Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Kardiol Pol ; 79(11): 1197-1205, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1543158

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a viral respiratory illness caused by the SARS-CoV-2 infection. In addition to lung disease, clinical complications of COVID-19 include myocardial damage and ischemia-related vascular disease. Severe manifestations and poor prognosis in these patients are associated with a hypercoagulable state predisposing to thrombotic-related complications and eventually death. However, these clinical features can also occur in other forms of pneumonia, such as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which, is also complicated by vascular diseases and characterized by platelet activation. Platelets play a pivotal role in these settings as bacteria and viruses may induce activation via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in CAP patients and different and multiple pathways, including ACE2-AngII axis and/or TLRs, in COVID-19 patients. Despite evidence confirming the implication of platelet activation in both settings, their contribution to the thrombotic process is still under investigation. Thus, in this review, we (1) compare the thrombotic features of SARS-CoV-2 infection and CAP, (2) analyze the putative mechanisms accounting for venous and arterial thrombosis in SARS-CoV-2 infection, and (3) discuss the potential anticoagulant armamentarium to counteract thrombosis.

2.
Panminerva Med ; 63(3): 324-331, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504553

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: New messenger RNA (mRNA) and adenovirus-based vaccines (AdV) against Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have entered large scale clinical trials. Since healthcare professionals (HCPs) and armed forces personnel (AFP) represent a high-risk category, they act as a suitable target population to investigate vaccine-related side effects, including headache, which has emerged as a common complaint. METHODS: We investigated the side-effects of COVID-19 vaccines among HCPs and AFP through a 38 closed-question international survey. The electronic link was distributed via e-mail or via Whatsapp to more than 500 contacts. Responses to the survey questions were analyzed with bivariate tests. RESULTS: A total of 375 complete surveys have been analyzed. More than 88% received an mRNA vaccine and 11% received AdV first dose. A second dose of mRNA vaccine was administered in 76% of individuals. No severe adverse effects were reported, whereas moderate reactions and those lasting more than 1 day were more common with AdV (P=0.002 and P=0.024 respectively). Headache was commonly reported regardless of the vaccine type, but less frequently, with shorter duration and lower severity that usually experienced by participants, without significant difference irrespective of vaccine type. CONCLUSIONS: Both mRNA and AdV COVID-19 vaccines were safe and well tolerated in a real-life subset of HCPs and AFP subjects.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Headache/chemically induced , Vaccination/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Headache/diagnosis , Headache/epidemiology , Health Care Surveys , Health Personnel , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
3.
Panminerva Med ; 2021 Feb 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076992

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic with the stay-at-home orders and lockdown has dramatically forced athletes to stop team training and competitions, causing deep changes in habits and lifestyle. Aim of this study was to evaluate in a retrospective single center study the cardiovascular (CV) health and fitness of elite football player after COVID-19 lockdown in Italy and to compare such findings with the 2019 off-season period, in order to identify potential differences in the CV features and outcomes. METHODS: All 29 professional Football players of the first male team were enrolled before resuming training and competition after COVID-19 lockdown and underwent several exams including physical examination, resting and stress electrocardiography (ECG), echocardiography, spirometry and blood tests. RESULTS: Median age was 27 years (23; 31), with no athlete being COVID-19 positive at the time of the evaluation. In comparison with the usual off-season 2-month detraining, significant differences were found for left ventricular (LV) mass (189g [172; 212] vs. 181g [167; 206], p=0.024) and LV mass index for body surface area (94g/m2 [85; 104] vs 88g/m2 [79.5; 101.5], p=0.017), while LV mass/fat free mass remained unchanged (2.8 g/Kg [2.6; 2.9] vs 2.9 g/Kg [2.6; 3.2], p=0.222). Respiratory function and metabolic profile were improved, while no significant changes were found in ECG findings, at rest and during exercise. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged abstinence from training and competitions induced by lockdown elicited significant changes in comparison with off-season in parameters ascribable to detraining, as the changes in LV mass, in respiratory function and in metabolic profile.

4.
Int J Cardiol ; 329: 251-259, 2021 04 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002620

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused an unprecedented change in the apparent epidemiology of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, the interplay between this disease, changes in pollution, climate, and aversion to activation of emergency medical services represents a challenging conundrum. We aimed at appraising the impact of COVID-19, weather, and environment features on the occurrence of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) in a large Italian region and metropolitan area. METHODS AND RESULTS: Italy was hit early on by COVID-19, such that state of emergency was declared on January 31, 2020, and national lockdown implemented on March 9, 2020, mainly because the accrual of cases in Northern Italy. In order to appraise the independent contribution on changes in STEMI and NSTEMI daily rates of COVID-19, climate and pollution, we collected data on these clinical events from tertiary care cardiovascular centers in the Lazio region and Rome metropolitan area. Multilevel Poisson modeling was used to appraise unadjusted and adjusted effect estimates for the daily incidence of STEMI and NSTEMI cases. The sample included 1448 STEMI and 2040 NSTEMI, with a total of 2882 PCI spanning 6 months. Significant reductions in STEMI and NSTEMI were evident already in early February 2020 (all p<0.05), concomitantly with COVID-19 spread and institution of national countermeasures. Changes in STEMI and NSTEMI were inversely associated with daily COVID-19 tests, cases, and/or death (p<0.05). In addition, STEMI and NSTEMI incidences were associated with daily NO2, PM10, and O3 concentrations, as well as temperature (p<0.05). Multi-stage and multiply adjusted models highlighted that reductions in STEMI were significantly associated with COVID-19 data (p<0.001), whereas changes in NSTEMI were significantly associated with both NO2 and COVID-19 data (both p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Reductions in STEMI and NSTEMI in the COVID-19 pandemic may depend on different concomitant epidemiologic and pathophysiologic mechanisms. In particular, recent changes in STEMI may depend on COVID-19 scare, leading to excess all-cause mortality, or effective reduced incidence, whereas reductions in NSTEMI may also be due to beneficial reductions in NO2 emissions in the lockdown phase.


Subject(s)
Acute Coronary Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Environmental Pollution/adverse effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Weather , Aged , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
5.
Eur J Clin Invest ; 50(10): e13378, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To systematically review clinical and biochemical characteristics associated with the severity of the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-related disease (COVID-19). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Systematic review of observational studies from PubMed, ISI Web of Science, SCOPUS and Cochrane databases including people affected by COVID-19 and reporting data according to the severity of the disease. Data were combined with odds ratio (OR) and metanalysed. Severe COVID-19 was defined by acute respiratory distress syndrome, intensive care unit admission and death. RESULTS: We included 12 studies with 2794 patients, of whom 596 (21.33%) had severe disease. A slightly higher age was found in severe vs non-severe disease. We found that prevalent cerebrovascular disease (odds ratio [OR] 3.66, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.73-7.72), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR: 2.39, 95% CI 1.10-5.19), prevalent cardiovascular disease (OR: 2.84, 95% CI 1.59-5.10), diabetes (OR: 2.78, 95% CI 2.09-3.72), hypertension (OR: 2.24, 95% CI 1.63-3.08), smoking (OR: 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.22) and male sex (OR: 1.22, 95% CI 1.01-1.49) were associated with severe disease. Furthermore, increased procalcitonin (OR: 8.21, 95% CI 4.48-15.07), increased D-Dimer (OR: 5.67, 95% CI 1.45-22.16) and thrombocytopenia (OR: 3.61, 95% CI 2.62-4.97) predicted severe infection. CONCLUSION: Characteristics associated with the severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection may allow an early identification and management of patients with poor outcomes.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Procalcitonin/metabolism , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Smoking/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors
6.
Redox Biol ; 36: 101655, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-671830

ABSTRACT

Nox2 is responsible for artery dysfunction via production of reactive oxidant species. RNA viruses may activate Nox2, but it is unknown if this occurs in coronavirus 2019(Covid-19). Nox2 activation by soluble Nox2-derived peptide(sNox2-dp) was measured in patients hospitalized for Covid-19 (n = 182) and controls (n = 91). sNox2-dp values were higher in Covid-19 patients versus controls and in severe versus non severe Covid-19. Patients with thrombotic events(n = 35,19%) had higher sNox2-dp than thrombotic event-free ones. A logistic regression analysis showed that sNox2 and coronary heart disease predicted thrombotic events. Oxidative stress by Nox2 activation is associated severe disease and thrombotic events in Covid-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , NADPH Oxidase 2/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Thrombosis/blood , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , NADPH Oxidase 2/chemistry , Oxidative Stress , Pandemics , Peptide Fragments/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Thrombosis/etiology
7.
Nutrients ; 12(6)2020 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-574617

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (Sars-CoV-2) global pandemic is a devastating event that is causing thousands of victims every day around the world. One of the main reasons of the great impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on society is its unexpected spread, which has not allowed an adequate preparation. The scientific community is fighting against time for the production of a vaccine, but it is difficult to place a safe and effective product on the market as fast as the virus is spreading. Similarly, for drugs that can directly interfere with viral pathways, their production times are long, despite the great efforts made. For these reasons, we analyzed the possible role of non-pharmacological substances such as supplements, probiotics, and nutraceuticals in reducing the risk of Sars-CoV-2 infection or mitigating the symptoms of COVID-19. These substances could have numerous advantages in the current circumstances, are generally easily available, and have negligible side effects if administered at the already used and tested dosages. Large scientific evidence supports the benefits that some bacterial and molecular products may exert on the immune response to respiratory viruses. These could also have a regulatory role in systemic inflammation or endothelial damage, which are two crucial aspects of COVID-19. However, there are no specific data available, and rigorous clinical trials should be conducted to confirm the putative benefits of diet supplementation, probiotics, and nutraceuticals in the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diet therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diet , Dietary Supplements , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diet therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Probiotics/therapeutic use , Ascorbic Acid/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D/therapeutic use
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...