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1.
Pediatr Crit Care Med ; 23(7): 535-543, 2022 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956633

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between nationwide school closures and prevalence of common admission diagnoses in the pediatric critical care unit. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: National database evaluation using the Virtual Pediatric Systems LLC database. PATIENTS: All patients admitted to the PICU in 81 contributing hospitals in the United States. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Diagnosis categories were determined for all 110,418 patients admitted during the 20-week study period in each year (2018, 2019, and 2020). Admission data were normalized relative to statewide school closure dates for each patient using geographic data. The "before school closure" epoch was defined as 8 weeks prior to school closure, and the "after school closure" epoch was defined as 12 weeks following school closure. For each diagnosis, admission ratios for each study day were calculated by dividing 2020 admissions by 2018-2019 admissions. The 10 most common diagnosis categories were examined. Significant changes in admission ratios were identified for bronchiolitis, pneumonia, and asthma. These changes occurred at 2, 8, and 35 days following school closure, respectively. PICU admissions decreased by 82% for bronchiolitis, 76% for pneumonia, and 76% for asthma. Nonrespiratory diseases such as diabetic ketoacidosis, status epilepticus, traumatic injury, and poisoning/ingestion did not show significant changes following school closure. CONCLUSIONS: School closures are associated with a dramatic reduction in the prevalence of severe respiratory disease requiring PICU admission. School closure may be an effective tool to mitigate future pandemics but should be balanced with potential academic, economic, mental health, and social consequences.


Subject(s)
Asthma , Bronchiolitis , Pneumonia , Child , Humans , Infant , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Patient Admission , Retrospective Studies , Schools , United States/epidemiology
3.
Front Pediatr ; 10: 812265, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775737

ABSTRACT

Importance: The incidence of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) increased early in the COVID-19 pandemic, but the relative contribution of behavioral changes and viral-related pathophysiology are unknown. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between school closure date and onset of increased DKA to help clarify the etiology of the increased incidence. Design: A multi-center, quality-controlled Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) database was used to identify the number of admissions to a participating PICU with DKA on each calendar day from 60 days before local school closure to 90 days after, and compared to baseline data from the same periods in 2018-2019. Interrupted time series and multiple linear regression analyses were used to identify admission rates that differed significantly between 2020 and baseline. Setting: Eighty-one PICUs in the United StatesParticipants: Children ages 29 days to 17 years admitted to a PICU with DKAExposures: Statewide school closureMain outcome/measure: Rate of admission to the PICU for DKA. Results: There were 1936 admissions for children with DKA in 2020 and 1795 admissions/year to those same PICUs in 2018-2019. Demographics and clinical outcomes did not differ before school closure, but pandemic-era patients were less often white and had longer hospital length of stay in the post-school closure period. The difference between 2020 admissions and 2018-2019 admissions was not different than zero before school closure, and significantly higher than zero after school closure, but was significantly increased in 2020 at >30 days after school closure (p = 0.039). Conclusions/Relevance: An increase in pediatric DKA admissions began one month after school closures. Given that behavioral changes started near school closure dates and viral activity peaked weeks after, this suggests that behavioral factors may not be the primary etiology and it is possible that SARS-CoV-2 infection may have direct effects on pediatric DKA.

5.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 11(5): 191-198, 2022 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621636

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is unclear how acute coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-directed therapies are used in children with life-threatening COVID-19 in US hospitals. We described characteristics of children hospitalized in the intensive care unit or step-down unit (ICU/SDU) who received COVID-19-directed therapies and the specific therapies administered. METHODS: Between March 15, 2020 and December 27, 2020, children <18 years of age in the ICU/SDU with acute COVID-19 at 48 pediatric hospitals in the United States were identified. Demographics, laboratory values, and clinical course were compared in children who did and did not receive COVID-19-directed therapies. Trends in COVID-19-directed therapies over time were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 424 children in the ICU/SDU, 235 (55%) received COVID-19-directed therapies. Children who received COVID-19-directed therapies were older than those who did not receive COVID-19-directed therapies (13.3 [5.6-16.2] vs 9.8 [0.65-15.9] years), more had underlying medical conditions (188 [80%] vs 104 [55%]; difference = 25% [95% CI: 16% to 34%]), more received respiratory support (206 [88%] vs 71 [38%]; difference = 50% [95% CI: 34% to 56%]), and more died (8 [3.4%] vs 0). Of the 235 children receiving COVID-19-directed therapies, 172 (73%) received systemic steroids and 150 (64%) received remdesivir, with rising remdesivir use over the study period (14% in March/April to 57% November/December). CONCLUSION: Despite the lack of pediatric data evaluating treatments for COVID-19 in critically ill children, more than half of children requiring intensive or high acuity care received COVID-19-directed therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/drug therapy , Child , Critical Illness , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Intensive Care Units , United States
6.
EClinicalMedicine ; 40: 101112, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1377702

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) consensus criteria were designed for maximal sensitivity and therefore capture patients with acute COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: We performed unsupervised clustering on data from 1,526 patients (684 labeled MIS-C by clinicians) <21 years old hospitalized with COVID-19-related illness admitted between 15 March 2020 and 31 December 2020. We compared prevalence of assigned MIS-C labels and clinical features among clusters, followed by recursive feature elimination to identify characteristics of potentially misclassified MIS-C-labeled patients. FINDINGS: Of 94 clinical features tested, 46 were retained for clustering. Cluster 1 patients (N = 498; 92% labeled MIS-C) were mostly previously healthy (71%), with mean age 7·2 ± 0·4 years, predominant cardiovascular (77%) and/or mucocutaneous (82%) involvement, high inflammatory biomarkers, and mostly SARS-CoV-2 PCR negative (60%). Cluster 2 patients (N = 445; 27% labeled MIS-C) frequently had pre-existing conditions (79%, with 39% respiratory), were similarly 7·4 ± 2·1 years old, and commonly had chest radiograph infiltrates (79%) and positive PCR testing (90%). Cluster 3 patients (N = 583; 19% labeled MIS-C) were younger (2·8 ± 2·0 y), PCR positive (86%), with less inflammation. Radiographic findings of pulmonary infiltrates and positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR accurately distinguished cluster 2 MIS-C labeled patients from cluster 1 patients. INTERPRETATION: Using a data driven, unsupervised approach, we identified features that cluster patients into a group with high likelihood of having MIS-C. Other features identified a cluster of patients more likely to have acute severe COVID-19 pulmonary disease, and patients in this cluster labeled by clinicians as MIS-C may be misclassified. These data driven phenotypes may help refine the diagnosis of MIS-C.

7.
ATS Sch ; 2(2): 185-192, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365987

ABSTRACT

The spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection across the world accelerated the adoption of social media as the platform of choice for real-time dissemination of medical information. Though this allowed useful clinical anecdotes and links to the latest articles related to COVID-19 to quickly circulate, the broad use of social media also highlighted the power of platforms such as Twitter to spread misinformation. Trainees in medicine have important perspectives to share on social media but may be reluctant to do so for a variety of reasons. There is a need to provide guidance on how to safely engage with social media as well as move the conversation forward in a meaningful way. In this manuscript, we suggest a stepwise approach for trainee social media engagement that integrates the modified Bloom's Taxonomy for social media with Aristotle's principles of rhetoric. This provides trainees with guidance on making ethical, logical, and persuasive cases on social media when creating, consuming, promoting, and discussing content produced by themselves or others.

8.
Chest ; 160(2): 529-537, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287509

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Children have been less affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, but its repercussions on pediatric illnesses may have been significant. This study examines the indirect impact of the pandemic on a population of critically ill children in the United States. RESEARCH QUESTION: Were there significantly fewer critically ill children admitted to PICUs during the second quarter of 2020, and were there significant changes in the types of diseases admitted? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: This retrospective observational cohort study used the Virtual Pediatric Systems database. Participants were 160,295 children admitted to the PICU at 77 sites in the United States during quarters 1 (Q1) and 2 (Q2) of 2017 to 2019 (pre-COVID-19) and 2020 (COVID-19). RESULTS: The average number of admissions was similar between pre-COVID-19 Q1 and COVID-19 Q1 but decreased by 32% from pre-COVID-19 Q2 to COVID-19 Q2 (20,157 to 13,627 admissions per quarter). The largest decreases were in respiratory conditions, including asthma (1,327 subjects in pre-COVID-19 Q2 (6.6% of patients) vs 241 subjects in COVID-19 Q2 (1.8%; P < .001) and bronchiolitis (1,299 [6.5%] vs 121 [0.9%]; P < .001). The percentage of trauma admissions increased, although the raw number of trauma admissions decreased. Admissions for diabetes mellitus and poisoning/ingestion also increased. In the multivariable model, illness severity-adjusted odds of ICU mortality for PICU patients during COVID-19 Q2 increased compared with pre-COVID-19 Q2 (OR, 1.165; 95% CI, 1.00-1.357; P = .049). INTERPRETATION: Pediatric critical illness admissions decreased substantially during the second quarter of 2020, with significant changes in the types of diseases seen in PICUs in the United States. There was an increase in mortality in children admitted to the PICU during this period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Facilities and Services Utilization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Retrospective Studies , United States
9.
N Engl J Med ; 385(1): 23-34, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270704

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The assessment of real-world effectiveness of immunomodulatory medications for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) may guide therapy. METHODS: We analyzed surveillance data on inpatients younger than 21 years of age who had MIS-C and were admitted to 1 of 58 U.S. hospitals between March 15 and October 31, 2020. The effectiveness of initial immunomodulatory therapy (day 0, indicating the first day any such therapy for MIS-C was given) with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) plus glucocorticoids, as compared with IVIG alone, was evaluated with propensity-score matching and inverse probability weighting, with adjustment for baseline MIS-C severity and demographic characteristics. The primary outcome was cardiovascular dysfunction (a composite of left ventricular dysfunction or shock resulting in the use of vasopressors) on or after day 2. Secondary outcomes included the components of the primary outcome, the receipt of adjunctive treatment (glucocorticoids in patients not already receiving glucocorticoids on day 0, a biologic, or a second dose of IVIG) on or after day 1, and persistent or recurrent fever on or after day 2. RESULTS: A total of 518 patients with MIS-C (median age, 8.7 years) received at least one immunomodulatory therapy; 75% had been previously healthy, and 9 died. In the propensity-score-matched analysis, initial treatment with IVIG plus glucocorticoids (103 patients) was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular dysfunction on or after day 2 than IVIG alone (103 patients) (17% vs. 31%; risk ratio, 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.94). The risks of the components of the composite outcome were also lower among those who received IVIG plus glucocorticoids: left ventricular dysfunction occurred in 8% and 17% of the patients, respectively (risk ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.19 to 1.15), and shock resulting in vasopressor use in 13% and 24% (risk ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.29 to 1.00). The use of adjunctive therapy was lower among patients who received IVIG plus glucocorticoids than among those who received IVIG alone (34% vs. 70%; risk ratio, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.65), but the risk of fever was unaffected (31% and 40%, respectively; risk ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.53 to 1.13). The inverse-probability-weighted analysis confirmed the results of the propensity-score-matched analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Among children and adolescents with MIS-C, initial treatment with IVIG plus glucocorticoids was associated with a lower risk of new or persistent cardiovascular dysfunction than IVIG alone. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/prevention & control , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Combined Modality Therapy , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunomodulation , Infant , Logistic Models , Male , Propensity Score , Public Health Surveillance , Shock/etiology , Shock/prevention & control , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality , Treatment Outcome , Ventricular Dysfunction, Left/etiology , Young Adult
10.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(6): e2116420, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263038

ABSTRACT

Importance: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is associated with recent or current SARS-CoV-2 infection. Information on MIS-C incidence is limited. Objective: To estimate population-based MIS-C incidence per 1 000 000 person-months and to estimate MIS-C incidence per 1 000 000 SARS-CoV-2 infections in persons younger than 21 years. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study used enhanced surveillance data to identify persons with MIS-C during April to June 2020, in 7 jurisdictions reporting to both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention national surveillance and to Overcoming COVID-19, a multicenter MIS-C study. Denominators for population-based estimates were derived from census estimates; denominators for incidence per 1 000 000 SARS-CoV-2 infections were estimated by applying published age- and month-specific multipliers accounting for underdetection of reported COVID-19 case counts. Jurisdictions included Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, New York (excluding New York City), and Pennsylvania. Data analyses were conducted from August to December 2020. Exposures: Race/ethnicity, sex, and age group (ie, ≤5, 6-10, 11-15, and 16-20 years). Main Outcomes and Measures: Overall and stratum-specific adjusted estimated MIS-C incidence per 1 000 000 person-months and per 1 000 000 SARS-CoV-2 infections. Results: In the 7 jurisdictions examined, 248 persons with MIS-C were reported (median [interquartile range] age, 8 [4-13] years; 133 [53.6%] male; 96 persons [38.7%] were Hispanic or Latino; 75 persons [30.2%] were Black). The incidence of MIS-C per 1 000 000 person-months was 5.1 (95% CI, 4.5-5.8) persons. Compared with White persons, incidence per 1 000 000 person-months was higher among Black persons (adjusted incidence rate ratio [aIRR], 9.26 [95% CI, 6.15-13.93]), Hispanic or Latino persons (aIRR, 8.92 [95% CI, 6.00-13.26]), and Asian or Pacific Islander (aIRR, 2.94 [95% CI, 1.49-5.82]) persons. MIS-C incidence per 1 000 000 SARS-CoV-2 infections was 316 (95% CI, 278-357) persons and was higher among Black (aIRR, 5.62 [95% CI, 3.68-8.60]), Hispanic or Latino (aIRR, 4.26 [95% CI, 2.85-6.38]), and Asian or Pacific Islander persons (aIRR, 2.88 [95% CI, 1.42-5.83]) compared with White persons. For both analyses, incidence was highest among children aged 5 years or younger (4.9 [95% CI, 3.7-6.6] children per 1 000 000 person-months) and children aged 6 to 10 years (6.3 [95% CI, 4.8-8.3] children per 1 000 000 person-months). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study, MIS-C was a rare complication associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Estimates for population-based incidence and incidence among persons with infection were higher among Black, Hispanic or Latino, and Asian or Pacific Islander persons. Further study is needed to understand variability by race/ethnicity and age group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Adolescent , Age Distribution , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
N Engl J Med ; 383(4): 334-346, 2020 07 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254114

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding the epidemiology and clinical course of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) and its temporal association with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is important, given the clinical and public health implications of the syndrome. METHODS: We conducted targeted surveillance for MIS-C from March 15 to May 20, 2020, in pediatric health centers across the United States. The case definition included six criteria: serious illness leading to hospitalization, an age of less than 21 years, fever that lasted for at least 24 hours, laboratory evidence of inflammation, multisystem organ involvement, and evidence of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) based on reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), antibody testing, or exposure to persons with Covid-19 in the past month. Clinicians abstracted the data onto standardized forms. RESULTS: We report on 186 patients with MIS-C in 26 states. The median age was 8.3 years, 115 patients (62%) were male, 135 (73%) had previously been healthy, 131 (70%) were positive for SARS-CoV-2 by RT-PCR or antibody testing, and 164 (88%) were hospitalized after April 16, 2020. Organ-system involvement included the gastrointestinal system in 171 patients (92%), cardiovascular in 149 (80%), hematologic in 142 (76%), mucocutaneous in 137 (74%), and respiratory in 131 (70%). The median duration of hospitalization was 7 days (interquartile range, 4 to 10); 148 patients (80%) received intensive care, 37 (20%) received mechanical ventilation, 90 (48%) received vasoactive support, and 4 (2%) died. Coronary-artery aneurysms (z scores ≥2.5) were documented in 15 patients (8%), and Kawasaki's disease-like features were documented in 74 (40%). Most patients (171 [92%]) had elevations in at least four biomarkers indicating inflammation. The use of immunomodulating therapies was common: intravenous immune globulin was used in 144 (77%), glucocorticoids in 91 (49%), and interleukin-6 or 1RA inhibitors in 38 (20%). CONCLUSIONS: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with SARS-CoV-2 led to serious and life-threatening illness in previously healthy children and adolescents. (Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/epidemiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation , Inflammation , Length of Stay , Male , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/epidemiology , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/therapy , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , United States
13.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(5): 536-547, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118065

ABSTRACT

Importance: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) affects the nervous system in adult patients. The spectrum of neurologic involvement in children and adolescents is unclear. Objective: To understand the range and severity of neurologic involvement among children and adolescents associated with COVID-19. Setting, Design, and Participants: Case series of patients (age <21 years) hospitalized between March 15, 2020, and December 15, 2020, with positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 test result (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and/or antibody) at 61 US hospitals in the Overcoming COVID-19 public health registry, including 616 (36%) meeting criteria for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children. Patients with neurologic involvement had acute neurologic signs, symptoms, or diseases on presentation or during hospitalization. Life-threatening involvement was adjudicated by experts based on clinical and/or neuroradiologic features. Exposures: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Main Outcomes and Measures: Type and severity of neurologic involvement, laboratory and imaging data, and outcomes (death or survival with new neurologic deficits) at hospital discharge. Results: Of 1695 patients (909 [54%] male; median [interquartile range] age, 9.1 [2.4-15.3] years), 365 (22%) from 52 sites had documented neurologic involvement. Patients with neurologic involvement were more likely to have underlying neurologic disorders (81 of 365 [22%]) compared with those without (113 of 1330 [8%]), but a similar number were previously healthy (195 [53%] vs 723 [54%]) and met criteria for multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (126 [35%] vs 490 [37%]). Among those with neurologic involvement, 322 (88%) had transient symptoms and survived, and 43 (12%) developed life-threatening conditions clinically adjudicated to be associated with COVID-19, including severe encephalopathy (n = 15; 5 with splenial lesions), stroke (n = 12), central nervous system infection/demyelination (n = 8), Guillain-Barré syndrome/variants (n = 4), and acute fulminant cerebral edema (n = 4). Compared with those without life-threatening conditions (n = 322), those with life-threatening neurologic conditions had higher neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios (median, 12.2 vs 4.4) and higher reported frequency of D-dimer greater than 3 µg/mL fibrinogen equivalent units (21 [49%] vs 72 [22%]). Of 43 patients who developed COVID-19-related life-threatening neurologic involvement, 17 survivors (40%) had new neurologic deficits at hospital discharge, and 11 patients (26%) died. Conclusions and Relevance: In this study, many children and adolescents hospitalized for COVID-19 or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children had neurologic involvement, mostly transient symptoms. A range of life-threatening and fatal neurologic conditions associated with COVID-19 infrequently occurred. Effects on long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes are unknown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Child, Preschool , Critical Care , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Nervous System Diseases/mortality , Patient Discharge/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology
15.
J Paediatr Child Health ; 56(7): 1010-1012, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-627212

ABSTRACT

Critical care management of patients with COVID-19 has been influenced by a mixture of public, media and societal pressure, as well as clinical and anecdotal observations from many prominent researchers and key opinion leaders. These factors may have affected the principles of evidence-based medicine and encouraged the widespread use of non-tested pharmacological and aggressive respiratory support therapies, even in intensive care units (ICUs). The COVID-19 pandemic has predominantly affected adult populations, while children appear to be relatively spared of severe disease. Notwithstanding, paediatric intensive care (PICU) clinicians may already have been influenced by changes in practices of adult ICUs, and these changes may pose unintended consequences to the vulnerable population in the PICU. In this article, we analyse several potential iatrogenic causes of the detrimental effects of the current pandemic to children and highlight the risks underlying a sudden change of clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Illness/therapy , Evidence-Based Medicine , Iatrogenic Disease/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Medical Errors , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Pediatr Crit Care Med ; 21(8): e538-e546, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-380723

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the impact of a strategy for international collaboration and rapid information dissemination on Twitter among the pediatric critical care community during a global pandemic. DESIGN: Analysis of #PedsICU and coronavirus disease 2019 Twitter data in the Symplur Signals Database between February 1, 2020, and May 1, 2020. SETTING: Social media platform Twitter. PATIENTS: None. INTERVENTIONS: Promotion of the joint usage of #PedsICU and #COVID19 throughout the international pediatric critical care community in tweets relevant to the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and pediatric critical care. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We collected data on all tweets containing the hashtag #PedsICU in addition to those containing both #PedsICU and coronavirus disease 2019 hashtags. Tweets including #PedsICU were shared 49,865 times on six continents between February 1, 2020, and May 1, 2020; between February 1 and March 13, only 8% of #PedsICU tweets included a coronavirus disease 2019 hashtag. After a sharp rise during the week of March 14, 2020, coronavirus disease 2019 content has dominated the #PedsICU conversation on Twitter, comprising 69% of both #PedsICU tweets and impressions (p < 0.001). The most commonly used coronavirus disease 2019 hashtag over the study period was #COVID19 (69%). Proportionately, a greater percentage of #PedsICU tweets including the coronavirus disease 2019 hashtag (vs not) had images or videos (45% vs 41%; p < 0.001). In addition, non-physician healthcare providers were the largest group of users (46%) of the combination of #PedsICU and coronavirus disease 2019 hashtags. The most popular tweets shared on Twitter were open-access resources, including links for updated literature, narrative reviews, and educational videos relevant to coronavirus disease 2019 clinical care. Concurrent hashtags and words in tweets containing #PedsICU and coronavirus disease 2019 hashtags spanned several different disciplines and topics in pediatric critical care. CONCLUSION: Twitter has been used widely for real-time information sharing and collaboration among the international pediatric critical care community during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Targeted use of #PedsICU and #COVID19 for engagement on Twitter is a conduit to combat misinformation and optimize reach to pediatric critical care stakeholders across the globe when rapid dissemination is needed.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Information Dissemination/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Critical Care/organization & administration , Global Health , Humans , Pandemics , Pediatrics , SARS-CoV-2
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