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1.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; 226(1):S627-S627, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1624384
2.
Biomedical Signal Processing and Control ; 73, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1568534

ABSTRACT

An approach based on fractal scaling analysis to characterize the organization of the SARS-CoV-2 genome sequence was used. The method is based on the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) implemented on a sliding window scheme to detect variations of long-range correlations over the genome sequence regions. The nucleotides sequence is mapped in a numerical sequence by using four different assignation rules: amino-keto, purine-pyrimidine, hydrogen-bond and hydrophobicity patterns. The originally reported sequence from Wuhan isolates (Wuhan Hu-1) was considered as a reference to contrast the structure of the 2002–2004 SARS-CoV-1 strain. Long-range correlations, quantified in terms of a scaling exponent, depended on both the mapping rule and the sequence region. Deviations from randomness were attributed to serial correlations or anti-correlations, which can be ascribed to ordered regions of the genome sequence. It was found that the Wuhan Hu-1 sequence was more random than the SARS-CoV-1 sequence, which suggests that the SARS-CoV-2 possesses a more efficient genomic structure for replication and infection. In general, the virus isolated in the early 2020 months showed slight correlation differences with the Wuhan Hu-1 sequence. However, early isolates from India and Italy presented visible differences that led to a more ordered sequence organization. It is apparent that the increased sequence order, particularly in the spike region, endowed some early variants with a more efficient mechanism to spreading, replicating and infecting. Overall, the results showed that the DFA provides a suitable framework to assess long-term correlations hidden in the internal organization of the SARS-CoV-2 genome sequence.

3.
Reproductive Sciences ; 28(SUPPL 1):310A-311A, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1338044
4.
Journal of Experimental Medicine ; 218(7), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1327310

ABSTRACT

Patients with biallelic loss-of-function variants of AIRE suffer from autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type-1 (APS-1) and produce a broad range of autoantibodies (auto-Abs), including circulating auto-Abs neutralizing most type I interferons (IFNs). These auto-Abs were recently reported to account for at least 10% of cases of life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia in the general population. We report 22 APS-1 patients from 21 kindreds in seven countries, aged between 8 and 48 yr and infected with SARS-CoV-2 since February 2020. The 21 patients tested had auto-Abs neutralizing IFN-a subtypes and/or IFN-;one had anti-IFN-beta and another anti-IFN-T, but none had anti-IFN-. Strikingly, 19 patients (86%) were hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia, including 15 (68%) admitted to an intensive care unit, 11 (50%) who required mechanical ventilation, and four (18%) who died. Ambulatory disease in three patients (14%) was possibly accounted for by prior or early specific interventions. Preexisting auto-Abs neutralizing type I IFNs in APS-1 patients confer a very high risk of life-threatening COVID-19 pneumonia at any age.

5.
J Trauma Stress ; 34(4): 701-710, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303282

ABSTRACT

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many individuals have experienced disruptions in social, occupational, and daily life activities. Individuals with mental health difficulties, particularly those with elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), may be especially vulnerable to increased impairment as a result of COVID-19. Additionally, demographic factors, such as age, gender, and race/ethnicity, may impact individual difficulties related to the pandemic. The current study examined the concurrent and prospective associations between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, broader anxiety and depression symptoms, and COVID-19-related disability. Participants recruited through Amazon's Mechanical Turk (N = 136) completed questionnaire batteries approximately 1 month apart during the COVID-19 pandemic (i.e., Wave 1 and Wave 2). The results indicated that PTSD, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were all associated with increased COVID-19-related disability across assessment points, rs = .44-.68. PTSD symptoms, specifically negative alterations in cognition and mood, significantly predicted COVID-19-related disability after accounting for anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as demographic factors, ßs = .31-.38. Overall, these findings suggest that individuals experiencing elevated PTSS are particularly vulnerable to increased functional impairment as a result of COVID-19 and suggest a need for additional outreach and clinical care among individuals with elevated PTSD symptoms during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Disabled Persons/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Crowdsourcing/methods , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
6.
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology ; 224(2):S98-S99, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1141150
7.
Banking Law Journal ; 137(10):539-553, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1089425

ABSTRACT

This article delineates the timelines for banks to implement the current expected credit loss ("CECL") model and examines the impact of the model on the timeliness of the financial information provided by banks about their loan loss allowances. Further, the article examines how the combination of CECL and the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic dramatically increase the estimation uncertainly of banks' loan loss allowances, and thus the potential for the Securities and Exchange Commission, bank regulators, and shareholders to question banks' CECL estimates in hindsight as the effects of the pandemic are observed. © 2020 Sheshunoff Information Services. All rights reserved.

8.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 31:270, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-984182

ABSTRACT

Background: HD units are clustered close contact environments where prolonged and repeated exposure to blood borne pathogens occurs. Weeks into the CoVID-19 pandemic, wide disparities in rates of death and exposure of staff and patients amongst HD units in the same zip code of an epicenter in New York regions emerged. Methods: Random HD units surveyed as to when and what infection control measures they implemented. Direct input into RedCap and SAS 9.0 analysis of the data conducted. Results: 15 HD units (average census 18-240) responded. Survey compiled exposure rates from 3/1/20 - 4/30/20. The 1st reported case of CoVID-19 by a facility was 3/2/20. Most facilities reported outbreaks (4-30 cases per facility) by 3/21/20. Missed HD sessions due to CoVID varied from 2-100, hospital stays for such patients varied from 2-20 days and death rates from 0-15 per facility. 4 of 15 facilities reported deaths of family members of exposed patients and impediments in logistics of single person transportation forcing carpooling. Home dialysis programs reported minimal deaths and exposures. 20% of facilities had no infection preventionist and 26% no patient educator. Reported waiting area cleaning and hand sanitizer refill rates ranged from 1-5 times per day. 20% of the facilities have < 6 feet distance between patients. Implementation of infection control practices such as wearing of masks by patients varied widely amongst units. Some started March 1st-March 16th, some later due to mixed messages of its importance. Lack of personal protective equipment (PPE)(in 13% of facilities), staff, and housekeeping shortages (6.7-13.3%) compounded the problems. Positive CoVID results had 1-10 staff members infected per facility with sick call rates from 7-30 days, and no staff death. 46% of the HD units don't belong to the CDC coalition. Conclusions: Maintenance of strict hand hygiene, proper air flow, repeated environmental surface cleansing, availability of PPE, and patient and staff education remain the corner stone in preventing infections from spreading. Lack of leadership support and failing to share best practices between dialysis units in the US remains prohibitive but must be encouraged and standardized.

9.
ASSETS - Int. ACM SIGACCESS Conf. Comput. Access. ; 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-961145

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced institutions to rapidly alter their behavior, which typically has disproportionate negative effects on people with disabilities as accessibility is overlooked. To investigate these issues, we analyzed Twitter data to examine accessibility problems surfaced by the crisis. We identified three key domains at the intersection of accessibility and technology: (i) the allocation of product delivery services, (ii) the transition to remote education, and (iii) the dissemination of public health information. We found that essential retailers expanded their high-risk customer shopping hours and pick-up and delivery services, but individuals with disabilities still lacked necessary access to goods and services. Long-experienced access barriers to online education were exacerbated by the abrupt transition of in-person to remote instruction. Finally, public health messaging has been inconsistent and inaccessible, which is unacceptable during a rapidly-evolving crisis. We argue that organizations should create flexible, accessible technology and policies in calm times to be adaptable in times of crisis to serve individuals with diverse needs. © 2020 Owner/Author.

10.
Journal of Latin American Geography ; 19(4):6-8, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-955358
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