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1.
Innovation in Aging ; 5:9-9, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2012048
2.
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry ; 56(SUPPL 1):207, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1916594

ABSTRACT

Background: The Statewide Burns Unit (SWBU) at Royal North Shore Hospital, one of two burns units in NSW, is a 12-bed unit run under the plastics/burns surgical team, nurse unit manager and multidisciplinary allied health team. Consultation-liaison (CL) psychiatry provides a part-time CL psychiatry registrar supervised by a parttime CL psychiatrist, who see and assess all admissions for pre-morbid and/or new and emerging acute mental health (MH) issues. Over 2019-2021 the SWBU saw significant numbers of burn injury patients because of several natural disasters and a spike in self-immolation during Sydney's COVID-19 lockdowns. The traumatic nature of the injuries was challenging for staff to manage over such a prolonged period. Senior team members were aware of the urgent need to (1) increase support for staff to minimise burnout risk and (2) improve access to longer-term psychological treatments for patients after discharge. Objectives: To report on the MH issues managed during this time, the management challenges and the process of significant service development, aiming to address unmet patient need as well as staffing, burnout and vicarious trauma. Methods: Naturalistic file review and NSW Statewide Burns registrar review supplemented by data from interviews with SWBU multidisciplinary team staff members. Conclusion: Trauma-informed and relational care is at the heart of the SWBU multidisciplinary team approach to care, requiring high-level service support and funding. CL psychiatry services can have a significant role in promoting service development, which sits under CanMEDS hats of clinical expert, advocate and leader.

3.
Journal of Mens Health ; 18(4):8, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1887430

ABSTRACT

Background: The elbow plank is a common exercise that can easily be done at home, but its effects on physical fitness and immunocyte function in elderly people are unknown. This prior study was conducted to analyze the changes in health-related physical fitness and immunocytes in an elderly male subject after performing elbow plank exercises. Methods: The participant was a 61-year-old man who had no experience in performing the elbow plank. Elbow plank exercises were performed for 30 min a day, 5 days a week, for 4 weeks. The intensity of was checked daily with ratings of perceived exertion (RPE). His goal was to reach an RPE between 12 and 14, at which a 1 min rest was given before repeating the process with a progressively higher RPE every 10 min. Results: Compared with pre-values, (1) health related physical fitness factors increased after 4 weeks. (2) Body weight, skeletal muscle mass, and basal metabolic rate increased, whereas body fat mass and fat percentage decreased. (3) Certain variables of complete blood count showed positive changes, while others did not. Specifically, NK cells (CD56) and cytotoxicity were improved. Conclusions: This study confirmed that performing elbow plank exercises improved all factors of physical fitness and the immunocyte function in an elderly male. Therefore, 20.73 min (9.27 min of rest) of plank exercise is recommended for elderly men to prevent deterioration of physical fitness and immunocyte function while staying at home, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

4.
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry ; 56(1_SUPPL):207-207, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1865845
5.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology ; 79(9):1088, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1768626

ABSTRACT

Background Although the number of patients presenting with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) has drastically reduced in the coronavirus-19 pandemic era, increased mortality was reported. A plausible explanation for increased mortality was suggested as the delay of arrival at the hospital due to patients’ reticence of their symptoms. However, evidence to support the suggested explanation is lacking. Methods From the nationwide prospective registry, we evaluated 6,544 patients with NSTEMI. Study patients were categorized into two groups according to their symptom-to-door (StD) time (<24 h or ≥24 h). The primary outcome was 3-year all-cause mortality, and the secondary outcome was 3-year composite of all-cause mortality, recurrent MI, and hospitalization for heart failure. Results Overall, 27.9% patients were classified into the StD time ≥24 h group. The StD time ≥24 h group had higher all-cause mortality (17.0% vs. 10.5%, p<0.001) and incidence of secondary outcome (23.3% vs. 15.7%, p<0.001) than the StD time <24 h group. In the multivariable analysis, independent predictors of delayed arrival at the hospital were the elderly, female, non-specific symptoms such as atypical chest pain or dyspnea, diabetes, and no use of emergency medical services. Conclusion Delayed arrival (StD time ≥24 h) is associated with an increased risk of 3-year all-cause mortality and composite outcomes in patients with NSTEMI. [Formula presented]

6.
MEDLINE;
Preprint in English | MEDLINE | ID: ppcovidwho-326588

ABSTRACT

Reports of new-onset diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis in individuals with COVID-19 have led to the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is directly cytotoxic to pancreatic islet beta cells. This would require binding and entry of SARS-CoV-2 into host beta cells via cell surface co-expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2, the putative receptor and effector protease, respectively. To define ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression in the human pancreas, we examined six transcriptional datasets from primary human islet cells and assessed protein expression by immunofluorescence in pancreata from donors with and without diabetes. ACE2 and TMPRSS2 transcripts were low or undetectable in pancreatic islet endocrine cells as determined by bulk or single cell RNA sequencing, and neither protein was detected in alpha or beta cells from these donors. Instead, ACE2 protein was expressed in the islet and exocrine tissue microvasculature and also found in a subset of pancreatic ducts, whereas TMPRSS2 protein was restricted to ductal cells. The absence of significant ACE2 and TMPRSS2 co-expression in islet endocrine cells reduces the likelihood that SARS-CoV-2 directly infects pancreatic islet beta cells through these cell entry proteins.

7.
Political Geography ; 95, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1635461

ABSTRACT

This paper argues that labour and community-led advocacy efforts towards a just transition are fundamental to delivering the promises of a Green New Deal (GND) and a just post-carbon world. To this end, an ambitious, far-reaching project was launched by the Labor Network for Sustainability, a non-governmental organization dedicated to bridging the labor and climate movements, in Spring 2020 called the “Just Transition Listening Project'' (JTLP). Over the course of several months, the JTLP interviewed over 100 individuals, including rank-and-file union members, union officials, environmental and climate justice advocates, and Indigenous and community advocates to understand what makes transition “just,” what opportunities exist for a broad coalition to advance a GND-style proposal, and to document the struggles facing working people and communities across the U.S. In doing so, we utilize the tools of political geography to examine the politics of spatiality, networks, and scale as well as the geographical and spatial dimensions of policy and political-economic institutions. We are particularly mindful of two spatial dynamics. First, that transition policies, particularly in a hegemonic country like the USA, have global implications. The industrial transition that took place from the 1970s to the 1990s, for example, bred nativism because it cast other countries as the cause of the problem. Second, critical geographers have pointed out that environmental justice (EJ) has been neoliberalized in the U.S. as a result of its operationalization, spatialization, and administration, starting with the Clinton Administration. Because JT is rising on the national and global agendas, we pay close attention to whether these dynamics that affected EJ are also operating with respect to JT, as well as how they can be contained. This research is particularly timely given the ongoing federal governmental efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19 and provide basic economic and social supports. The process of the JTLP parallels the goals of the GND–intersectional efforts rooted in community knowledge for the development of a people-led GND. This paper details the process of the JTLP and the prospects for intersectional, broad-based movements that are the only way a GND can be realized. © 2022

8.
Asia-Pacific Science Education ; 16(3):1-31, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1595268

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led teachers in the Philippines to rely on technology to provide and support continued education for K-12 students. However, it is not only technology, but also the interactive online learning environments crafted by teachers that impact student science learning. To support teachers to cope with pandemic teaching, the government provided professional development in the form of teacher-training webinars. This study evaluated the webinars using Universal Design for Learning (UDL) principles to understand the impact these professional development sessions had on science teachers' self-efficacy for delivering science instruction during the pandemic. The study found that webinars including UDL design elements improved science teachers' self-efficacy for teaching science and there were no significant differences in teacher perceptions relative to gender or teaching experience. Implications for the use of UDL to design long-term professional development offerings beyond the pandemic are discussed. © Leonardo and Cha, 2021.

9.
Journal of the American Society of Nephrology ; 32:338, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1489446

ABSTRACT

Background: The mortality rate from COVID-19 is remarkably high in elderly patients and those with chronic conditions. Increases in physical and mental stress among patients with chronic conditions, especially end-stage kidney disease, were expected to have occurred in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study reports that the psychosocial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on patients receiving peritoneal dialysis. Methods: During the pandemic, we surveyed the mental health of patients with endstage kidney disease on peritoneal dialysis at a single center. Depression using with BDI scoring was evaluated and then compared in peritoneal dialysis patients between before and the pandemic declaration. We also surveyed patient satisfaction with the self-care services associated with peritoneal dialysis under the pandemic period. Results: One-third of the survey respondents (n=176) were moderately to extremely worried about their physical health being impacted by the pandemic, while 20% moderately to extremely worried about their mental and emotional health being impacted. About half of participant reported feeling that they were unable to handle their personal problems and that things were out of their control. However, most felt that they could retain control over the important things and overcome their difficulties. Despite COVID-19 pandemic, no significant changes in depression scores were apparent between before and during the pandemic. Most participants were satisfied with the in-home selfcare services delivered by either telephone or remote monitoring. Conclusions: Many participants reported that they were afraid of COVID-19, but most patients with PD felt that they could overcome the crisis. The COVID-19 pandemic did not affect the depression of patients receiving peritoneal dialysis.

10.
Journal of Rural and Community Development ; 16(1):68-85, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1306071

ABSTRACT

The impacts of automation and emerging technologies on federal, provincial, and local economies have direct implications for labour markets across the country and require a policy response. Taking into account the impacts of the global COVID-19 pandemic on economies and workforces across the country, this paper reviews the policy choices available to various levels of Canadian governments and businesses in response to the challenges posed by automation. It concludes that reskilling workers, closing economic gaps between rural and urban areas, and preparing for widespread automation are just some of the ways that policymakers, business leaders, and local employers can prepare for, and address, the effects of emerging technologies.

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