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1.
Int J Urol ; 28(9): 950-954, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280320

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess if the lockdown period (March-April 2020) during the coronavirus disease-19 outbreak in Italy influenced the number, presentation, and treatment of urgent admissions to the emergency department for ureteral lithiasis, and to evaluate the same variables during the reopening phase (May-June 2020). METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to the emergency department of three different hospitals (two coronavirus disease-19 hubs). Demographics and data on acute pyelonephritis, acute kidney injury, urinoma, hematuria, inpatient admission/discharge home, and type of treatment were gathered and compared with the same periods in 2019. RESULTS: A total of 516 patients were admitted during the study period, of whom 62.4% were male. Their mean age was 58.86 ± 16.24 years. The number of admissions decreased significantly, by 51.25% (P = 0.003), during lockdown compared to 2019 (78 vs 160 admissions). The number of admissions in the reopening phase (May-June 2020) was in line with that in 2019 (n = 138). The number of hospitalizations (P = 0.005), acute obstructive pyelonephritis (P = 0.019), and complications (P = 0.02) was statistically significantly higher during lockdown compared to 2019. The increase in the rate of surgical procedures nearly reached significance (P = 0.059). The odds of having complications and being hospitalized were almost fivefold (odds ratio 4.68, 95% confidence interval 1.98-11.07) and twofold greater (odds ratio 2.39, 95% confidence interval 1.29-4.43) compared to the same period in 2019. No difference was noted between May-June 2020 and 2019. CONCLUSION: The coronavirus disease-19 lockdown period provoked a meaningful reduction in symptomatic ureteral lithiasis admission. Most patients presented with complicated disease, which required an increased rate of interventional procedures compared to the equivalent period in 2019. Admissions reverted to normal levels during the reopening phase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urolithiasis , Adult , Aged , Communicable Disease Control , Disease Outbreaks , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Urolithiasis/epidemiology , Urolithiasis/therapy
3.
World J Urol ; 39(12): 4295-4303, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241604

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the cancellation or deferment of many elective cancer surgeries. We performed a systematic review on the oncological effects of delayed surgery for patients with localised or metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in the targeted therapy (TT) era. METHOD: The protocol of this review is registered on PROSPERO(CRD42020190882). A comprehensive literature search was performed on Medline, Embase and Cochrane CENTRAL using MeSH terms and keywords for randomised controlled trials and observational studies on the topic. Risks of biases were assessed using the Cochrane RoB tool and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. For localised RCC, immediate surgery [including partial nephrectomy (PN) and radical nephrectomy (RN)] and delayed surgery [including active surveillance (AS) and delayed intervention (DI)] were compared. For metastatic RCC, upfront versus deferred cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN) were compared. RESULTS: Eleven studies were included for quantitative analysis. Delayed surgery was significantly associated with worse cancer-specific survival (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.23-2.27, p < 0.01) in T1a RCC, but no significant difference was noted for overall survival. For localised ≥ T1b RCC, there were insufficient data for meta-analysis and the results from the individual reports were contradictory. For metastatic RCC, upfront TT followed by deferred CN was associated with better overall survival when compared to upfront CN followed by deferred TT (HR 0.61, 95% CI 0.43-0.86, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Noting potential selection bias, there is insufficient evidence to support the notion that delayed surgery is safe in localised RCC. For metastatic RCC, upfront TT followed by deferred CN should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Time-to-Treatment , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/pathology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Nephrectomy , Survival Rate
4.
Urology ; 156: 52-57, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065642

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To understand the preference and role of 'hybrid' urological meetings compared to face-to-face and online meetings during and after COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary outcome was finding out the most preferable webinar setting. METHODS: An online global survey was done between June 06 and July 05, 2020, using SurveyMonkey. The target participants were urology healthcare providers. The survey was disseminated via mailing lists and the Twitter platform. RESULTS: A total of 526 urology providers from 56 countries responded to the survey and it was completed by 73.3%. Participants' overall experience was better in a face-to-face meeting, followed by a hybrid and webinar only meeting. While opportunities for networking was identified as high in face-to-face meeting, online webinars were more cost effective, and learning opportunity and reach of audience was higher for hybrid meetings. For online webinar format, Zoom platform was used by 73% and majority (69%) saw it on their laptop or desktop. The preference was for a 1-hour webinar in the evenings with 3-5 speakers. Urology residents rated face-to-face meetings to have better cost-effectiveness when compared to consultants. Post COVID-19, more than half of all respondents would prefer hybrid meetings compared to the other formats. CONCLUSION: While there will be a place for face-to-face meetings, COVID-19 situation has led to a preference towards hybrid meetings which is ideal for a global reach in the future. It is plausible that most urological associations will move towards a hybrid model for their meetings.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic/organization & administration , Urology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Congresses as Topic/economics , Female , Humans , Internet/economics , Internship and Residency , Learning , Male , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Networking , Software , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urology/education
5.
J Endourol Case Rep ; 6(4): 402-404, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-835070

ABSTRACT

Background: Because of the fear of being infected with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), patients with nephrolithiasis, who choose to stay home, may suffer serious complications such as obstructive uropathy, deterioration of renal function, sepsis, and death. We present such a case that led to renal failure and necessitated emergent urologic intervention. Case Presentation: A 60-year-old Caucasian man presented with right flank pain, dizziness, and dyspnea at the emergency room. History was significant for a previous diagnosis of right renal pelvic stone that was scheduled for retrograde intrarenal surgery before the pandemic lockdown. Upon evaluation, he was found to have an elevated creatinine of 40.2 mg/dL, bilateral hydronephrosis, pericardial and pleural effusion. The patient underwent emergency hemodialysis, followed by preliminary bilateral percutaneous nephrostomy, and subsequently by ureteral stenting. He was discharged stable with the future plan for endoscopic stone management. Conclusions: In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, urologists should follow up all known kidney stone patients, regularly assess their condition, and prioritize those who need urgent care. Patient education and telemedicine are useful tools for this purpose and may help minimize the risk of complications during a community lockdown.

6.
Eur Urol ; 78(2): 265-275, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-598126

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) declared coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) as a pandemic on March 11, 2020. The impact of COVID-19 on urological services in different geographical areas is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the global impact of COVID-19 on urological providers and the provision of urological patient care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional, web-based survey was conducted from March 30, 2020 to April 7, 2020. A 55-item questionnaire was developed to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on various aspects of urological services. Target respondents were practising urologists, urology trainees, and urology nurses/advanced practice providers. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The primary outcome was the degree of reduction in urological services, which was further stratified by the geographical location, degree of outbreak, and nature and urgency of urological conditions. The secondary outcome was the duration of delay in urological services. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: A total of 1004 participants responded to our survey, and they were mostly based in Asia, Europe, North America, and South America. Worldwide, 41% of the respondents reported that their hospital staff members had been diagnosed with COVID-19 infection, 27% reported personnel shortage, and 26% had to be deployed to take care of COVID-19 patients. Globally, only 33% of the respondents felt that they were given adequate personal protective equipment, and many providers expressed fear of going to work (47%). It was of concerning that 13% of the respondents were advised not to wear a surgical face mask for the fear of scaring their patients, and 21% of the respondents were advised not to discuss COVID-19 issues or concerns on media. COVID-19 had a global impact on the cut-down of urological services, including outpatient clinic appointments, outpatient investigations and procedures, and urological surgeries. The degree of cut-down of urological services increased with the degree of COVID-19 outbreak. On average, 28% of outpatient clinics, 30% of outpatient investigations and procedures, and 31% of urological surgeries had a delay of >8 wk. Urological services for benign conditions were more affected than those for malignant conditions. Finally, 47% of the respondents believed that the accumulated workload could be dealt with in a timely manner after the COVID-19 outbreak, but 50% thought the postponement of urological services would affect the treatment and survival outcomes of their patients. One of the limitations of this study is that Africa, Australia, and New Zealand were under-represented. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 had a profound global impact on urological care and urology providers. The degree of cut-down of urological services increased with the degree of COVID-19 outbreak and was greater for benign than for malignant conditions. One-fourth of urological providers were deployed to assist with COVID-19 care. Many providers reported insufficient personal protective equipment and support from hospital administration. PATIENT SUMMARY: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) has led to significant delay in outpatient care and surgery in urology, particularly in regions with the most COVID-19 cases. A considerable proportion of urology health care professionals have been deployed to assist in COVID-19 care, despite the perception of insufficient training and protective equipment.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Surveys and Questionnaires , Urologic Diseases/therapy , Urologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Urologists/statistics & numerical data , Urology/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Diseases/complications , Urologic Diseases/epidemiology , Workload
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