Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(6): e2218362, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898507

ABSTRACT

Importance: Latinx individuals in the United States have lower COVID-19 vaccination rates and higher rates of COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations, and deaths than non-Latinx White individuals. Little is known about the perspectives of Latinx adults who had not received the COVID-19 vaccination and were hospitalized for COVID-19. Objective: To describe the perspectives of Latinx individuals who were unvaccinated and subsequently hospitalized for COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This qualitative study was conducted using semistructured phone interviews with 25 Latinx adults who were unvaccinated and survived a COVID-19 hospitalization in a public safety net hospital in Colorado from February to November 2021. Interviews were audio recorded, and transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Themes and subthemes of perspectives on vaccination. Results: Among 25 adults (14 [56.0%] women, 11 [44.0%] men; mean [SD] age, 51 [15] years) who participated, all participants self-identified as Latino, Latina, or Latinx or Hispanic. There were 11 individuals who relied on emergency Medicaid (hospital coverage for Denver residents who are undocumented), while 10 individuals (40.0%) were essential workers and 13 individuals (52.0%) were unemployed. In interviews, 3 themes (with subthemes) were identified: factors associated with vaccination after hospitalization (subthemes: fear of death, avoiding hospitalization and reinfection, convinced COVID-19 is real, and responded to pressure from others), concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine (subthemes: experimental status and short timeline for production, contents of vaccine unknown or concerning, vaccine considered ineffective, worrisome immediate and long-term adverse effects, mixed and conflicting information, and government aimed to control or mark population through vaccination), and opportunities to improve vaccine uptake (subthemes; sharing personal experiences through social media, testimonials about minimal vaccine adverse effects, connecting with friends and family about the hospitalization experience, making the vaccine more accessible, and connecting with trusted sources of information). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that Latinx individuals who were unvaccinated and subsequently hospitalized for COVID-19 were motivated to engage in advocacy to encourage vaccination in their communities. These findings suggest that supporting patient advocacy after hospital discharge and continued efforts to create low-barrier, patient-informed public health strategies may be associated with increased vaccine uptake in Latinx communities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Phobic Disorders , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
2.
J Ment Health ; 31(4): 524-533, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604963

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has seen a global surge in anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and stress. AIMS: This study aimed to describe the perspectives of patients with COVID-19, their family, health professionals, and the general public on the impact of COVID-19 on mental health. METHODS: A secondary thematic analysis was conducted using data from the COVID-19 COS project. We extracted data on the perceived causes and impact of COVID-19 on mental health from an international survey and seven online consensus workshops. RESULTS: We identified four themes (with subthemes in parenthesis): anxiety amidst uncertainty (always on high alert, ebb and flow of recovery); anguish of a threatened future (intense frustration of a changed normality, facing loss of livelihood, trauma of ventilation, a troubling prognosis, confronting death); bearing responsibility for transmission (fear of spreading COVID-19 in public; overwhelming guilt of infecting a loved one); and suffering in isolation (severe solitude of quarantine, sick and alone, separation exacerbating grief). CONCLUSION: We found that the unpredictability of COVID-19, the fear of long-term health consequences, burden of guilt, and suffering in isolation profoundly impacted mental health. Clinical and public health interventions are needed to manage the psychological consequences arising from this pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/psychology , Family , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2
4.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(9): e2127632, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441919
5.
JAMA Health Forum ; 2(9):1-3, 2021.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1396803
6.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e048712, 2021 05 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216805

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the drivers of distress and motivations faced by interdisciplinary clinicians who were on the frontline caring for patients with COVID-19. DESIGN: 50 semistructured interviews. Transcripts were analysed using qualitative thematic analysis. SETTING: A safety-net hospital in Denver, Colorado. PARTICIPANTS: Interdisciplinary frontline clinicians including physicians, advance practice providers, nurses, respiratory therapists and paramedics providing inpatient hospital care to patients hospitalised for COVID-19. RESULTS: Fifty clinicians (32 women and 18 men) participated. Five themes with respective subthemes (in parentheses) were identified: depersonalisation and barriers to care (impeding rapport and compassion, focusing on infection risk at the expense of high-quality care, grief from witnessing patients suffer in isolation), powerless in uncertainty (inescapable awareness of personal risk, therapeutic doubt in a void of evidence, confronting ethical dilemmas, struggling with dynamic and unfamiliar challenges), overwhelmed and exhausted (burden of personal protective equipment (PPE), information overload and confusion, overstretched by additional responsibilities at work, compounded by personal life stressors, feeling vulnerable and dispensable, compassion fatigue, distress from the disproportionate impact on socially oppressed communities), bolstering morale and confidence (motivated by community and family support, equipped with data), and driven by moral duty (responsibility to patient care and community, collegial solidarity and collaboration, contributing to the greater good). CONCLUSION: Frontline clinicians reported distress due to the challenges of PPE, uncertainty and powerlessness, new responsibilities at work and home, losing control of their schedules, grief from witnessing patients suffer in isolation and witnessing healthcare disparities exacerbated by this pandemic. Clinicians feel supported by their colleagues, families, and community and were driven by a sense of moral duty. Healthcare system should adopt strategies to minimise distress faced by interdisciplinary clinicians on the frontline of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorado , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2
7.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e210684, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1126326

ABSTRACT

Importance: Latinx individuals, particularly immigrants, are at higher risk than non-Latinx White individuals of contracting and dying from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Little is known about Latinx experiences with COVID-19 infection and treatment. Objective: To describe the experiences of Latinx individuals who were hospitalized with and survived COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: The qualitative study used semistructured phone interviews of 60 Latinx adults who survived a COVID-19 hospitalization in public hospitals in San Francisco, California, and Denver, Colorado, from March 2020 to July 2020. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. Data analysis was conducted from May 2020 to September 2020. Main Outcomes and Measures: Themes and subthemes that reflected patient experiences. Results: Sixty people (24 women and 36 men; mean [SD] age, 48 [12] years) participated. All lived in low-income areas, 47 participants (78%) had more than 4 people in the home, and most (44 participants [73%]) were essential workers. Four participants (9%) could work from home, 12 (20%) had paid sick leave, and 21 (35%) lost their job because of COVID-19. We identified 5 themes (and subthemes) with public health and clinical care implications: COVID-19 was a distant and secondary threat (invincibility, misinformation and disbelief, ingrained social norms); COVID-19 was a compounder of disadvantage (fear of unemployment and eviction, lack of safeguards for undocumented immigrants, inability to protect self from COVID-19, and high-density housing); reluctance to seek medical care (worry about health care costs, concerned about ability to access care if uninsured or undocumented, undocumented immigrants fear deportation); health care system interactions (social isolation and change in hospital procedures, appreciation for clinicians and language access, and discharge with insufficient resources or clinical information); and faith and community resiliency (spirituality, Latinx COVID-19 advocates). Conclusions and Relevance: In interviews, Latinx patients with COVID-19 who survived hospitalization described initial disease misinformation and economic and immigration fears as having driven exposure and delays in presentation. To confront COVID-19 as a compounder of social disadvantage, public health authorities should mitigate COVID-19-related misinformation, immigration fears, and challenges to health care access, as well as create policies that provide work protection and address economic disadvantages.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , Emigration and Immigration , Employment , Fear , Help-Seeking Behavior , Hospitalization , Public Health , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , California , Colorado , Communication , Deportation , Economic Status , Female , Financial Stress , Health Expenditures , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Poverty Areas , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Social Class , Social Norms , Teleworking , Undocumented Immigrants
8.
Crit Care Med ; 49(3): 503-516, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1010657

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Respiratory failure, multiple organ failure, shortness of breath, recovery, and mortality have been identified as critically important core outcomes by more than 9300 patients, health professionals, and the public from 111 countries in the global coronavirus disease 2019 core outcome set initiative. The aim of this project was to establish the core outcome measures for these domains for trials in coronavirus disease 2019. DESIGN: Three online consensus workshops were convened to establish outcome measures for the four core domains of respiratory failure, multiple organ failure, shortness of breath, and recovery. SETTING: International. PATIENTS: About 130 participants (patients, public, and health professionals) from 17 countries attended the three workshops. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Respiratory failure, assessed by the need for respiratory support based on the World Health Organization Clinical Progression Scale, was considered pragmatic, objective, and with broad applicability to various clinical scenarios. The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment was recommended for multiple organ failure, because it was routinely used in trials and clinical care, well validated, and feasible. The Modified Medical Research Council measure for shortness of breath, with minor adaptations (recall period of 24 hr to capture daily fluctuations and inclusion of activities to ensure relevance and to capture the extreme severity of shortness of breath in people with coronavirus disease 2019), was regarded as fit for purpose for this indication. The recovery measure was developed de novo and defined as the absence of symptoms, resumption of usual daily activities, and return to the previous state of health prior to the illness, using a 5-point Likert scale, and was endorsed. CONCLUSIONS: The coronavirus disease 2019 core outcome set recommended core outcome measures have content validity and are considered the most feasible and acceptable among existing measures. Implementation of the core outcome measures in trials in coronavirus disease 2019 will ensure consistency and relevance of the evidence to inform decision-making and care of patients with coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Research Design , Dyspnea , Humans , Multiple Organ Failure , Recovery of Function , Reproducibility of Results , Respiratory Insufficiency
9.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(48): 1812-1816, 2020 Dec 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000678

ABSTRACT

Persons identifying as Hispanic or Latino (Hispanic) represent the second largest racial/ethnic group in the United States (1), yet understanding of the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in this population is limited. To evaluate COVID-19 health disparities in the community and inform public health, health system, and community-based interventions, local public health authorities analyzed the sociodemographic characteristics of persons who were diagnosed, hospitalized, and who died with COVID-19 in Denver, Colorado. During the first 7 months of the COVID-19 epidemic in Denver (March 6-October 6, 2020) the majority of adult COVID-19 cases (54.8%), hospitalizations (62.1%), and deaths (51.2%) were among persons identifying as Hispanic, more than double the proportion of Hispanic adults in the Denver community (24.9%) (1). Systemic drivers that influence how Hispanic persons live and work increase their exposure risks: compared with non-Hispanic persons, Hispanic persons with COVID-19 in Denver reported larger household sizes and were more likely to report known exposures to household and close contacts with COVID-19, working in an essential industry, and working while ill. Reducing the disproportionate incidence of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality among Hispanic persons will require implementation of strategies that address upstream social and environmental factors that contribute to an increased risk for both infection and transmission and that facilitate improved access to culturally congruent care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/ethnology , COVID-19/mortality , Health Status Disparities , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Colorado/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
10.
Crit Care Med ; 48(11): 1622-1635, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720988

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The outcomes reported in trials in coronavirus disease 2019 are extremely heterogeneous and of uncertain patient relevance, limiting their applicability for clinical decision-making. The aim of this workshop was to establish a core outcomes set for trials in people with suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease 2019. DESIGN: Four international online multistakeholder consensus workshops were convened to discuss proposed core outcomes for trials in people with suspected or confirmed coronavirus disease 2019, informed by a survey involving 9,289 respondents from 111 countries. The transcripts were analyzed thematically. The workshop recommendations were used to finalize the core outcomes set. SETTING: International. SUBJECTS: Adults 18 years old and over with confirmed or suspected coronavirus disease 2019, their family members, members of the general public and health professionals (including clinicians, policy makers, regulators, funders, researchers). INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS: None. MAIN RESULTS: Six themes were identified. "Responding to the critical and acute health crisis" reflected the immediate focus on saving lives and preventing life-threatening complications that underpinned the high prioritization of mortality, respiratory failure, and multiple organ failure. "Capturing different settings of care" highlighted the need to minimize the burden on hospitals and to acknowledge outcomes in community settings. "Encompassing the full trajectory and severity of disease" was addressing longer term impacts and the full spectrum of illness (e.g. shortness of breath and recovery). "Distinguishing overlap, correlation and collinearity" meant recognizing that symptoms such as shortness of breath had distinct value and minimizing overlap (e.g. lung function and pneumonia were on the continuum toward respiratory failure). "Recognizing adverse events" refers to the potential harms of new and evolving interventions. "Being cognizant of family and psychosocial wellbeing" reflected the pervasive impacts of coronavirus disease 2019. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality, respiratory failure, multiple organ failure, shortness of breath, and recovery are critically important outcomes to be consistently reported in coronavirus disease 2019 trials.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Outcome Assessment, Health Care/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment
11.
Crit Care Med ; 48(11): 1612-1621, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720987

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There are over 4,000 trials conducted in people with coronavirus disease 2019. However, the variability of outcomes and the omission of patient-centered outcomes may diminish the impact of these trials on decision-making. The aim of this study was to generate a consensus-based, prioritized list of outcomes for coronavirus disease 2019 trials. DESIGN: In an online survey conducted in English, Chinese, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish languages, adults with coronavirus disease 2019, their family members, health professionals, and the general public rated the importance of outcomes using a 9-point Likert scale (7-9, critical importance) and completed a Best-Worst Scale to estimate relative importance. Participant comments were analyzed thematically. SETTING: International. SUBJECTS: Adults 18 years old and over with confirmed or suspected coronavirus disease 2019, their family members, members of the general public, and health professionals (including clinicians, policy makers, regulators, funders, and researchers). INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS: None. MAIN RESULTS: In total, 9,289 participants from 111 countries (776 people with coronavirus disease 2019 or family members, 4,882 health professionals, and 3,631 members of the public) completed the survey. The four outcomes of highest priority for all three groups were: mortality, respiratory failure, pneumonia, and organ failure. Lung function, lung scarring, sepsis, shortness of breath, and oxygen level in the blood were common to the top 10 outcomes across all three groups (mean > 7.5, median ≥ 8, and > 70% of respondents rated the outcome as critically important). Patients/family members rated fatigue, anxiety, chest pain, muscle pain, gastrointestinal problems, and cardiovascular disease higher than health professionals. Four themes underpinned prioritization: fear of life-threatening, debilitating, and permanent consequences; addressing knowledge gaps; enabling preparedness and planning; and tolerable or infrequent outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Life-threatening respiratory and other organ outcomes were consistently highly prioritized by all stakeholder groups. Patients/family members gave higher priority to many patient-reported outcomes compared with health professionals.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Health Priorities/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic/standards , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Research Design , SARS-CoV-2 , Symptom Assessment
12.
Adv Chronic Kidney Dis ; 27(5): 427-433, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-612324

ABSTRACT

Racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, age, and sex-related health disparities in kidney disease are prominent in the United States. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has disproportionately affected marginalized populations. Older adults, people experiencing unstable housing, racial and ethnic minorities, and immigrants are potentially at increased risk for infection and severe complications from COVID-19. The direct and societal effects of the pandemic may increase risk of incident kidney disease and lead to worse outcomes for those with kidney disease. The rapid transition to telemedicine potentially limits access to care for older adults, immigrants, and people experiencing unstable housing. The economic impact of the pandemic has had a disproportionate effect on women, minorities, and immigrants, which may limit their ability to manage kidney disease and lead to complications or kidney disease progression. We describe the impact of COVID-19 on marginalized populations and highlight how the pandemic may exacerbate existing disparities in kidney disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Economic Status/statistics & numerical data , Emigrants and Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , Health Status Disparities , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Homeless Persons/statistics & numerical data , Kidney Diseases/epidemiology , Age Factors , COVID-19/ethnology , Health Equity , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Humans , Kidney Diseases/ethnology , Refugees/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Social Class , Undocumented Immigrants/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL