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3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307813

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of our study was to assess the potential role of chest CT for the early detection of COVID-19 pneumonia and to explore its role in patient management in an adult Italian population admitted to the Emergency Department.METHODS: 314 patients presented with clinically suspected COVID-19, From March 3 rd to 23 th 2020, were evaluated with PaO2/FIO2 ratio from arterial blood gas, RT-PCR assay from nasopharyngeal swab sample and chest CT. Patients were classified as COVID-19 negative and COVID-19 positive according to RT-PCR results, considered as a reference. Images were independently evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the RT-PCR results and classified as “CT positive” or “CT negative” for COVID-19, according to CT findings.RESULTS: According to RT-PCR results, 152 patients were COVID-19 negative (48%) and 162 were COVID-19 positive (52%). We found substantial agreement between RT-PCR results and CT findings (p<0.000001), as well as an almost perfect agreement between the two readers. Mixed GGO and consolidation pattern with peripheral and bilateral distribution, multifocal or diffuse abnormalities localized in both upper and lower lung, in association with interlobular septal thickening, bronchial wall thickening and air bronchogram, showed higher frequency in COVID positive patients. We also found a significant correlation between CT findings and patient’s oxygenation status expressed by PaO2/FIO2 ratio.CONCLUSION: Chest CT is a vital component in the early detection and in patients management of COVID-19 pneumonia in a pandemic. It allows to identify suspected patients, cutting off the route of transmission and avoiding further spread of infection.

4.
Biomed Res Int ; 2022: 7768383, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622118

ABSTRACT

Background: The suspension of the surgical activity, the burden of the infection in immunosuppressed patients, and the comorbidities underlying end-stage organ disease have impacted transplant programs significantly, even life-saving procedures, such as liver transplantation. Methods: A review of the literature was conducted to explore the challenges faced by transplant programs and the adopted strategies to overcome them, with a focus on indications for imaging in liver transplant candidates. Results: Liver transplantation relies on an appropriate imaging method for its success. During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, chest CT showed an additional value to detect early signs of SARS-CoV-2 infection and other screening modalities are less accurate than radiology. Conclusion: There is an emerging recognition of the chest CT value to recommend its use and help COVID-19 detection in patients. This examination appears highly sensitive for liver transplant candidates and recipients, who otherwise would have not undergone it, particularly when asymptomatic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Liver Transplantation , Liver/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Contrast Media , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Liver Transplantation/methods , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Tissue Donors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Ultrasonography, Doppler, Color/methods
5.
European heart journal supplements : journal of the European Society of Cardiology ; 23(Suppl G), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1601783

ABSTRACT

Aims Cardiovascular sequelae in COVID-19 survivors remain largely unclear and can potentially go unrecognized. Reports on follow-up focused on cardiovascular evaluation after hospital discharge are currently scarce. Aim of this prospective study was to assess cardiovascular sequelae in previously hospitalized COVID-19 survivors. Methods and results The study was conducted at ‘Sapienza’ University of Rome—Policlinico ‘Umberto I’. After 2 months from discharge, n = 230 COVID-19 survivors underwent a follow-up visit at a dedicated ‘post-COVID Outpatient Clinic’. A cardiovascular evaluation including electrocardiogram (ECG), Troponin and echocardiography was performed. Further tests were requested when clinically indicated. Medical history, symptoms, arterial-blood gas, blood tests, chest computed tomography, and treatment of both in-hospital and follow-up evaluation were recorded. A 1-year telephone follow-up was performed. A total of 36 (16%) COVID-19 survivors showed persistence or delayed onset of cardiovascular disease at 2-months follow-up visit. Persistent condition was recorded in 62% of survivors who experienced an in-hospital cardiovascular disease. Delayed cardiovascular involvement included: myocarditis, pericarditis, ventricular disfunction, new onset of systemic hypertension and arrhythmias. At 1-year telephone follow-up, 105 (45%) survivors reported persistent symptoms, with dyspnoea and fatigue being the most frequent. 60% of survivors showed persistent chest CT abnormalities and among those 28% complained of persistent cardiopulmonary symptoms at long term follow-up. Conclusions Our preliminary data showed persistent or delayed onset of cardiovascular involvement (16%) at short-term follow-up and persistent symptoms (45%) at long-term follow-up. These findings suggest the need for monitoring COVID-19 survivors.

6.
European heart journal supplements : journal of the European Society of Cardiology ; 23(Suppl G), 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1601782

ABSTRACT

Aims A possible interference between ACE-i or ARBs with ACE-2 receptor and SARS-CoV-2 pathway has been raised. Despite data have shown no clinical impact of therapy with ACE-I or ARBs on COVID-19, these drugs are often discontinued upon hospitalization or diagnosis. To evaluate the effects of cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) and prior outpatient therapy with RAAS inhibitors on the chest CT severity score performed within 24 h of diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection (before stopping medications or starting specific therapy for COVID-19) and on 1-year survival. Methods and results This is a multicentre, prospective, observational study. All admitted patients diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection who performed chest CT within 24 h of arrival were consecutively enrolled from 1 March to 1 June 2020. A severity score was attributed to Chest CT by two radiologists in blind to the patient’s clinical information and a cut-off value of 19.5 was considered to define severe radiological pneumonia. A 1-year telephone follow-up was performed in order to evaluate the determinants of 1-year survival. 590 patients with a mean age of 63 ± 14 years were included. Seventy-three (12.4%) patients were treated with ACE-I, 85 (14.4%) with ARBs and 62 (10.5%) with CCB. Cox regression analysis showed that male gender (OR: 1.4;95% CI: from 1.02 to 2.07;P = 0.035), diabetes (OR: 1.6;95% CI: from 1.03 to 2.7;P = 0.037), age (OR: 1.02;95% CI: from 1.008 to 1.033;P = 0.001), and obesity (OR: 3.04;95% CI: from 1.3 to 6.7;P < 0.001) were independently associated with a severe CT score. Of note, while prior outpatient therapy with ACE-I and ARBs was not independently associated with severe CT score, therapy with CCB was independently associated with a severe CT score (OR: 1.9, 95% CI: from 1.05 to 3.4, P = 0.033). Severe chest CT severity score (OR: 1.05;95% CI: from 1.02 to 1.08;P < 0.001), P/F ratio (OR: 0.998;95% CI: from 0.994 to 0.998;P < 0.001), and older age (OR: 1.06;95% CI: from 1.03 to 1.1;P < 0.001) were independently associated with mortality at 1-year follow-up. Neither ACE-I, ARBs, and CCB were associated with mortality at 1 year follow-up. Conclusions ACE-I and ARBs do not influence the chest CT presentation of COVID-19 patients at the time of diagnosis. Furthermore, ACE-I and ARBs do not influence 1-year survival of COVID-19 survivors.

7.
Insights Imaging ; 12(1): 141, 2021 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), it proved necessary to rapidly change medical education from on-site to online teaching. Thus, medical educators were forced to rethink the purpose of teaching and the best form of transmission of knowledge. In cooperation with the European Society of Radiology (ESR), we investigated the attitudes of radiologists in Europe and North America toward innovative online teaching concepts. METHODS: In total, 224 radiologists from 31 different countries participated in our cross-sectional, web-based survey study. On a 7-point Likert scale, participants had to answer 27 questions about the online teaching situation before/during the pandemic, technical and social aspects of online teaching and the future role of online teaching in radiology. RESULTS: An overwhelming majority stated that radiology is particularly well-suited for online teaching (91%), that online teaching should play a more prominent role after the pandemic (73%) and that lecturers should be familiar with online teaching techniques (89%). Difficulties include a higher workload in preparing online courses (59%), issues with motivating students to follow online courses (56%) and the risk of social isolation (71%). Before the pandemic, only 12% of teaching was provided online; for the future, our participants deemed a proportion of approximately 50% online teaching appropriate. CONCLUSION: Our participants are open-minded about online teaching in radiology. As the best way of transferring knowledge in medical education is still unclear, online teaching offers potential for innovation in radiology education. To support online teaching development, a structured, framework-based "online curriculum" should be established.

8.
Radiol Med ; 126(10): 1273-1281, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305169

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to prospectively evaluate the agreement between chest magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) and to assess the diagnostic performance of chest MRI relative to that of CT during the follow-up of patients recovered from coronavirus disease 2019. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty-two patients underwent both follow-up chest CT and MRI scans, evaluated for ground-glass opacities (GGOs), consolidation, interlobular septal thickening, fibrosis, pleural indentation, vessel enlargement, bronchiolar ectasia, and changes compared to prior CT scans. DWI/ADC was evaluated for signal abnormalities suspicious for inflammation. Agreement between CT and MRI was assessed with Cohen's k and weighted k. Measures of diagnostic accuracy of MRI were calculated. RESULTS: The agreement between CT and MRI was almost perfect for consolidation (k = 1.00) and change from prior CT (k = 0.857); substantial for predominant pattern (k = 0.764) and interlobular septal thickening (k = 0.734); and poor for GGOs (k = 0.339), fibrosis (k = 0.224), pleural indentation (k = 0.231), and vessel enlargement (k = 0.339). Meanwhile, the sensitivity of MRI was high for GGOs (1.00), interlobular septal thickening (1.00), and consolidation (1.00) but poor for fibrotic changes (0.18), pleural indentation (0.23), and vessel enlargement (0.50) and the specificity was overall high. DWI was positive in 46.0% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The agreement between MRI and CT was overall good. MRI was very sensitive for GGOs, consolidation and interlobular septal thickening and overall specific for most findings. DWI could be a reputable imaging biomarker of inflammatory activity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/diagnostic imaging , Inflammation/etiology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aged , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/physiopathology , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Cardiol ; 339: 235-242, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) can occur in COVID-19 and has impact on clinical course. Data on CVD prevalence in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and sequelae in survivors is limited. Aim of this prospective study carried out on consecutive unselected COVID-19 population, was to assess: 1) CVD occurrence among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 2) persistence or new onset of CVD at one-month and one-year follow-up. METHODS: Over 30 days n = 152 COVID-19 patients underwent cardiovascular evaluation. Standard electrocardiogram (ECG), Troponin and echocardiography were integrated by further tests when indicated. Medical history, arterial blood gas, blood tests, chest computed tomography and treatment were recorded. CVD was defined as the occurrence of a new condition during the hospitalization for COVID-19. Survivors attended a one-month follow-up visit and a one-year telephone follow-up. RESULTS: Forty-two patients (28%) experienced a wide spectrum of CVD with acute myocarditis being the most frequent. Death occurred in 32 patients (21%) and more frequently in patients who developed CVD (p = 0.032). After adjustment for confounders, CVD was independently associated with death occurrence. At one-month follow-up visit, 7 patients (9%) presented persistent or delayed CVD. At one-year telephone follow-up, 57 patients (48%) reported persistent symptoms. CONCLUSION: Cardiovascular evaluation in COVID-19 patients is crucial since the occurrence of CVD in hospitalized COVID-19 patients is common (28%), requires specific treatment and increases the risk of in-hospital mortality. Persistence or delayed presentation of CVD at 1-month (9%) and persistent symptoms at 1-year follow-up (48%) suggest the need for monitoring COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Cardiovasc Magn Reson ; 23(1): 68, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262508

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early detection of myocardial involvement can be relevant in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients to timely target symptomatic treatment and decrease the occurrence of the cardiac sequelae of the infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in characterizing myocardial damage in active COVID-19 patients, through the correlation between qualitative and quantitative imaging biomarkers with clinical and laboratory evidence of myocardial injury. METHODS: In this retrospective observational cohort study, we enrolled 27 patients with diagnosis of active COVID-19 and suspected cardiac involvement, referred to our institution for CMR between March 2020 and January 2021. Clinical and laboratory characteristics, including high sensitivity troponin T (hs-cTnT), and CMR imaging data were obtained. Relationships between CMR parameters, clinical and laboratory findings were explored. Comparisons were made with age-, sex- and risk factor-matched control group of 27 individuals, including healthy controls and patients without other signs or history of myocardial disease, who underwent CMR examination between January 2020 and January 2021. RESULTS: The median (IQR) time interval between COVID-19 diagnosis and CMR examination was 20 (13.5-31.5) days. Hs-cTnT values were collected within 24 h prior to CMR and resulted abnormally increased in 18 patients (66.6%). A total of 20 cases (74%) presented tissue signal abnormalities, including increased myocardial native T1 (n = 11), myocardial T2 (n = 14) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) (n = 10), late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) (n = 12) or pericardial enhancement (n = 2). A CMR diagnosis of myocarditis was established in 9 (33.3%), pericarditis in 2 (7.4%) and myocardial infarction with non-obstructive coronary arteries in 3 (11.11%) patients. T2 mapping values showed a moderate positive linear correlation with Hs-cTnT (r = 0.58; p = 0.002). A high degree positive linear correlation between ECV and Hs-cTnT was also found (r 0.77; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: CMR allows in vivo recognition and characterization of myocardial damage in a cohort of selected COVID-19 individuals by means of a multiparametric scanning protocol including conventional imaging and T1-T2 mapping sequences. Abnormal T2 mapping was the most commonly abnormality observed in our cohort and positively correlated with hs-cTnT values, reflecting the predominant edematous changes characterizing the active phase of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cardiomyopathies/complications , Cardiomyopathies/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Adult , Age Factors , Cohort Studies , Heart/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors
12.
Radiol Med ; 126(9): 1170-1180, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252205

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate CT and laboratory changes in COVID-19 patients treated with tocilizumab, compared to a control group, throughout a combined semiquantitative and texture analysis of images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From March 11 to April 20, 2020, 57 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients were retrospectively compared: group T (n = 30) receiving tocilizumab and group non-T (n = 27) undergoing only antivirals/antimalarials. Chest-CT and laboratory findings were analyzed before and after treatment. CT evaluation included both semiquantitative scoring and texture analysis of all parenchymal lesions. Survival and recovery analyses were also provided with Kaplan-Meier method. RESULTS: In group T, no significant differences were found for CT score after treatment, while several texture features significantly changed, including mean attenuation (p < 0.0001), skewness (p < 0.0001), entropy (p = 0.0146) and higher-order parameters, suggesting considerable fading of parenchymal lesions. PaO2/FiO2 mean value significantly increased after treatment, from 240 ± 93 to 363 ± 107 (p = 0.0003), with parallel decrease in inflammatory biomarkers (CRP, D-dimer and LDH). In group non-T, CT scoring, texture and laboratory parameters showed significant worsening at follow-up. Findings were clinically associated with opposite trends between two groups, with reduction of severe cases in group T (from 21/30 to 5/30; p < 0.0001) as compared to a significant worsening in group non-T (severe cases increasing from 6/27 to 14/27; p = 0.0473). Probability of discharge was significantly higher in group T (p < 0.0001), as well as survival rate, although not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest the potential role of CT texture analysis for assessing response to treatment in COVID-19 pneumonia, using Tocilizumab, as compared to semiquantitative evaluation, providing insight into the intrinsic parenchymal changes.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
13.
Radiol Med ; 125(10): 931-942, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of our study was to assess the potential role of chest CT in the early detection of COVID-19 pneumonia and to explore its role in patient management in an adult Italian population admitted to the Emergency Department. METHODS: Three hundred and fourteen patients presented with clinically suspected COVID-19, from March 3 to 23, 2020, were evaluated with PaO2/FIO2 ratio from arterial blood gas, RT-PCR assay from nasopharyngeal swab sample and chest CT. Patients were classified as COVID-19 negative and COVID-19 positive according to RT-PCR results, considered as a reference. Images were independently evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the RT-PCR results and classified as "CT positive" or "CT negative" for COVID-19, according to CT findings. RESULTS: According to RT-PCR results, 152 patients were COVID-19 negative (48%) and 162 were COVID-19 positive (52%). We found substantial agreement between RT-PCR results and CT findings (p < 0.000001), as well as an almost perfect agreement between the two readers. Mixed GGO and consolidation pattern with peripheral and bilateral distribution, multifocal or diffuse abnormalities localized in both upper lung and lower lung, in association with interlobular septal thickening, bronchial wall thickening and air bronchogram, showed higher frequency in COVID-positive patients. We also found a significant correlation between CT findings and patient's oxygenation status expressed by PaO2/FIO2 ratio. CONCLUSION: Chest CT has a useful role in the early detection and in patient management of COVID-19 pneumonia in a pandemic. It helps in identifying suspected patients, cutting off the route of transmission and avoiding further spread of infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Mass Chest X-Ray/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Early Diagnosis , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Specimen Handling/methods , Young Adult
14.
Insights Imaging ; 12(1): 28, 2021 Feb 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099894

ABSTRACT

Clinical manifestations of COVID-19 patients are dominated by respiratory symptoms, but cardiac complications are commonly observed and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Underlying pathological mechanisms of cardiac injury are still not entirely elucidated, likely depending on a combination of direct viral damage with an uncontrolled immune activation. Cardiac involvement in these patients ranges from a subtle myocardial injury to cardiogenic shock. Advanced cardiac imaging plays a key role in discriminating the broad spectrum of differential diagnoses. Present article aims to review the value of advanced multimodality imaging in patients with suspected SARS-CoV-2-related cardiovascular involvement and its essential role in risk stratification and tailored treatment strategies. Based on our experience, we also sought to suggest possible diagnostic algorithms for the rationale utilization of advanced imaging tools, such as cardiac CT and CMR, avoiding unnecessary examinations and diagnostic delays.

15.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol ; 44(4): 666-668, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052964
16.
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Imaging ; 22(7): 728-731, 2021 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-978588

ABSTRACT

We proposed a combined cardiothoracic-MRI (CaTh-MRI) protocol for the comprehensive assessment of cardiovascular structures, lung parenchyma, and pulmonary arterial tree, in COVID-19 patients with progressive worsening of clinical conditions and/or suspicion of acute-onset myocardial inflammation. A 25-minutes fast protocol was also conceived for unstable or uncooperative patients by restricting the number of sequences to those necessary to rule out myocardial and to assess pulmonary involvement. In patients requiring CMR characterization of myocardial damage, the addition of lung and thoracic vessel evaluation is of clinical benefit at a minimal time expense.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Pulmonary Artery/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Obes Res Clin Pract ; 15(1): 89-92, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970655

ABSTRACT

We retrospectively investigated, in 62 consecutive hospitalised COVID-19 patients (aged 70 ± 14 years, 40 males), the prognostic value of CT-derived subcutaneous adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) metrics, testing them in four predictive models for admission to intensive care unit (ICU), with and without pre-existing comorbidities. Multivariate logistic regression identified VAT score as the best ICU admission predictor (odds ratios 4.307-12.842). A non-relevant contribution of comorbidities at receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve 0.821 for the CT-based model, 0.834 for the one including comorbidities) highlights the potential one-stop-shop prognostic role of CT-derived lung and adipose tissue metrics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care , Hospitalization , Intensive Care Units , Intra-Abdominal Fat/metabolism , Obesity/metabolism , Subcutaneous Fat/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Area Under Curve , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prognosis , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
19.
G Ital Dermatol Venereol ; 155(5): 632-635, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966334

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the pandemic Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a novel coronavirus named Severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), affecting a high number of patients in Italy, forced a great number of doctors, even dermatologists, to work in the first lines in the dedicated departments. We analyzed the features and the incidence of dermatological issues emerged during the hospitalization due to COVID-19 and absent before. METHODS: All the SARS-CoV-2 positive patients hospitalized in Celio Military Hospital - COVID hub no-intensive care wards from March 16, 2020 until May 4, 2020 were evaluated by dermatologists several times during the hospital stay. RESULTS: Ninety-six patients (15 civilians and 81 Italian servicepeople) were enrolled: 34 (35.4%) patients developed cutaneous manifestations; 15 (16.0%) suffered from skin dryness; 5 (5.2%) irritant contact dermatitis; 4 (4.2%) seborrheic dermatitis; 4 (4.2%) morbilliform rashes; 3 (3.1%) petechial rashes and 3 (3.1%) widespread hives. CONCLUSIONS: A deeper knowledge of cutaneous manifestations in military and civilian hospitalized COVID-19 patients could suggest more effective treatments to win the battle against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hospitals, Military/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Skin Diseases/etiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Dermatitis/etiology , Exanthema/epidemiology , Exanthema/etiology , Female , Humans , Ichthyosis/epidemiology , Ichthyosis/etiology , Inpatients , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Military Personnel , Psoriasis/complications , Skin Diseases/epidemiology , Urticaria/epidemiology , Urticaria/etiology , Young Adult
20.
Eur J Radiol ; 130: 109202, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-684452

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: So far, only a few studies evaluated the correlation between CT features and clinical outcome in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. PURPOSE: To evaluate CT ability in differentiating critically ill patients requiring invasive ventilation from patients with less severe disease. METHODS: We retrospectively collected data from patients admitted to our institution for COVID-19 pneumonia between March 5th-24th. Patients were considered critically ill or non-critically ill, depending on the need for mechanical ventilation. CT images from both groups were analyzed for the assessment of qualitative features and disease extension, using a quantitative semiautomatic method. We evaluated the differences between the two groups for clinical, laboratory and CT data. Analyses were conducted on a per-protocol basis. RESULTS: 189 patients were analyzed. PaO2/FIO2 ratio and oxygen saturation (SaO2) were decreased in critically ill patients. At CT, mixed pattern (ground glass opacities (GGO) and consolidation) and GGO alone were more frequent respectively in critically ill and in non-critically ill patients (p < 0.05). Lung volume involvement was significantly higher in critically ill patients (38.5 % vs. 5.8 %, p < 0.05). A cut-off of 23.0 % of lung involvement showed 96 % sensitivity and 96 % specificity in distinguishing critically ill patients from patients with less severe disease. The fraction of involved lung was related to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, PaO2/FIO2 ratio and SaO2 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Lung disease extension, assessed using quantitative CT, has a significant relationship with clinical severity and may predict the need for invasive ventilation in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Aged , COVID-19 , Critical Illness , Evaluation Studies as Topic , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Research Design , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
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