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1.
Hematol Oncol ; 2022 Jul 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1935680

ABSTRACT

The impact of secondary infections (SI) on COVID-19 outcome in patients with hematological malignancies (HM) is scarcely documented. To evaluate incidence, clinical characteristics, and outcome of SI, we analyzed the microbiologically documented SI in a large multicenter cohort of adult HM patients with COVID-19. Among 1741 HM patients with COVID-19, 134 (7.7%) had 185 SI, with a 1-month cumulative incidence of 5%. Median time between COVID-19 diagnosis and SI was 16 days (IQR: 5-36). Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and lymphoma/plasma cell neoplasms (PCN) were more frequent diagnoses in SI patients compared to patients without SI (AML: 14.9% vs 7.1%; lymphoma /PCN 71.7% vs 65.3%). Patients with SI were older (median age 70 vs 66 yrs, p=0.002), with more comorbidities (median Charlson Comorbidity Index 5 vs 4, p<0.001), higher frequency of critical COVID-19 (19.5% vs 11.5%, p=0.046), and more frequently not in complete remission (75% vs 64.7% p=0.024). Blood and bronchoalveolar lavage were the main sites of isolation for SI. Etiology of infections was bacterial in 80% (n=148) of cases, mycotic in 9.7% (n=18) and viral in 10.3% (n=19); polymicrobial infections were observed in 24 patients (18%). Escherichia coli represented most of Gram-negative isolates (18.9%), while coagulase-negative Staphylococci were the most frequent among Gram-positive (14.2%). The 30-days mortality of patients with SI was higher when compared to patients without SI (69% vs 15%, p<0.001). The occurrence of SI worsened COVID-19 outcome in HM patients. Timely diagnosis and adequate management should be considered to improve their prognosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

2.
Virus Evol ; 8(1): veac042, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1915852

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern (VOCs) emerge for their capability to better adapt to the human host aimed and enhance human-to-human transmission. Mutations in spike largely contributed to adaptation. Viral persistence is a prerequisite for intra-host virus evolution, and this likely occurred in immunocompromised patients who allow intra-host long-term viral replication. The underlying mechanism leading to the emergence of variants during viral persistence in the immunocompromised host is still unknown. Here, we show the existence of an ensemble of minor mutants in the early biological samples obtained from an immunocompromised patient and their dynamic interplay with the master mutant during a persistent and productive long-term infection. In particular, after 222 days of active viral replication, the original master mutant, named MB610, was replaced by a minor quasispecies (MB61222) expressing two critical mutations in spike, namely Q493K and N501T. Isolation of the two viruses allowed us to show that MB61222 entry into target cells occurred mainly by the fusion at the plasma membrane (PM), whereas endocytosis characterized the entry mechanism used by MB610. Interestingly, coinfection of two human cell lines of different origin with the SARS-CoV-2 isolates highlighted the early and dramatic predominance of MB61222 over MB610 replication. This finding may be explained by a faster replicative activity of MB61222 as compared to MB610 as well as by the capability of MB61222 to induce peculiar viral RNA-sensing mechanisms leading to an increased production of interferons (IFNs) and, in particular, of IFN-induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1) and IFITM2. Indeed, it has been recently shown that IFITM2 is able to restrict SARS-CoV-2 entry occurring by endocytosis. In this regard, MB61222 may escape the antiviral activity of IFITMs by using the PM fusion pathway for entry into the target cell, whereas MB610 cannot escape this host antiviral response during MB61222 coinfection, since it has endocytosis as the main pathway of entry. Altogether, our data support the evidence of quasispecies fighting for host dominance by taking benefit from the cell machinery to restrict the productive infection of competitors in the viral ensemble. This finding may explain, at least in part, the extraordinary rapid worldwide turnover of VOCs that use the PM fusion pathway to enter into target cells over the original pandemic strain.

4.
Blood Adv ; 2022 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846780

ABSTRACT

Patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma and MYC rearrangement at FISH exhibit poor outcome after R-CHOP. In the last decade, 68 patients with Burkitt lymphoma (BL; n=46) or high-grade B-cell lymphoma (single, double or triple hit; HGBCL; n=22) were treated with a dose-dense, short-term therapy termed "CARMEN regimen", at five Italian Centers. Forty-six (68%) patients were HIV-positive. CARMEN included a 36-day induction with sequsingle weekly doses of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, rituximab, methotrexate, etoposide, and doxorubicin plus intrathecal chemotherapy, followed by high-dose-cytarabine-based consolidation. Patients who did not achieve complete remission (CR) after induction received BEAM-conditioned ASCT after consolidation. Sixty-one (90%) patients completed induction and 59 (87%) completed consolidation. Seventeen patients received ASCT. Grade-4 hematological toxicity was common but did not cause treatment discontinuation; grade-4 non-hematological toxicity was recorded in 11 (16%) patients, with grade-4 infections in 6 (9%). Six (9%) patients died of toxicity (sepsis in four, COVID-19, ARDS). CR rate after the whole treatment was 73% (95%CI=55-91%) for HGBCL patients and 78% (95%CI=66-90%) for BL patients. At a median follow-up of 65 (IQR 40-109) months, 48 patients remain event-free, with a 5-year PFS of 63% (95%CI=58-68%) for HGBCL and 72% (95%CI=71-73%) for BL, with a 5-year OS of 63% (95%CI=58-68%) and 76% (95%CI=75-77%), respectively. HIV seropositivity had not a detrimental effect on outcome. This retrospective study shows that CARMEN is a safe and active regimen both in HIV-negative and -positive patients with MYC-rearranged lymphomas. Encouraging survival figures, attained with a single dose of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide, deserve further investigation in HGBCL and other aggressive lymphomas.

6.
Marchesi, Francesco, Salmanton-Garcia, Jon, Emarah, Ziad, Piukovics, Klára, Nucci, Marcio, Lopez-Garcia, Alberto, Racil, Zdenek, Farina, Francesca, Popova, Marina, Zompi, Sofia, Audisio, Ernesta, Ledoux, Marie-Pierre, Verga, Luisa, Weinbergerova, Barbora, Szotkowski, Tomas, Silva, Maria, Fracchiolla, Nicola Stefano, De Jonge, Nick, Collins, Graham, Marchetti, Monia, Magliano, Gabriele, GarcÍA-Vidal, Carolina, Biernat, Monika, Doesum, Jaap van, Machado, Marina, Demirkan, Fatih, Khabori, Murtadha Al, Zak, Pavel, Visek, Benjamin, Stoma, Igor, MÉNdez, Gustavo-Adolfo, Maertens, Johan, Khanna, Nina, Espigado, Ildefonso, Dragonetti, Giulia, Fianchi, Luana, Principe, Maria Ilaria Del, Cabirta, Alba, Ormazabal-VÉLez, Irati, Jaksic, Ozren, Buquicchio, Caterina, Bonuomo, Valentina, Batinić, Josip, Omrani, Ali, Lamure, Sylvain, Finizio, Olimpia, FernÁNdez, Noemí, Falces-Romero, Iker, Blennow, Ola, Bergantim, Rui, Ali, Natasha, Win, Sein, Praet, Jens V. A. N.; Tisi, Maria Chiara, Shirinova, Ayten, SchÖNlein, Martin, Prattes, Juergen, Piedimonte, Monica, Petzer, Verena, NavrÁTil, Milan, Kulasekararaj, Austin, Jindra, Pavel, Jiří, Glenthøj, Andreas, Fazzi, Rita, de Ramón, Cristina, Cattaneo, Chiara, Calbacho, Maria, Bahr, Nathan, El-Ashwl, Shaimaa Saber, Córdoba, Raúl, Hanakova, Michaela, Zambrotta, Giovanni, Sciumè, Mariarita, Booth, Stephen, Nunes-Rodrigues, Raquel, Sacchi, Maria Vittoria, GarcÍA-PoutÓN, Nicole, MartÍN-GonzÁLez, Juan-Alberto, Khostelidi, Sofya, GrÄFe, Stefanie, Rahimli, Laman, busca, alessandro, Corradini, Paolo, Hoenigl, Martin, Klimko, Nikolai, Koehler, Philipp, Pagliuca, Antonio, Passamonti, Francesco, Cornely, Oliver, pagano, Livio.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328805

ABSTRACT

Patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are at high risk of mortality from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The optimal management of AML patients with COVID-19 has not been established. Our multicenter study included 388 adult AML patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between February 2020 and October 2021. The vast majority were receiving or had received AML treatment in the prior 3 months. COVID-19 was severe in 41.2% and critical in 21.1% of cases. The chemotherapeutic schedule was modified in 174 patients (44.8%), delayed in 68 and permanently discontinued in 106. After a median follow-up of 325 days, 180 patients (46.4%) had died. Death was attributed to COVID-19 (43.3%), AML (26.1%) or to a combination of both (26.7%). Active disease, older age, and treatment discontinuation were associated with death, whereas AML treatment delay was protective. Seventy-nine patients had a simultaneous AML and COVID-19 diagnosis, with an improved survival when AML treatment could be delayed. Patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between January and August 2020 had a significantly lower survival. COVID-19 in AML patients was associated with a high mortality rate and modifications of therapeutic algorithms. The best approach to improve survival was to delay AML treatment.

7.
Blood Adv ; 6(1): 327-338, 2022 01 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622201

ABSTRACT

Lymphoma represents a heterogeneous hematological malignancy (HM), which is characterized by severe immunosuppression. Patients diagnosed of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during the course of HM have been described to have poor outcome, with only few reports specifically addressing lymphoma patients. Here, we investigated the clinical behavior and clinical parameters of a large multicenter cohort of adult patients with different lymphoma subtypes, with the aim of identifying predictors of death. The study included 856 patients, of whom 619 were enrolled prospectively in a 1-year frame and were followed-up for a median of 66 days (range 1-395). Patients were managed as outpatient (not-admitted cohort, n = 388) or required hospitalization (n = 468), and median age was 63 years (range 19-94). Overall, the 30- and 100-days mortality was 13% (95% confidence interval (CI), 11% to 15%) and 23% (95% CI, 20% to 27%), respectively. Antilymphoma treatment, including anti-CD20 containing regimens, did not impact survival. Patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma had the more favorable survival, but this was partly related to significantly younger age. The time interval between lymphoma diagnosis and COVID-19 was inversely related to mortality. Multivariable analysis recognized 4 easy-to-use factors (age, gender, lymphocyte, and platelet count) that were associated with risk of death, both in the admitted and in the not-admitted cohort (HR 3.79 and 8.85 for the intermediate- and high-risk group, respectively). Overall, our study shows that patients should not be deprived of the best available treatment of their underlying disease and indicates which patients are at higher risk of death. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04352556.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphoma , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cohort Studies , Humans , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Lymphoma/therapy , Middle Aged , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
8.
J Hematol Oncol ; 14(1): 168, 2021 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468074

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with hematological malignancies (HM) are at high risk of mortality from SARS-CoV-2 disease 2019 (COVID-19). A better understanding of risk factors for adverse outcomes may improve clinical management in these patients. We therefore studied baseline characteristics of HM patients developing COVID-19 and analyzed predictors of mortality. METHODS: The survey was supported by the Scientific Working Group Infection in Hematology of the European Hematology Association (EHA). Eligible for the analysis were adult patients with HM and laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 observed between March and December 2020. RESULTS: The study sample includes 3801 cases, represented by lymphoproliferative (mainly non-Hodgkin lymphoma n = 1084, myeloma n = 684 and chronic lymphoid leukemia n = 474) and myeloproliferative malignancies (mainly acute myeloid leukemia n = 497 and myelodysplastic syndromes n = 279). Severe/critical COVID-19 was observed in 63.8% of patients (n = 2425). Overall, 2778 (73.1%) of the patients were hospitalized, 689 (18.1%) of whom were admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Overall, 1185 patients (31.2%) died. The primary cause of death was COVID-19 in 688 patients (58.1%), HM in 173 patients (14.6%), and a combination of both COVID-19 and progressing HM in 155 patients (13.1%). Highest mortality was observed in acute myeloid leukemia (199/497, 40%) and myelodysplastic syndromes (118/279, 42.3%). The mortality rate significantly decreased between the first COVID-19 wave (March-May 2020) and the second wave (October-December 2020) (581/1427, 40.7% vs. 439/1773, 24.8%, p value < 0.0001). In the multivariable analysis, age, active malignancy, chronic cardiac disease, liver disease, renal impairment, smoking history, and ICU stay correlated with mortality. Acute myeloid leukemia was a higher mortality risk than lymphoproliferative diseases. CONCLUSIONS: This survey confirms that COVID-19 patients with HM are at high risk of lethal complications. However, improved COVID-19 prevention has reduced mortality despite an increase in the number of reported cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
9.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):4-4, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1339036

ABSTRACT

Introduction. Covid-19 patients (pts) with hematologic malignancies have a severe prognosis with mortality rates around 40%, particularly when on active treatment (Cattaneo et al, Cancer, in press). However, the long-term prognosis and persistence of specific immune responses among those who survive acute infection are unclear.Aim: Pts with hematological diseases were followed longitudinally after the acute phase of COVID-19 according to protocol NP4156 approved by the local EC. Clinical outcome and specific antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 were monitored during convalescence, and correlated to the diagnosis and treatment of the underlying hematological disease.Pts and Methods. Pts affected by multiple myeloma (MM), follicular (FL) and diffuse large B-cell (DLC) lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (CLD), myelodysplastic/chronic myeloproliferative syndromes (MDS/MPN) and surviving the acute phase of virologic-proven COVID-19 were eligible. Immune response parameters were evaluated at +1, +3, +6, +9 and +12 months after nasal swab negativization. Antibodies (Ab) to different conformations of COVID-19 virus proteins, nucleocapsid (N) and spike (S), were measured using a highly sensitive luciferase-immunoprecipitation system (LIPS) assay.Results. Of 51 eligible pts, 41 were tested for SARS-CoV-2 Ab at first timepoint (+1m) (6 pts too early, 2 refusal, 2 lost to follow-up). For 9 of them, Ab levels at +3m were also available. Ab levels of 14 controls without hematologic disorders (Ctrls) also surviving COVID-19 were evaluable at +1m and in 9 of them at +3 months as well. Diagnoses included FL (9) and DLC (6) NHL, CLD (7), MM (10), MDS/MPS (9). The status of hematological disease at the time of COVID-19 diagnosis was as follows: diagnosis (n=4;10%), complete or partial remission (n=16;39%), relapse/refractory (n=6;15%;stable (n=15;36%). Twenty-one pts (51%) were on active treatment, including 6 on chemoimmunotherapy;7 pts had received chemoimmunotherapy previously. Median time from SARS-CoV-2 detection to swab negativity was 30d (range 8-63), and was not influenced by sex, age, hematologic diagnosis, disease status, nor treatment received. Two pts, both affected by DLC secondary to FL, remained swab-positive at day 119+ and 123+.At +1m, both N- and S- seropositivity rate was slightly lower in pts [N+ in 30/41 (73%);S+ in 27/41 (66%)] vs 13/14 for both N+ and S+ in Ctrls (93%) (P=0.16 and 0.08, respectively). Discrepancies between N and S seropositivity were observed in 7 (17%) pts, all with lymphoid disorders. Ab levels were similar in hematologic pts and in Ctrls (N+ 894,707 vs 870,541 LU and S+ 907,591 LU vs 724,120 LU, respectively, P=NS) (Fig.1a). Both seroconversion rates and Ab levels were not influenced by age, sex, status of hematologic disease, ongoing treatment, time to swab negativity, severity of pneumonia and steroid treatment during acute COVID-19. However, a diagnosis of NHL negatively impacted on seroconversion for both N and S. In 15 pts with NHL compared to 26 pts with other hematologic cancers, the N-seropositivity rate was 47% vs 92%, and the S-seropositivity rate was 40% vs 85%y (P=0.002 and 0.0053, respectively). N and S Ab levels were also lower than in other hematologic diseases (515,281 LU vs 1105409 LU, P=.002 and 474,309 LU vs 1,148,303 LU, P=.005 respectively) (Fig.1b). Rituximab (RTX) had been used in 13 of 15 NHL (87%), and treatment was ongoing in 6/13. While N-seroconversion and Ab levels were not influenced, no pts on ongoing RTX had S-seroconversion vs 5/7 pts with past RTX use (P=0.021) and mean antibody levels were 17622 LU vs 668548 LU, respectively (P=0.008).At +3m, no significant variations of both anti-N and anti-S antibody levels had occurred compared to timepoint +1m. Seroconversion status was maintained by 9/9 Ctrls and by 8/8 pts;the only pt with Ab levels below the cut-off at +1m did not show seroconversion at+3m.Conclusions: Overall, hematologic pts surviving COVID-19 have N- and S- antibodies levels and seroconversion rates similar to controls witho t hematologic disorders, although time to swab negativity seems more similar to critically ill pts than in the general population. A diagnosis of NHL negatively impacts on seroconversion and Ab levels, and ongoing RTX seems to have a negative role specifically on anti-S Ab production. Ab response persists at 3 months;the study is ongoing and further data will be available at time of meeting.

10.
Blood ; 136(Supplement 1):47-48, 2020.
Article in English | PMC | ID: covidwho-1339032

ABSTRACT

It has been proposed that patients with hematologic malignancy and autoimmune diseases receiving anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy are particularly at risk of severe Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) because the profound and long-lasting B-cell depletion induced by anti-CD20 mAb may impair virus clearance and may also contribute to reactivation of latent viruses, especially hepatitis B and JC viruses.As of July 20, 2020, the total number of COVID-19 cases reported by the Italian authorities reached 245,000. The north of the country was mostly hit, and Milan and Brescia were among the Italian provinces that registered the highest number of COVID-19 cases. Consistent with this, a high number of COVID-19 patients affected with multiple types of hematological disorders (n. 137) and with multiple sclerosis (MS, n. 114) were referred to ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia. Antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were analyzed in 70 patients with hematological disease, and in few patients with MS. Among these, 10 patients (7 with hematologic disease and 3 with MS) had received treatment with rituximab or ocrelizumab, two anti-CD20 mAbs, within 3 months prior to COVID-19 onset. Clinical indication to CD20-depleting treatment for patients with hematological disorders included Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) or Follicular Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL).Anti-spike protein (anti-S) and anti-nucleocapsid (anti-N) antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 were analyzed during the acute phase of infection and up to 3 months since the onset of symptoms by quantitative measurements of plasma or serum antibodies with luciferase immune precipitation assay systems (LIPS). With this technique, production of anti-S and anti-N antibodies has been demonstrated between day 8 and day 14 after onset of symptoms in immunocompetent individuals, whereas specific antibody production was delayed by few days in immunocompromised patients (Burbelo PD et al, medRxiv. 2020 Apr 24:2020.04.20.20071423).All 10 patients remained seronegative to SARS-CoV-2 for the first 20 days since onset of symptoms. One patient with DLBCL secondary to Follicular NHL had detectable anti-S and anti-N antibodies at day +25, and one patient with MS developed anti-N antibodies by day +23. Two patients, one with DLBCL secondary to Follicular NHL and one with Follicular NHL were still seronegative for both anti-S and anti-N antibodies at 133 and 74 days since onset of symptoms. Two MS patients were seronegative at the last examination, and one other MS patient was anti-S seronegative at day +74.Three of the 10 patients have died;all three were SARS-CoV-2 RT-qPCR+ and seronegative at the time of death.While it has been reported that SARS-CoV-2 is cleared without significant problems by the majority of people with MS or other autoimmune diseases on immunotherapy, these data indicate that treatment with anti-CD20 mAb may significantly alter humoral responses to the virus. Until a vaccine to SARS-CoV-2 is available, the risk-benefit ratio of anti-CD20 mAb therapy in areas with high rates of SARS-CoV-2 infection should be carefully weighed. Moreover, for patients with B-cell malignancies or autoimmune diseases, transient discontinuation of this therapy, or use of alternative therapeutic approaches, should be considered once an efficacious vaccine becomes available.This study was performed according to protocol NP-4000 (Comitato Etico Provinciale), and supported by Regione Lombardia and by the Division of Intramural Research, NIAID.Figure 1

11.
Br J Haematol ; 195(3): 371-377, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314037

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is associated with high mortality in patients with haematological malignancies (HM) and rate of seroconversion is unknown. The ITA-HEMA-COV project (NCT04352556) investigated patterns of seroconversion for SARS-CoV-2 IgG in patients with HMs. A total of 237 patients, SARS-CoV-2 PCR-positive with at least one SARS-CoV-2 IgG test performed during their care, entered the analysis. Among these, 62 (26·2%) had myeloid, 121 (51·1%) lymphoid and 54 (22·8%) plasma cell neoplasms. Overall, 69% of patients (164 of 237) had detectable IgG SARS-CoV-2 serum antibodies. Serologically negative patients (31%, 73 of 237) were evenly distributed across patients with myeloid, lymphoid and plasma cell neoplasms. In the multivariable logistic regression, chemoimmunotherapy [odds ratio (OR), 3·42; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1·04-11·21; P = 0·04] was associated with a lower rate of seroconversion. This effect did not decline after 180 days from treatment withdrawal (OR, 0·35; 95% CI: 0·11-1·13; P = 0·08). This study demonstrates a low rate of seroconversion in HM patients and indicates that treatment-mediated immune dysfunction is the main driver. As a consequence, we expect a low rate of seroconversion after vaccination and thus we suggest testing the efficacy of seroconversion in HM patients.


Subject(s)
Antibody Formation , COVID-19/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/complications , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Hematologic Neoplasms/immunology , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Seroconversion , Young Adult
12.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 10(6): 738-741, 2021 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132547

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 outbreak in the French overseas department Mayotte, 11 children developed multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C). They all had a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms. Six patients were admitted to intensive care unit; management included intravenous immunoglobulin and corticosteroid. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was documented in all patients. The risk of developing MIS-C was much higher than in all of France.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Comoros , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
15.
Acta Biomed ; 91(3): ahead of print, 2020 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-761245

ABSTRACT

Covid-19 infection was a possible causal factor in the exhaustion and decrease number of NK clonal cells, resulting in a evident improvement of signs, symptoms and clinical features related to NK lymphoma refractory to previous immuno-chemiotherapy. It has been shown that SARS-CoV2 binds to ACE2. Covid-19 may infect NK cells to suppress their functions, as NK cells express angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). The excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines in Covid-19 infection may have played a crucial role in lymphodepletion. Although not published in Covid-19, other RNA viruses that cause acute pulmonary infections promote NK cell apoptosis. In NK/T-cell lymphoma plasma EBV-DNA is a sensitive surrogate biomarker of lymphoma load. In this case, we also notice a dramatic transient reduction in plasmatic EBV-DNA viral copies during Covid-19 pneumonia other than NK clonal cells reduction, and after the infection resolution we described a lymphoma relapse as well as EBV-DNA increase and the rising in NK clonal cells count. Although the mechanism leading to spontaneous remission remain uncharacterized, we hypothezised that a favorable adaptive immunity against concurrent viral infection could render an enhanced anti-tumor effect. We suppose COVID-19 infection have induced a transient remission in this patient affected with NK neoplasm.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Killer Cells, Natural/pathology , Lymphoma/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Combined Modality Therapy , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Humans , Lymphoma/diagnosis , Lymphoma/therapy , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
16.
Cancer ; 126(23): 5069-5076, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-754875

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer are considered highly vulnerable to the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, there are still few data on COVID-19 occurring in hematologic patients. METHODS: One hundred two patients with COVID-19 symptoms and a nasopharyngeal swab positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 seen at 2 hematologic departments located in Lombardy, Italy, during March 2020 were studied. Risk factors for acquiring COVID-19 were analyzed by comparisons of patients with COVID-19 and the standard hematologic population managed at the same institutions in 2019. Thirty-day survival was compared with the survival of matched uninfected control patients with similar hematologic disorders and nonhematologic patients affected by COVID-19. RESULTS: Male sex was significantly more prevalent in patients with COVID-19. The infection occurred across all different types of hematologic disease; however, the risk of acquiring a COVID-19 infection was lower for patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia, and higher for patients with immune-mediated anemia on immunosuppressive-related treatments. The 30-day mortality rate was 39.2%, which was higher than the rates for nonhematologic patients with COVID-19 (23.5%; P = .02) and uninfected hematologic controls (3%; P < .001). The severity of the respiratory syndrome at presentation and active hematologic treatment were independently associated with a worse prognosis. Neither diagnosis nor disease status affected the prognosis. The worst prognosis was demonstrated among patients on active hematologic treatment and those with more severe respiratory syndrome at COVID-19 presentation. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, patients should be advised to seek medical attention at the earliest signs of dyspnea and/or respiratory infection. Physicians should perform a risk-benefit analysis to determine the impact of temporarily deferring nonlifesaving treatments versus the risk of adverse outcomes associated with COVID-19. LAY SUMMARY: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection occurs across all different types of hematologic disease; however, the risk of acquiring it is lower for patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia, and higher for patients with immune-mediated anemia on immunosuppressive treatment. The 30-day mortality rate is 39.2%, which is far higher than the rates for both uninfected hematologic controls (3%; P < .001) and nonhematologic patients with COVID-19 (23.5%; P = .02) despite matching for age, sex, comorbidities, and severity of disease. Variables independently associated with a worse prognosis are the severity of the respiratory syndrome at presentation and any type of active hematologic treatment. Neither diagnosis nor disease status influence the prognosis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hematologic Neoplasms/mortality , Hematologic Neoplasms/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/virology , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Rate
17.
Lancet Haematol ; 7(10): e737-e745, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several small studies on patients with COVID-19 and haematological malignancies are available showing a high mortality in this population. The Italian Hematology Alliance on COVID-19 aimed to collect data from adult patients with haematological malignancies who required hospitalisation for COVID-19. METHODS: This multicentre, retrospective, cohort study included adult patients (aged ≥18 years) with diagnosis of a WHO-defined haematological malignancy admitted to 66 Italian hospitals between Feb 25 and May 18, 2020, with laboratory-confirmed and symptomatic COVID-19. Data cutoff for this analysis was June 22, 2020. The primary outcome was mortality and evaluation of potential predictive parameters of mortality. We calculated standardised mortality ratios between observed death in the study cohort and expected death by applying stratum-specific mortality rates of the Italian population with COVID-19 and an Italian cohort of 31 993 patients with haematological malignancies without COVID-19 (data up to March 1, 2019). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify factors associated with overall survival. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04352556, and the prospective part of the study is ongoing. FINDINGS: We enrolled 536 patients with a median follow-up of 20 days (IQR 10-34) at data cutoff, 85 (16%) of whom were managed as outpatients. 440 (98%) of 451 hospitalised patients completed their hospital course (were either discharged alive or died). 198 (37%) of 536 patients died. When compared with the general Italian population with COVID-19, the standardised mortality ratio was 2·04 (95% CI 1·77-2·34) in our whole study cohort and 3·72 (2·86-4·64) in individuals younger than 70 years. When compared with the non-COVID-19 cohort with haematological malignancies, the standardised mortality ratio was 41·3 (38·1-44·9). Older age (hazard ratio 1·03, 95% CI 1·01-1·05); progressive disease status (2·10, 1·41-3·12); diagnosis of acute myeloid leukaemia (3·49, 1·56-7·81), indolent non-Hodgin lymphoma (2·19, 1·07-4·48), aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (2·56, 1·34-4·89), or plasma cell neoplasms (2·48, 1·31-4·69), and severe or critical COVID-19 (4·08, 2·73-6·09) were associated with worse overall survival. INTERPRETATION: This study adds to the evidence that patients with haematological malignancies have worse outcomes than both the general population with COVID-19 and patients with haematological malignancies without COVID-19. The high mortality among patients with haematological malignancies hospitalised with COVID-19 highlights the need for aggressive infection prevention strategies, at least until effective vaccination or treatment strategies are available. FUNDING: Associazione italiana contro le leucemie, linfomi e mieloma-Varese Onlus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hematologic Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hematologic Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Inpatients , Italy/epidemiology , Leukemia/epidemiology , Leukemia/therapy , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/epidemiology , Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Myeloproliferative Disorders/epidemiology , Myeloproliferative Disorders/therapy , Neoplasms, Plasma Cell/epidemiology , Neoplasms, Plasma Cell/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
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