Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
Pediatrics ; 149(4)2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753235

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The family stress model proposes economic hardship results in caregiver distress and relational problems, which negatively impact youth outcomes. We extend this model to evaluate the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic-related family hardships on caregiver and youth stress, and, in turn, youth's psychological well-being. We also investigate how social supports moderate this relationship. METHODS: We used 2 samples of cross-sectional survey data collected between May 2020 and May 2021: children aged 2 to 12 years (n = 977) and adolescents aged 11 to 17 years (n = 669). Variables included pandemic-related family hardships, stress, social support, and youth life satisfaction. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. RESULTS: Experiencing more pandemic-related family hardships was associated with increased caregiver and youth stress (b = 0.04 to 0.21, SE = 0.01-0.02) and, in turn, decreased youth life satisfaction (b = -0.36 to -0.38, SE = 0.04-0.07). Social connectedness (b^ = 0.11-0.17, SE = 0.04) and family engagement (b^ = 0.12-0.18, SE = 0.05-0.06) had direct positive associations with life satisfaction; for children aged 2 to 12 years, greater family engagement was associated with decreased effect of child stress on life satisfaction (b^ = 0.15, SE = 0.05). For adolescents, females had higher levels of stress compared with males (b^ = 0.40, SE = 0.6), and having anxiety and/or depression was associated with decreased life satisfaction (b^ = -0.24, SE = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers and youth who experienced more coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic hardships had higher levels of stress, particularly adolescent females. Although stress negatively impacted life satisfaction across all ages, family engagement was a protective factor for children aged 2 to 12 years, whereas having anxiety and/or depression was a risk factor for adolescents. For all youth, however, being more socially connected and engaged with family promoted life satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(2): e24893, 2021 02 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Suboptimal adherence to 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) is prevalent in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and associated with increased risk of relapse. Rapid uptake of personal technology makes mobile health (mHealth) an attractive platform to promote adherence. OBJECTIVE: Study objectives were to examine access to mobile technology and preferences for an mHealth intervention to improve medication adherence in pediatric ALL. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was administered in oncology clinic to parents of children with ALL as well as adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with ALL receiving maintenance chemotherapy. RESULTS: A total of 49 parents (median age [IQR] 39 [33-42] years; female 76% [37/49]) and 15 patients (median age [IQR] 17 [16-19]; male 80% [12/15]) participated. All parents and AYAs owned electronic tablets, smartphones, or both. Parents' most endorsed mHealth app features included a list of medications (71%, 35/49), information about 6-MP (71%, 35/49), refill reminders (71%, 35/49), and reminders to take 6-MP (71%, 35/49). AYAs' most endorsed features included refill reminders (73%, 11/15), reminders to take 6-MP (73%, 11/15), and tracking 6-MP (73%, 11/15). CONCLUSIONS: Parents and AYAs reported ubiquitous access to mobile technology and strong interest in multiple adherence-specific mHealth app features. Parents and AYAs provided valuable insight into preferred features for a multifunctional behavioral intervention (mHealth app) to promote medication adherence in pediatric ALL.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy/methods , Medication Adherence/statistics & numerical data , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/therapy , Technology/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Smartphone , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 113(11): 1495-1505, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246732

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Fear of recurrence (FoR) is a prevalent concern among breast cancer survivors (BCS), yet few accessible interventions exist. This study evaluated a targeted eHealth intervention, "FoRtitude," to reduce FoR using cognitive behavioral skills training and telecoaching. METHODS: BCS (N = 196) were recruited from an academic medical center and 3 National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Program community sites, had stage 0-III breast cancer, were 1-10 years postprimary treatment, with moderate to high FoR and familiarity with the internet. Using the Multiphase Optimization Strategy, participants were independently randomly assigned to 3 cognitive behavioral skills (relaxation, cognitive restructuring, worry practice) vs an attention control condition (health management content [HMC]) and to telecoaching (motivational interviewing) vs no telecoaching. Website content was released across 4 weeks and included didactic lessons, interactive tools, and a text-messaging feature. BCS completed the Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory at baseline and at 4 and 8 weeks. Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory scores over time were compared using mixed-effects models. All statistical tests were 2-sided. RESULTS: FCRI scores [SD] decreased statistically significantly from baseline to postintervention (T0 = 53.1 [17.4], T2 = 41.9 [16.2], P < .001). The magnitude of reduction in FCRI scores was comparable across cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and attention control HMC conditions and was predicted by increased self-efficacy. Telecoaching was associated with lower attrition and greater website use (mean adherence score [SD] = 26.6 [7.2] vs 21.0 [10.5], P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: BCS experienced statistically significant reductions in FoR postintervention, but improvements were comparable between CBT and attention controls. Telecoaching improved adherence and retention. Future research is needed on optimal integration of CBT and HMC, dose, and features of eHealth delivery that contributed to reducing FoR. In the COVID-19 era, remote delivery has become even more essential for reaching survivors struggling with FoR.


Subject(s)
Breast Neoplasms/therapy , Cancer Survivors/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Fear/psychology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Breast Neoplasms/psychology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Quality of Life
4.
J Psychosoc Oncol ; 39(3): 452-460, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165097

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer are ideally screened for symptoms, including distress, using patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). This initiative was developed to ensure patients without access to an electronic portal were screened for distress and related symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic. Prior to the pandemic, these patients could complete screening in clinic. However, many visits transitioned to telehealth. We implemented a standardized telephone outreach process targeting patients without active electronic portal accounts to improve remote symptom monitoring. Outreach resulted in 172 completed screens, identifying 110 needs for 63 individuals. Twenty-eight patients completed patient portal enrollment. Outreach calls captured a higher percentage of Black patients (34%) and a higher percentage of 61-80 year olds (69%) compared to portal users. Telephone outreach during the pandemic captured data that otherwise would have been missed in elderly and minority patients without electronic patient portal access. Patient engagement is vital to the distress screening process.


Subject(s)
Behavioral Symptoms/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Needs Assessment , Neoplasms/psychology , Patient Reported Outcome Measures , Psychological Distress , Telemedicine , Telephone , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
5.
Cancer ; 127(14): 2545-2552, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1162537

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Early discontinuation is a substantial barrier to the delivery of endocrine therapies (ETs) and may influence recurrence and survival. The authors investigated the association between early discontinuation of ET and social determinants of health, including insurance coverage and the neighborhood deprivation index (NDI), which was measured on the basis of patients' zip codes, in breast cancer. METHODS: In this retrospective analysis of a prospective randomized clinical trial (Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment), women with hormone receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative breast cancer who started ET within a year of study entry were included. Early discontinuation was calculated as stopping ET within 4 years of its start for reasons other than distant recurrence or death via Kaplan-Meier estimates. A Cox proportional hazards joint model was used to analyze the association between early discontinuation of ET and factors such as the study-entry insurance and NDI, with adjustments made for other variables. RESULTS: Of the included 9475 women (mean age, 55.6 years; White race, 84%), 58.0% had private insurance, whereas 11.7% had Medicare, 5.8% had Medicaid, 3.8% were self-pay, and 19.1% were treated at international sites. The early discontinuation rate was 12.3%. Compared with those with private insurance, patients with Medicaid (hazard ratio [HR], 1.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.23-1.92) and self-pay patients (HR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.25-2.17) had higher early discontinuation. Participants with a first-quartile NDI (highest deprivation) had a higher probability of discontinuation than those with a fourth-quartile NDI (lowest deprivation; HR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.11-1.62). CONCLUSIONS: Patients' insurance and zip code at study entry play roles in adherence to ET, with uninsured and underinsured patients having a high rate of treatment nonadherence. Early identification of patients at risk may improve adherence to therapy. LAY SUMMARY: In this retrospective analysis of 9475 women with breast cancer participating in a clinical trial (Trial Assigning Individualized Options for Treatment), Medicaid and self-pay patients (compared with those with private insurance) and those in the highest quartile of neighborhood deprivation scores (compared with those in the lowest quartile) had a higher probability of early discontinuation of endocrine therapy. These social determinants of health assume larger importance with the expected increase in unemployment rates and loss of insurance coverage in the aftermath of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Early identification of patients at risk and enrollment in insurance optimization programs may improve the persistence of therapy.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal/therapeutic use , Breast Neoplasms/drug therapy , Insurance Coverage/classification , Insurance Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Treatment Adherence and Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Female , Humans , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Residence Characteristics , Retrospective Studies , United States
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL