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Neurological Sciences ; 43(Supplement 1):S219, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2174296

ABSTRACT

Objectives: We performed a multicenter, prospective and retrospective, observational study, to evaluate the risk of disease relapse after COVID-19 vaccination in patients with chronic inflammatory neuropathies and the safety and tolerability of COVID-19 vaccines in these patients. Materials: Study subjects were chosen from among patients with CIDP or MMN included in the Italian CIDP and MMN databases. Method(s):We invited to participate CIDP and MMN patients fulfilling the EFNS/PNS criteria for probable/definite diagnosis who had been in a stable maintenance treatment or in remission without ongoing active treatment in the three months prior to the commencement of the study. We assessed the relative risk (RR) of relapse associated with COVID-19 vaccination by comparing patients who underwent or did not undergo vaccination. We also compared the frequency of relapse in CIDP and MMN patients undergoing vaccination for COVID-19 in the three months prior and after vaccination and evaluated safety and tolerability of the COVID-19 vaccines. Subjects were evaluated using objective outcome measures and a specific questionnaire. Result(s): A total of 336 patients were included (278 CIDP;58MMN). 307 (91%) patients underwent COVID-19 vaccination, including 269 (88%) with Pfizer/BioNTech, 28 (9%) with Moderna, and 10 (3%) with AstraZeneca. Twenty-nine patients (9%) did not undergo vaccination. Clinical relapse was observed in 16 (5.2%) patients (13 CIDP;3 MMN) who underwent COVID-19 vaccination and in none of the patients who did not undergo vaccination (RR= 3.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19-52.25). Compared to the 3-month control period preceding baseline, during which 4 (1.3%) of the 307 vaccinated patients had a disease relapse, the relative risk of relapse was increased. (RR: 4.00;95% CI, 1.35 to 11.82). The specific RR for Pfizer/BioNTech was 2.77 (95% CI, 0.16 - 45.74), and for Moderna was 9.31 (95% CI, 0.52 -165.33). None of the 10 patients who received the Astrazeneca vaccine had a relapse. The specific RR of relapse associated with COVID-19 vaccination in CIDP patients was 1.96 (95% CI, 0.12 to 31.81), while inMMN patients was 1.75 (95% CI, 0.09 - 31.64). The safety profile of the COVID-19 vaccines was similar to that observed in the general population. There were no serious adverse events. Discussion(s): Vaccination for COVID-19 in patients with CIDP and MMN seems to be associated with a small increased risk of disease relapse, and with an acceptable short-term safety profile. Conclusion(s): The benefits of COVID-19 vaccination in CIDP and MMN patients outweigh the risk of disease relapse.

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