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2.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 40(16), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009641

ABSTRACT

Background: Prognosis of COVID-19 is poor in the setting of immunosuppression. Casirivimab/imdevimab (REGEN-COV), bamlanivimab, and sotrovimab are investigational monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) authorized for treatment of mild/moderate COVID-19 for patients (pts) 12 years or older and who are at high-risk for progression to severe COVID-19. These neutralizing antibodies, against SARS-CoV-2 spike proteins, have been shown to decrease risk of progression to severe disease. Recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants (allo-SCT) or chimeric antigen T cell therapy (CAR T cell) represent a high risk population. However, treatment outcomes with these MoAbs in these pts are not well described. Methods: This retrospective study included 33 consecutive adult pts who developed mild/moderate COVID-19 and received anti-spike SARS-CoV-2 MoAbs between December 2020 and November 2021. Allo-SCT (N=27) or CAR T cell (N=6) recipients were included, and outcomes were analyzed separately. Pts received REGEN-COV (N=19), bamlanivimab (N=11), or sotrovimab (N=1), missing (N=2). Results: In the allo-SCT cohort (N=27), median age at time of COVID-19 was 55 (23-76) years. Median time from allo-SCT to COVID-19 was 31 (22-64) months. Two pts received CAR T-cell therapy prior to allo-SCT. Diagnoses included leukemia or myeloid diseases (82%), lymphoma (11%), or myeloma (7%). Transplant characteristics are summarized (Table). Thirteen pts were vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2 prior to breakthrough COVID-19. Events considered included hospitalization due to COVID- 19, disease progression, or death from any cause. The 6-month event-free and overall survivals were 81% and 91%, respectively. In the CAR T cell recipients cohort (N=6), 4 pts received axicabtagene ciloleucel for diffuse large B-cell or follicular lymphoma and 2 received brexucabtagene autoleucel for mantle cell lymphoma. The median follow-up was 8 (1-11) months. Two pts received autologous SCT prior to COVID-19. Median time from CAR T cell therapy to COVID-19 was 10 (3-24) months. Three pts were vaccinated prior to COVID-19. Only 1 pt was hospitalized due to severe COVID- 19 requiring mechanical ventilation leading to death. Conclusions: These results show a potential benefit of MoAbs in high-risk pts, namely allo-SCT or CAR T cell recipients. Future studies should evaluate the role of prophylactic use MoAbs in these populations. A comparative analysis with a matched control cohort (who did not receive MoAbs) will be provided at the meeting.

3.
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar ; 50(4), 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1801415

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In 2020, an exponential growth and accelerated expansion of COVID-19 was observed. Cuba had 20 hospitals ready for medical care, some 5,000 hospital beds and 477 intensive therapy beds. Objective: Describe the cost of the main assistance and logistics assurance services during the response to COVID-19. Methods: A descriptive and prospective study was carried out in 363 patients, between March 12 and May 30, 2020. The variables studied were patient-day, bed-day, medications, medical supplies, food, clothing, cost per salary and energy power consumed. To obtain the total cost of a patient-day, the fixed and variable costs were added, expressed in Cuban pesos CUP. Results: In the COVID-suspects patient ward, a high number of patient-day (14 578) and a low number of bed-day (5 976) were observed. The average cost per salary was higher in nursing (226,2 CUP). Medications generated at high cost (35,6 %). In April, the highest electricity consumption was recorded (36,6 %) and a cost of 18,071.1 CUP. In relation to the total number of patient-day, an increase in fixed costs (87,30 %) was observed over the variables. Conclusions: The analysis of the cost of patient day-during the COVID-19 pandemic allowed to detail, by hospitalization wards, how much the expenses vary between healthcare services and logistics assurance, as well as the differences between fixed and variable costs. © 2021, Editorial Ciencias Medicas. All rights reserved.

4.
Blood ; 138:1750, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1582231

ABSTRACT

Background:COVID-19 adversely affects individuals with cancer. Several studies have found that seroconversion rates among patients with hematologic malignancies are suboptimal when compared to patients without cancer. Among patients with hematologic malignancies, seroconversion rates also appear to be influenced by recent treatment and the type of treatment they have received. Patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM) are immunocompromised due to impaired humoral and cellular immunity in addition to prescribed immunosuppressive therapy. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR T) therapy is now widely used for NHL and MM, but little is known about seroconversion rates after COVID-19 vaccination among these populations. Current national guidelines recommend COVID-19 vaccination to be offered to CAR T recipients as early as three months thereafter. We retrospectively evaluated SARS-CoV-2 spike-binding IgG antibody levels following COVID-19 vaccination among NHL and MM CAR T therapy recipients. Methods:This retrospective study was conducted at three Mayo Clinic sites on NHL and MM patients that received CAR T infusions from Sept 2016 to June 2021. Baseline characteristics were ascertained from medical records. All NHL and MM patients who had received CAR T at any point and were alive at the time that the COVID-19 vaccine first became available were eligible for inclusion for antibody response evaluation. For antibody response to vaccination, antibody spike values > 0.80 U/mL were considered positive. Results: Out of 104 CAR T infusions, 73 patients are alive at the time of this submission. We have had 7 patients with known COVID-19 pre-CAR T and all 7 are currently alive (5 have antibody titers and 2 have not been tested yet). Nineteen patients developed known COVID infection post-CAR T (13 alive and 6 deceased). The mortality of COVID post-CAR T in our sample was 31.5%. Furthermore, of the 13 patients that survived COVID-19, they received CAR T an average of 416 days prior to COVID-19 infection (median = 337, range = 54 - 1406);the 6 patients who died from COVID-19 had received CAR T an average of 250 days prior to COVID-19 infection (median = 164, range = 7 - 846). All 6 deceased patients did not receive COVID-19 vaccination pre-CAR T. Out of 17 CAR T patients tested for antibody spike titers post COVID-19 vaccination, 76.4% were able to mount an antibody response. More patients with MM had a higher titer response to the vaccine (>250 U/mL) compared to the NHL counterparts (0.80-249 U/mL). All patients that received the vaccine, regardless of antibody response, were alive at the time of this submission. Conclusions:The majority of CAR T recipients with NHL and MM are able to mount an antibody response following COVID-19 vaccination in our relatively small sample. The frequency of seroconversion among CAR T recipients seems to be similar to patients with hematologic malignancy who had received a hematopoietic cell transplant reported elsewhere. These findings are limited by our small sample size and may be influenced by the timing of vaccination relative to CAR T. Furthermore, almost half of our patients received IVIG post CAR T which could potentially cause false positive antibody results as pooled immunoglobulin preparations may contain COVID-19 antibodies from vaccinated healthy donors. To better understand the characteristics of the immunologic response against SARS-CoV-2 in patients post-CAR T, larger multicenter studies exploring both humoral and cellular immunity will be needed. JEWN, MI and JM are co-first authors and PV, HM and AR are co-senior authors. [Formula presented] Disclosures: Munoz: Physicians' Education Resource: Honoraria;Seattle Genetics: Honoraria;Bayer: Research Funding;Gilead/Kite Pharma: Research Funding;Celgene: Research Funding;Merck: Research Funding;Portola: Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;Pharmacyclics: Research Funding;Seattle Genetics: Research Funding;Janssen: Research Funding;Millennium: Research Funding;Gilea /Kite Pharma, Kyowa, Bayer, Pharmacyclics/Janssen, Seattle Genetics, Acrotech/Aurobindo, Beigene, Verastem, AstraZeneca, Celgene/BMS, Genentech/Roche.: Speakers Bureau;Pharmacyclics/Abbvie, Bayer, Gilead/Kite Pharma, Pfizer, Janssen, Juno/Celgene, BMS, Kyowa, Alexion, Beigene, Fosunkite, Innovent, Seattle Genetics, Debiopharm, Karyopharm, Genmab, ADC Therapeutics, Epizyme, Beigene, Servier: Consultancy;Targeted Oncology: Honoraria;OncView: Honoraria;Kyowa: Honoraria. Bergsagel: Oncopeptides: Consultancy, Honoraria;Novartis: Consultancy, Honoraria, Patents & Royalties: human CRBN mouse;Pfizer: Consultancy, Honoraria;Celgene: Consultancy, Honoraria;Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria;Genetech: Consultancy, Honoraria;GSK: Consultancy, Honoraria. Wang: Incyte: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;LOXO Oncology: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Genentech: Research Funding;InnoCare: Research Funding;Novartis: Research Funding;MorphoSys: Research Funding;Eli Lilly: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;TG Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Fonseca: Juno: Consultancy;Kite: Consultancy;Aduro: Consultancy;OncoTracker: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;GSK: Consultancy;AbbVie: Consultancy;Patent: Prognosticaton of myeloma via FISH: Patents & Royalties;Caris Life Sciences: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;Scientific Advisory Board: Adaptive Biotechnologies: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees;BMS: Consultancy;Amgen: Consultancy;Sanofi: Consultancy;Merck: Consultancy;Mayo Clinic in Arizona: Current Employment;Celgene: Consultancy;Takeda: Consultancy;Bayer: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy;Novartis: Consultancy;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy. Palmer: Sierra Oncology: Consultancy, Research Funding;CTI BioPharma: Consultancy, Research Funding;Protagonist: Consultancy, Research Funding;Incyte: Research Funding;PharmaEssentia: Research Funding. Dingli: Novartis: Research Funding;GSK: Consultancy;Apellis: Consultancy;Alexion: Consultancy;Sanofi: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy. Kapoor: Sanofi: Research Funding;AbbVie: Research Funding;Takeda: Research Funding;Karyopharm: Consultancy;Cellectar: Consultancy;BeiGene: Consultancy;Pharmacyclics: Consultancy;Sanofi: Consultancy;Amgen: Research Funding;Ichnos Sciences: Research Funding;Regeneron Pharmaceuticals: Research Funding;Glaxo SmithKline: Research Funding;Karyopharm: Research Funding. Kumar: Roche-Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding;Oncopeptides: Consultancy;Abbvie: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;BMS: Consultancy, Research Funding;Beigene: Consultancy;Celgene: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Novartis: Research Funding;Adaptive: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Astra-Zeneca: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Tenebio: Research Funding;Merck: Research Funding;Carsgen: Research Funding;KITE: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Janssen: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Takeda: Consultancy, Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees, Research Funding;Amgen: Consultancy, Research Funding;Bluebird Bio: Consultancy;Antengene: Consultancy, Honoraria;Sanofi: Research Funding. Paludo: Karyopharm: Research Funding. Bennani: Kymera: Other: Advisory Board;Vividion: Other: Advisory Board;Kyowa Kirin: Other: Advisory Board;Daichii Sankyo Inc: Other: Advisory Board;Purdue Pharma: Other: Advisory Board;Verastem: Other: Advisory Board. Ansell: Bristol Myers Squibb, ADC Therapeutics, Seattle Genetics, Regeneron, Affimed, AI Therapeutics, Pfizer, Trillium and Takeda: Research Funding. Lin: Kite, a Gilead Company: Consultancy, Research Funding;Merck: Research Funding;Gamida Cell: Consultancy;Takeda: Research Funding;Juno: Consultancy;Bluebird Bio: Consultancy, Research Funding;Celgene: Consultancy, Research Funding;Novartis: Consultancy;Janssen: Consultancy, Research Funding;Sorrento: Consultancy;Legend: Consultancy;Vineti: Consultancy. Murthy: CRISPR Therapeutics: Research Funding.

5.
Revista Cubana de Hematologia, Inmunologia y Hemoterapia ; 36(special issue):1-8, 2020.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1089565

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 characterizes itself fundamentally for fever and respiratory symptoms. Acute myeloid leukemia represent close to 80 % of the intense leukemias in adults. A patient with leukemia and infected with the SARS-CoV-2, has increased risk of complications and mortality. The commitment of immunity and the effects of the treatment are variable determining in the defensive answer. Objective: Introducing a patient with acute non lymphocytic leukemia, infected by the COVID-19, yielded condition with very uncommonness. Case: A patient with acute non lymphocytic leukemia reports himself, would refract the treatment, cherished at a hospitable institution to present fever and a perianal abscess, next started with humid cough and whitish expectoration. Accomplishes three for him test fast fort he COVID-19 diagnosis, with negative results, and a PCR-RT positive. The hemorrhage, pulmonary sepsis and the state of shock were the principal complications. The patient perishes after a torpid evolution. Conclusions: The authors accord that coexistence of the COVID-19 and acute non lymphocytic leukemia generated potentially lethal complications during the sick person's clinical evolution, associates to the present inmunosupression. © 2020, Editorial Ciencias Medicas. All rights reserved.

6.
Revista Cubana de Medicina Militar ; 49(3):1-9, 2020.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-884293

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The rapid expansion of COVID-19 caused the World Health Organization, on January 30, 2020, to declare it a health emergency and recognized it as a pandemic on March 11 of the same year. Objective: To describe the clinical evolution of a hypertensive patient, affected by COVID-19. Clinical case: This is a 49-year-old patient, hypertensive, affected by COVID-19, treated at the Dr. “Joaquín Castillo Duany” Military Hospital, who during his stay in the intensive care unit, suffered serious complications such as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome, pneumonia associated with mechanical artificial ventilation, and pulmonary thromboembolism. The delay in going to the hospital, arterial hypertension, and previous treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, were among the variables present in this patient, which possibly had a negative impact on his evolution. Conclusion: With intensive treatment, the ventilatory and anticoagulation strategy used, evolved favorably until his hospital discharge. © 2020, Editorial Ciencias Medicas. All rights reserved.

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