 121 patients with large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke treated with thrombectomy within 24 hours after stroke onset and with an expanded Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia angiographic score of 2b50 to 3. Interventions: Participants were randomized to receive intra-arterial alteplase (0.225 mg/kg; maximum dose, 22.5 mg) infused over 15 to 30 minutes (n = 61) or placebo (n = 52). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was the difference in proportion of patients achieving a score of 0 or 1 on the 90-day modified Rankin Scale (range, 0 [no symptoms] to 6 [death]) in all patients treated as randomized. Safety outcomes included rate of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage and death. Results: The study was terminated early for inability to maintain placebo availability and enrollment rate because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Of 1825 patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with thrombectomy at the 7 study sites, 748 (41%) patients fulfilled the angiographic criteria, 121 (7%) patients were randomized (mean age, 70.6 [SD, 13.7] years; 57 women [47%]), and 113 (6%) were treated as randomized. The proportion of participants with a modified Rankin Scale score of 0 or 1 at 90 days was 59.0% (36/61) with alteplase and 40.4% (21/52) with placebo (adjusted risk difference, 18.4%; 95% CI, 0.3%-36.4%; P = .047). The proportion of patients with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage within 24 hours was 0% with alteplase and 3.8% with placebo (risk difference, -3.8%; 95% CI, -13.2% to 2.5%). Ninety-day mortality was 8% with alteplase and 15% with placebo (risk difference, -7.2%; 95% CI, -19.2% to 4.8%). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with large vessel occlusion acute ischemic stroke and successful reperfusion following thrombectomy, the use of adjunct intra-arterial alteplase compared with placebo resulted in a greater likelihood of excellent neurological outcome at 90 days. However, because of study limitations, these findings should be interpreted as preliminary and require replication. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03876119; EudraCT Number: 2018-002195-40.


Subject(s)
Cerebral Arteries , Fibrinolytic Agents/administration & dosage , Ischemic Stroke/drug therapy , Ischemic Stroke/surgery , Thrombectomy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Arterial Occlusive Diseases/complications , Combined Modality Therapy , Double-Blind Method , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Treatment Outcome
3.
BMJ Open ; 11(11): e052140, 2021 11 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537954

ABSTRACT

DESIGN AND OBJECTIVES: A cross-sectional study to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on the psychosocial sphere in both the general population and healthcare workers (HCWs). METHODS: The study was conducted in Catalonia (Spain) during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic when strict lockdown was in force. The study population included all people aged over 16 years who consented to participate in the study and completed the survey, in this case a 74-question questionnaire shared via social media using snowball sampling. A total of 56 656 completed survey questionnaires were obtained between 3 and 19 April 2020.The primary and secondary outcome measures included descriptive statistics for the non-psychological questions and the psychological impact of the pandemic, such as depression, anxiety, stress and post-traumatic stress disorder question scores. RESULTS: A n early and markedly negative impact on family finances, fear of working with COVID-19 patients and ethical issues related to COVID-19 care among HCWs was observed. A total of seven target groups at higher risk of impaired mental health and which may therefore benefit from an intervention were identified, namely women, subjects aged less than 42 years, people with a care burden, socioeconomically deprived groups, people with unskilled or unqualified jobs, patients with COVID-19 and HCWs working with patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Active implementation of specific strategies to increase resilience and to prepare an adequate organisational response should be encouraged for the seven groups identified as high risk and susceptible to benefit from an intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT04378452.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Vulnerable Populations
4.
Stroke ; 52(12): 3908-3917, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526560

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We evaluated whether stroke severity, functional outcome, and mortality are different in patients with ischemic stroke with or without coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: A prospective, observational, multicentre cohort study in Catalonia, Spain. Recruitment was consecutive from mid-March to mid-May 2020. Patients had an acute ischemic stroke within 48 hours and a previous modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0 to 3. We collected demographic data, vascular risk factors, prior mRS score, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, rate of reperfusion therapies, logistics, and metrics. Primary end point was functional outcome at 3 months. Favourable outcome was defined depending on the previous mRS score. Secondary outcome was mortality at 3 months. We performed mRS shift and multivariable analyses. RESULTS: We evaluated 701 patients (mean age 72.3±13.3 years, 60.5% men) and 91 (13%) had COVID-19 infection. Median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was higher in patients with COVID-19 compared with patients without COVID-19 (8 [3-18] versus 6 [2-14], P=0.049). Proportion of patients with a favourable functional outcome was 33.7% in the COVID-19 and 47% in the non-COVID-19 group. However, after a multivariable logistic regression analysis, COVID-19 infection did not increase the probability of unfavourable functional outcome. Mortality rate was 39.3% among patients with COVID-19 and 16.1% in the non-COVID-19 group. In the multivariable logistic regression analysis, COVID-19 infection was a risk factor for mortality (hazard ratio, 3.14 [95% CI, 2.10-4.71]; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ischemic stroke and COVID-19 infection have more severe strokes and a higher mortality than patients with stroke without COVID-19 infection. However, functional outcome is comparable in both groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Functional Status , Ischemic Stroke/physiopathology , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/mortality , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Multivariate Analysis , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy
5.
Front Public Health ; 9: 633123, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325582

ABSTRACT

The current worldwide pandemic produced by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has changed the paradigm of mathematical epidemiology due to the high number of unknowns of this new disease. Thus, the empirical approach has emerged as a robust tool to analyze the actual situation carried by the countries and also allows us to predict the incoming scenarios. In this paper, we propose three empirical indexes to estimate the state of the pandemic. These indexes quantify both the propagation and the number of estimated cases, allowing us to accurately determine the real risk of a country. We have calculated these indexes' evolution for several European countries. Risk diagrams are introduced as a tool to visualize the evolution of a country and evaluate its current risk as a function of the number of contagious individuals and the empiric reproduction number. Risk diagrams at the regional level are useful to observe heterogeneity on COVID-19 penetration and spreading in some countries, which is essential during deconfinement processes. During the pandemic, there have been significant differences seen in countries reporting case criterion and detection capacity. Therefore, we have introduced estimations about the real number of infectious cases that allows us to have a broader view and to better estimate the risk. These diagrams and indexes have been successfully used for the monitoring of European countries and regions during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Europe , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Cerebrovasc Dis ; 50(5): 551-559, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238619

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in significant healthcare reorganizations, potentially striking standard medical care. We investigated the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on acute stroke care quality and clinical outcomes to detect healthcare system's bottlenecks from a territorial point of view. METHODS: Crossed-data analysis between a prospective nation-based mandatory registry of acute stroke, Emergency Medical System (EMS) records, and daily incidence of COVID-19 in Catalonia (Spain). We included all stroke code activations during the pandemic (March 15-May 2, 2020) and an immediate prepandemic period (January 26-March 14, 2020). Primary outcomes were stroke code activations and reperfusion therapies in both periods. Secondary outcomes included clinical characteristics, workflow metrics, differences across types of stroke centers, correlation analysis between weekly EMS alerts, COVID-19 cases, and workflow metrics, and impact on mortality and clinical outcome at 90 days. RESULTS: Stroke code activations decreased by 22% and reperfusion therapies dropped by 29% during the pandemic period, with no differences in age, stroke severity, or large vessel occlusion. Calls to EMS were handled 42 min later, and time from onset to hospital arrival increased by 53 min, with significant correlations between weekly COVID-19 cases and more EMS calls (rho = 0.81), less stroke code activations (rho = -0.37), and longer prehospital delays (rho = 0.25). Telestroke centers were afflicted with higher reductions in stroke code activations, reperfusion treatments, referrals to endovascular centers, and increased delays to thrombolytics. The independent odds of death increased (OR 1.6 [1.05-2.4], p 0.03) and good functional outcome decreased (mRS ≤2 at 90 days: OR 0.6 [0.4-0.9], p 0.015) during the pandemic period. CONCLUSION: During the COVID-19 pandemic, Catalonia's stroke system's weakest points were the delay to EMS alert and a decline of stroke code activations, reperfusion treatments, and interhospital transfers, mostly at local centers. Patients suffering an acute stroke during the pandemic period had higher odds of poor functional outcome and death. The complete stroke care system's analysis is crucial to allocate resources appropriately.


Subject(s)
Emergency Medical Services , Fibrinolytic Agents/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Stroke/virology , Humans , Prospective Studies , Spain/epidemiology , Stroke/diagnosis , Thrombolytic Therapy/methods , Time-to-Treatment
7.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0243701, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060187

ABSTRACT

Policymakers need clear, fast assessment of the real spread of the COVID-19 epidemic in each of their respective countries. Standard measures of the situation provided by the governments include reported positive cases and total deaths. While total deaths indicate immediately that countries like Italy and Spain had the worst situation as of mid-April, 2020, reported cases alone do not provide a complete picture of the situation. Different countries diagnose differently and present very distinctive reported case fatality ratios. Similar levels of reported incidence and mortality might hide a very different underlying pictures. Here we present a straightforward and robust estimation of the diagnostic rate in each European country. From that estimation we obtain a uniform, unbiased incidence of the epidemic. The method to obtain the diagnostic rate is transparent and empirical. The key assumption of the method is that the infection fatality ratio of COVID-19 in Europe is not strongly country-dependent. We show that this number is not expected to be biased due to demography nor to the way total deaths are reported. The estimation protocol is dynamic, and it has been yielding converging numbers for diagnostic rates in all European countries as from mid-April, 2020. Using this diagnostic rate, policy makers can obtain Effective Potential Growth updated every day, providing an unbiased assessment of the countries at greater risk of experiencing an uncontrolled situation. The method developed has been and will be used to track possible improvements in the diagnostic rate in European countries as the epidemic evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Basic Reproduction Number , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Europe/epidemiology , European Union , Health Policy , Humans , Incidence
8.
PLoS One ; 16(1): e0243701, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013207

ABSTRACT

Policymakers need clear, fast assessment of the real spread of the COVID-19 epidemic in each of their respective countries. Standard measures of the situation provided by the governments include reported positive cases and total deaths. While total deaths indicate immediately that countries like Italy and Spain had the worst situation as of mid-April, 2020, reported cases alone do not provide a complete picture of the situation. Different countries diagnose differently and present very distinctive reported case fatality ratios. Similar levels of reported incidence and mortality might hide a very different underlying pictures. Here we present a straightforward and robust estimation of the diagnostic rate in each European country. From that estimation we obtain a uniform, unbiased incidence of the epidemic. The method to obtain the diagnostic rate is transparent and empirical. The key assumption of the method is that the infection fatality ratio of COVID-19 in Europe is not strongly country-dependent. We show that this number is not expected to be biased due to demography nor to the way total deaths are reported. The estimation protocol is dynamic, and it has been yielding converging numbers for diagnostic rates in all European countries as from mid-April, 2020. Using this diagnostic rate, policy makers can obtain Effective Potential Growth updated every day, providing an unbiased assessment of the countries at greater risk of experiencing an uncontrolled situation. The method developed has been and will be used to track possible improvements in the diagnostic rate in European countries as the epidemic evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Basic Reproduction Number , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Europe/epidemiology , European Union , Health Policy , Humans , Incidence
9.
PLoS Comput Biol ; 16(12): e1008431, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965902

ABSTRACT

The appearance and fast spreading of Covid-19 took the international community by surprise. Collaboration between researchers, public health workers, and politicians has been established to deal with the epidemic. One important contribution from researchers in epidemiology is the analysis of trends so that both the current state and short-term future trends can be carefully evaluated. Gompertz model has been shown to correctly describe the dynamics of cumulative confirmed cases, since it is characterized by a decrease in growth rate showing the effect of control measures. Thus, it provides a way to systematically quantify the Covid-19 spreading velocity and it allows short-term predictions and longer-term estimations. This model has been employed to fit the cumulative cases of Covid-19 from several European countries. Results show that there are systematic differences in spreading velocity among countries. The model predictions provide a reliable picture of the short-term evolution in countries that are in the initial stages of the Covid-19 outbreak, and may permit researchers to uncover some characteristics of the long-term evolution. These predictions can also be generalized to calculate short-term hospital and intensive care units (ICU) requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Models, Statistical , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Computational Biology , Europe , Humans , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Neuroimaging ; 31(1): 62-66, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: SARS-CoV-2 causes multiorgan disease due to altered coagulability and microangiopathy. Patients may have an increased risk of cerebrovascular accidents (CVA). Our objective was to analyze clinical and neuroimaging characteristics of patients with ischemic CVA during the pandemic peak in our region, in order to identify atypical presentations. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of patients admitted under code-stroke protocol to our center with a final diagnosis of ischemic brain infarction. We analyzed the main imaging and demographic characteristics and reviewed neuroimaging for atypical presentations. RESULTS: One-hundred patients with confirmed ischemic CVA were included. Nineteen had positive polymerase chain reaction testing for SARS-CoV-2 on admission. These patients had a lower prevalence of proximal arterial occlusion on imaging, higher in-hospital mortality, and worse baseline disability. No differences were identified in affected vascular territory, volume of infarction, initial CT stroke score, prevalence of hemorrhagic transformation, gender, age, cardiovascular risk factors, time to admission, symptom severity on entry, or decision to treat with thrombolysis or mechanical thrombectomy. Prevalence of COVID-19 in our code-stroke sample was higher than that for our province during this time period. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 group had more in-hospital mortality, less proximal arterial occlusion on CT or MR angiography, and lower baseline modified Rankin Scale score. We suggest a possibly higher proportion of microangiopathic involvement or undetected distal large-vessel occlusion in the COVID-19 stroke group. Excess mortality was explained by severe respiratory failure. Otherwise, stroke patients with COVID-19 did not differ demographically or clinically from those without the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Ischemic Stroke/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Neuroimaging , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
11.
Int J Stroke ; 16(4): 437-447, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-806135

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been associated with a significant risk of thrombotic events in critically ill patients. AIM: To summarize the findings of a multinational observational cohort of patients with SARS-CoV-2 and cerebrovascular disease. METHODS: Retrospective observational cohort of consecutive adults evaluated in the emergency department and/or admitted with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across 31 hospitals in four countries (1 February 2020-16 June 2020). The primary outcome was the incidence rate of cerebrovascular events, inclusive of acute ischemic stroke, intracranial hemorrhages (ICH), and cortical vein and/or sinus thrombosis (CVST). RESULTS: Of the 14,483 patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2, 172 were diagnosed with an acute cerebrovascular event (1.13% of cohort; 1130/100,000 patients, 95%CI 970-1320/100,000), 68/171 (40.5%) were female and 96/172 (55.8%) were between the ages 60 and 79 years. Of these, 156 had acute ischemic stroke (1.08%; 1080/100,000 95%CI 920-1260/100,000), 28 ICH (0.19%; 190/100,000 95%CI 130-280/100,000), and 3 with CVST (0.02%; 20/100,000, 95%CI 4-60/100,000). The in-hospital mortality rate for SARS-CoV-2-associated stroke was 38.1% and for ICH 58.3%. After adjusting for clustering by site and age, baseline stroke severity, and all predictors of in-hospital mortality found in univariate regression (p < 0.1: male sex, tobacco use, arrival by emergency medical services, lower platelet and lymphocyte counts, and intracranial occlusion), cryptogenic stroke mechanism (aOR 5.01, 95%CI 1.63-15.44, p < 0.01), older age (aOR 1.78, 95%CI 1.07-2.94, p = 0.03), and lower lymphocyte count on admission (aOR 0.58, 95%CI 0.34-0.98, p = 0.04) were the only independent predictors of mortality among patients with stroke and COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is associated with a small but significant risk of clinically relevant cerebrovascular events, particularly ischemic stroke. The mortality rate is high for COVID-19-associated cerebrovascular complications; therefore, aggressive monitoring and early intervention should be pursued to mitigate poor outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrovascular Disorders/etiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intracranial Hemorrhages/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Lymphocyte Count , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Thrombosis/etiology , Tobacco Use , Young Adult
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