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1.
J Nutr Sci ; 11: e64, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972473

ABSTRACT

Marketing influences consumers' dietary purchases. However, little is known about marketing environments in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-authorised stores. The present study explored SNAP-authorised store marketing environments in Louisiana by rurality, store ownership and store type (n 42). Sampling methods were designed to include randomly selected stores in each geographic area of the state. The GroPromo was used to measure placement, promotion, and child-focused aspects of marketing strategies used for healthier (fruits and vegetables) and less healthy products (chips, candy, sugar-sweetened beverages, child-focused cereal) in medium- and high-prominence marketing areas. In using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) (P < 0⋅05) for data analysis, variations in GroPromo scores were found among SNAP-authorised stores by rurality (P < 0⋅05) and store ownership (P < 0⋅001); no differences were found by store type (P > 0⋅05). Future research, practice and policy strategies are required to understand the influence of marketing environments on SNAP participants' dietary quality and to design responsive public health interventions.


Subject(s)
Food Assistance , Beverages , Commerce , Food Supply , Humans , Marketing , Poverty
2.
J Equine Vet Sci ; 112: 103895, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1676809

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has increased the availability of virtual horse showing opportunities. The objectives of this study were to describe survey participants' personal characteristics and participation in virtual and in-person horse shows, level of satisfaction, attitude toward technology and motivation to participate, and internal and external factors influencing the decision to participate in virtual horse shows. A survey was distributed to a target audience of adult horse show participants and/or adults supporting youth horse show participants via Qualtrics (n = 251). A majority of respondents (91.2%) reported benefits to participating in virtual horse shows, and 59.8% plan to continue showing virtually when in-person shows resume. The opportunity to show virtually has resulted in 76.1% of respondents anticipating increasing their participation in showing (in-person or virtual). An improvement in attitude toward technology (M =1.6; SD = 0.4; Range = 1.0-2.3) and an increase in motivation to participate, ride and show (M = 1.4; SD = 0.4; Range = 1.0-2.8) was also reported. In addition, respondents indicated they were somewhat likely to be influenced to participate in virtual shows by internal factors such as their budget and ability to record the ride. External factors such as feedback from judges, available divisions, and awards were extremely likely to influence their decision to participate. In conclusion, virtual horse shows have provided a satisfactory outlet to keep people engaged in the industry. Additional research should be done to determine if the current popularity of virtual horse showing persists once in-person shows have fully resumed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Horse Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Horses , Humans , Motivation , Pandemics , Population Groups , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Prev Med Rep ; 24: 101578, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440295

ABSTRACT

Healthy food retail strategies are delivered by Cooperative Extension Services in Louisiana to improve public health among communities with lower income. To guide Cooperative Extension Services Programming, the aim of this study was to assess healthy food access among SNAP-authorized stores. This included comparing the availability, affordability, and quality of healthy foods sold in these stores by geography, ownership, and store type. Seventy-five Louisiana SNAP-authorized stores were selected for measurement. Between October 2019 and March 2020 (prior to the COVID-19 national emergency declaration), trained researchers used the Nutrition Environment Measures Survey in Stores (NEMS-S) to assess the availability, affordability, and quality of healthy versus less healthy foods and beverages in 42 SNAP-authorized stores, including: grocery (n = 12, 29%), convenience (n = 17, 41%), drug (n = 1, 2%), dollar (n = 11, 26%), and butcher/meat (n = 1, 2%). Multivariate analysis of variance (a priori, p < 0.05) determined if differences in total NEMS-S scores or subscores existed by geography (urban versus rural), ownership (corporate/chain versus independent), or store type. No urban/rural differences were identified. Corporate/chain SNAP-authorized stores scored higher on average than independent SNAP-authorized stores for the total NEMS-S score (17.2 versus 8.1; p = 0.009) and availability subscore (13.1 versus 6.1; p = 0.02). SNAP-authorized grocery stores scored higher than all other store types (total NEMS-S score 27.6), followed by SNAP-authorized dollar stores (total NEMS-S score 10.7), and SNAP-authorized convenience stores (total NEMS-S score 5) (p < 0.001). Louisiana Cooperative Extension Services should explore ways to scale healthy food retail strategies statewide with a specific emphasis on independent and smaller SNAP-authorized retailers.

4.
J Equine Vet Sci ; 106: 103734, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1351741

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic affected the economic status of all sectors of the global economy including the horse show industry. Reporting the impact of COVID-19 on in-person horse shows and an early assessment of its impact on the economy was the objective of this study. A Qualtrics survey instrument was disseminated to horse show participants through social media pages and email (n = 251). A majority of respondents were females (95.6%) representing a cross-section of the United States (84.0%). Participants reported planning to attend an average of 9.7 (SD = 7.15) in-person horse shows in 2020 but were unable to attend an average of 4.17 (SD = 3.11) due to COVID-19 restrictions. Participants reported spending a mean of $991 (SD = $648.26) per show on horse show-related expenses, or $9,609 annually. The American Horse Council (2018) reported that 1,227,986 horses comprise the competition sector, with each horse owner showing 1.57 horses.  This participation generates $7.5B in expenses annually. The reduced attendance at in-person shows resulted in a decrease in annual expenditures, suggesting economic losses of $3.23 billion. The quantified direct effects were used in the IMPLAN input-output model to estimate the total economic impact. The reduced attendance resulted in a reduction of $7.2 billion, and a reduction of approximately 50,000 jobs within the horse show industry. Additionally, the industry's contribution to GDP (value added) was reduced by $3.95 billion. Early assessments of the economic impact associated with a reduction of in-person horse showing is vital to understanding the long-term implications for the industry.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Horse Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Female , Health Expenditures , Horses , Industry , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
5.
Current Developments in Nutrition ; 5(Supplement_2):211-211, 2021.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1262089
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