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11th International Conference on the Internet of Things, IoT 2021 ; : 211-214, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1784893

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis raised public health attention closer to our global society's demands. The disease proliferation occurs typically by droplet transmission, by being close to an infected person. Social distancing, a natural solution, is not always applicable to everyday needs, such as in the public transportation system, which is a space highly susceptible to viral proliferation. A set of ways to reduce proliferation in these infrastructures is by reinforcing facial masks usage, restraining symptomatic users, and reducing physical contact with public devices. Safe Gate, an Internet of Things (IoT) solution to enforce containment measures for disease proliferation, is proposed in this paper. This IoT solution is based on a network of edge computing devices used to control access to the entrance gate of the stations. The edge devices service samples an user's temperature and facial image to verify that body temperature is within normal bounds and the user is correctly wearing a face mask. The system is contact-free and does not require an active operator, with no personal data stored, preserving privacy. Additionally, it minimizes personnel involvement with passengers, ensuring staff protection. The research question is whether the solution with two levels of facial recognition using cognitive edge computing will meet the requirements of a real system. In addition to this question, a queuing model to verify the feasibility of the solution is presented and evaluates the operational impact on a real transportation system. © 2021 ACM.

2.
Brazilian Journalism Research ; 17(3):536-561, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1675558

ABSTRACT

The recent rise of right-wing populism has given new momentum to the discussion about the meaning of populism around the world and the covid-19 pandemic added yet another layer to the issue. Considering the growing circulation of the term "populism" in public discourse, as well as the volatility of its meaning, this paper seeks to identify the different constructions of meaning around this phenomenon by Brazilian media during the covid-19 pandemic. Through quantitative and qualitative analysis, in which we used the perspective of media framings, we examine 170 articles from 17 Brazilian media outlets published between March 1st and October 1st, 2020. The results allow us to conclude that there are circumstantial meanings of populism that were incorporated during the pandemic, especially related to an antiscientific approach. © 2021 Associacao Brasileira de Pesquisadores de Jornalismo. All rights reserved.

3.
Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 7(SUPPL 1):S303-S304, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1185836

ABSTRACT

Background: The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on people living with HIV (PWH) are unknown. Beyond SARS-CoV-2 co-infection, the pandemic may have devastating consequences for HIV care delivery. Understanding these is crucial as reduced antiretroviral therapy (ART) availability alone could lead to ≥500,000 AIDS-related deaths in 2020-2021. With Latin America now a focal point in the pandemic, we sought to describe the impact of COVID-19 on HIV care at Latin American clinical sites. Methods: Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet) and additional Brazilian HIV care sites in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru were included. An electronic survey of COVID-19 effects on HIV clinic operations was administered in Spanish or English via phone and email, April 28-June 2, 2020. We also compared national COVID-19 case, mortality, and policy data from public sources. Results: Brazil's and Mexico's epidemics appear most pronounced, with >10,000 confirmed COVID-19-related deaths (Figure 1);countries implemented “social distancing” policies at different times after initial cases, with Haiti earliest and Mexico latest (Figure 2). Nearly all 13 sites reported decreased hours and providers for HIV care. Twelve of 13 reported increased use of telehealth, suspension/postponements of routine HIV appointments, and/or suspension of HIV research. Eleven of 13 reported initiation of new COVID-19 research but suspension of community HIV testing, and nearly half provided additional ART supplies. Nearly 70% reported impacts on HIV viral load testing and nearly 40% reported personal protective equipment stock-outs (Table). All 13 sites experienced changes in resources/services in tandem with national policies;there was wide variation, however, in the number of economic and health supports implemented thus far (e.g., quarantines, tax deferrals, interest rate reductions, etc.), from 172 COVID-19-related policies in Brazil to only 30 in Mexico Conclusion: The COVID-19 pandemic has already had a substantial effect on daily operations of HIV clinics in Latin America. The downstream effects of these impacts on HIV outcomes in Latin America will need to be further studied. (Table Presented).

4.
Neurol Sci ; 42(2): 479-489, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012221

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical, neurological, neuroimaging, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings associated with encephalopathy in patients admitted to a COVID-19 tertiary reference center. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed records of consecutive patients with COVID-19 evaluated by a consulting neurology team from March 30, 2020 through May 15, 2020. RESULTS: Fifty-five patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 were included, 43 of whom showed encephalopathy, and were further divided into mild, moderate, and severe encephalopathy groups. Nineteen patients (44%) had undergone mechanical ventilation and received intravenous sedatives. Eleven (26%) patients were on dialysis. Laboratory markers of COVID-19 severity were very common in encephalopathy patients, but did not correlate with the severity of encephalopathy. Thirty-nine patients underwent neuroimaging studies, which showed mostly non-specific changes. One patient showed lesions possibly related to CNS demyelination. Four had suffered an acute stroke. SARS-CoV-2 was detected by RT-PCR in only one of 21 CSF samples. Two CSF samples showed elevated white blood cell count and all were negative for oligoclonal bands. In our case series, the severity of encephalopathy correlated with higher probability of death during hospitalization (OR = 5.5 for each increment in the degree of encephalopathy, from absent (0) to mild (1), moderate (2), or severe (3), p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: In our consecutive series with 43 encephalopathy cases, neuroimaging and CSF analysis did not support the role of direct viral CNS invasion or CNS inflammation as the cause of encephalopathy.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Brain Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Brain Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Tertiary Care Centers
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