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1.
AIDS Behav ; 26(10): 3289-3299, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1787836

ABSTRACT

People with HIV (PWH) have a high burden of medical comorbidities, potentially putting them at increased risk for severe COVID-19. Additionally, during the COVID-19 pandemic, HIV care delivery has been restructured and the impact on HIV outcomes is unknown. The objectives of this study were first, to examine the risk of severe COVID-19 among PWH, using a definition incorporating clinical risk factors, and second, to examine the pandemic's impact on HIV care. We used data from the DC Cohort, a large cohort of people receiving HIV care in Washington, DC. We found that a high proportion of participants across all age groups qualified as increased (58%) or high risk (34%) for severe COVID-19. Between 2019 and 2020, encounters increased (17.7%, increasing to 23.5% of active DC Cohort participants had an encounter) while laboratory utilization decreased (14.4%, decreasing to 11.4% of active DC Cohort participants had an HIV RNA test performed). Implications of our work include the importance of protecting vulnerable people with HIV from acquiring COVID-19 and potentially manifesting severe complications through strategies including vaccination. Additionally, acknowledging that HIV service delivery will likely be changed long-term by the pandemic, adaptation is required to ensure continued progress towards 90-90-90 goals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , District of Columbia/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
2.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-9, 2022 Mar 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730415

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The George Washington University (GW) in Washington, D.C., USA established the Public Health Laboratory and Campus COVID-19 Support Team (CCST) to develop and implement its SARS-CoV-2 surveillance testing and outbreak response for the 2020-2021 academic year. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Approximately 4,000 GW members had access to campus for living accommodations, limited in-person instruction, athletics, research, and university operations. The outbreak response included daily risk assessment surveys, weekly surveillance testing, symptomatic and voluntary testing, case investigation, and contact tracing. RESULTS: Between August 17 - November 24, 2020, 42,350 SARS-CoV-2 PCR tests were performed, and 194 (0.46%) of tests were positive. Surveillance testing identified 59 (30.4%); voluntary testing 97 (50%); and symptomatic testing 30 (15.5%) of the cases, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Robust testing of asymptomatic people and rapid isolation and quarantine of members who are exposed or infected effectively limited the spread of SARS-CoV-2 during the Fall 2020 semester.

3.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0249740, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Central to measuring the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on HIV is understanding the role of loss of access to essential HIV prevention and care services created by clinic and community-based organization closures. In this paper, we use a comprehensive list of HIV prevention services in four corridors of the US heavily impacted by HIV, developed as part of a large RCT, to illustrate the potential impact of service closure on LGBTQ+ youth. METHODS: We identified and mapped LGBTQ+ friendly services offering at least one of the following HIV-related services: HIV testing; STI testing; PrEP/PEP; HIV treatment and care; and other HIV-related services in 109 counties across four major interstate corridors heavily affected by HIV US Census regions: Pacific (San Francisco, CA to San Diego, CA); South-Atlantic (Washington, DC to Atlanta, GA); East-North-Central (Chicago, IL to Detroit, MI); and East-South-Central (Memphis, TN to New Orleans, LA). RESULTS: There were a total of 831 LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers across the 109 counties. There was a range of LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV-service provider availability across counties (range: 0-14.33 per 10,000 youth aged 13-24 (IQR: 2.13), median: 1.09); 9 (8.26%) analyzed counties did not have any LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the correlation between county HIV prevalence and LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service provider density was 0.16 (p = 0.09), suggesting only a small, non-statistically significant linear relationship between a county's available LGBTQ+ youth-friendly HIV service providers and their HIV burden. CONCLUSIONS: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, we must find novel, affordable ways to continue to provide sexual health, mental health and other support services to LGBTQ+ youth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics , Sexual and Gender Minorities/education , Adolescent , Adult , Humans , Prevalence , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
AIDS Rev ; 22(3): 133-142, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-895866

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the cause of COVID-19, was first detected in China in December 2019 and has rapidly spread throughout the world. Globally, the impact of COVID-19 has been severe with more than half a million deaths over 6 months; in contrast, the HIV pandemic has resulted in over 32 million deaths worldwide over 40 years. This paper reviews the current epidemiology of COVID-19, summarizes its relationship to HIV, identifies synergies in our response, and suggests actions that can be taken to curtail the spread of COVID-19 among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Our understanding of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, prevention, and treatment of COVID-19 has evolved rapidly as they did with HIV. Epidemiologically, there are similarities between the two viruses including asymptomatic spread, disproportionate impact on persons of color, need for rapid diagnostic testing, and lack of a cure or vaccine. PLWH do not appear generally to have an increased incidence of COVID-19 infection or a more severe course of disease. Clinical trials to identify potential treatment and prevention options for COVID-19 have included antiretrovirals used to treat HIV that have not been efficacious. Public health responses overlap between the two pandemics including the need for behavior change and containment strategies such as contact tracing. As the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic evolves, the path forward to controlling, preventing, and treating COVID-19 can be informed by lessons learned from HIV as we seek to control the spread of both viral pandemics.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/complications , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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