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1.
Diabetology ; 3(3):477-493, 2022.
Article in English | MDPI | ID: covidwho-2009972

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 has been associated with a higher risk of death in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, there is a dearth of data regarding the effects of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in these patients. We explored the in-hospital outcomes of patients who presented with COVID-19 and DKA. Methods: A propensity score-matched observational retrospective cohort study was conducted in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in the public healthcare system of New York City from 1 March 2020 to 31 October 2020. Patients were matched, and a subgroup analysis of patients with DKA and COVID-19 and patients without COVID-19 was conducted. Results: 13,333 (16.0%) patients with COVID-19 and 70,005 (84.0%) without COVID-19 were included in the analysis. The in-hospital mortality rate was seven-fold in patients with DKA and COVID-19 compared to patients with COVID-19 and without DKA (80 (36.5%) vs. 11 (5.4%), p < 0.001). Patients with COVID-19 and DKA had a two-fold higher likelihood for in-hospital death (OR: 1.95;95% CI: 1.41–2.70;p < 0.001) after adjusting for multiple variables. Conclusions: DKA was associated with significantly higher in-hospital mortality in hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

2.
J Clin Med ; 11(3)2022 Jan 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650049

ABSTRACT

Severe obesity increases the risk for negative outcomes in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Our objectives were to investigate the effect of BMI on in-hospital outcomes in our New York City Health and Hospitals' ethnically diverse population, further explore this effect by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and timing of admission, and, given the relationship between COVID-19 and hyperinflammation, assess the concentrations of markers of systemic inflammation in different BMI groups. A retrospective study was conducted in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in the public health care system of New York City from 1 March 2020 to 31 October 2020. A total of 8833 patients were included in this analysis (women: 3593, median age: 62 years). The median body mass index (BMI) was 27.9 kg/m2. Both overweight and obesity were independently associated with in-hospital death. The association of overweight and obesity with death appeared to be stronger in men, younger patients, and individuals of Hispanic ethnicity. We did not observe higher concentrations of inflammatory markers in patients with obesity as compared to those without obesity. In conclusion, overweight and obesity were independently associated with in-hospital death. Obesity was not associated with higher concentrations of inflammatory markers.

3.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(9): 1963-1974, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217443

ABSTRACT

It has been demonstrated that obesity is an independent risk factor for worse outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Our objectives were to investigate which classes of obesity are associated with higher in-hospital mortality and to assess the association between obesity and systemic inflammation. This was a retrospective study which included consecutive hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in a tertiary center. Three thousand five hundred thirty patients were included in this analysis (female sex: 1579, median age: 65 years). The median body mass index (BMI) was 28.8 kg/m2. In the overall cohort, a J-shaped association between BMI and in-hospital mortality was depicted. In the subgroup of men, BMI 35-39.9 kg/m2 and BMI ≥40 kg/m2 were found to have significant association with higher in-hospital mortality, while only BMI ≥40 kg/m2 was found significant in the subgroup of women. No significant association between BMI and IL-6 was noted. Obesity classes II and III in men and obesity class III in women were independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. The male population with severe obesity was the one that mainly drove this association. No significant association between BMI and IL-6 was noted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Obesity, Morbid/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Sex Factors , Treatment Outcome
5.
Cureus ; 13(2): e13065, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121296

ABSTRACT

A high incidence of thromboembolic events and coagulation parameter abnormalities are seen in cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Both venous and arterial thrombosis, including arterial thrombosis in unusual sites, have been reported in COVID patients in recent literature. Herein, we report a case of a 67-year-old female patient with non-critical COVID-19 disease with an incidental finding of an asymptomatic splenic infarct. In the absence of a cardio-embolic source, we believe this was an arterial thromboembolic event in the splenic circulation. The duration and modality of anticoagulation of inpatient and ambulatory COVID patients remains a dynamic discussion. Our case adds the evidence of a clinically silent arterial thrombotic event in a non-critical COVID-19 patient which further emphasizes the need to address the strategies for diagnosis and management of thrombo-embolism to prevent potentially fatal complications.

6.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 96(4): 875-886, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014691

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the possible associations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in-hospital mortality and need for invasive mechanical ventilation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective, observational, cohort study was conducted at 2 tertiary academic medical centers in Boston and New York. Eligible participants were hospitalized adult patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 between February 1, 2020, and May 15, 2020. Demographic and clinical characteristics, comorbidities, medications, and disease-related outcomes were extracted from electronic medical records. RESULTS: The final analysis included 144 patients with confirmed COVID-19 (median age, 66 years; 64 [44.4%] male). Overall mortality was 18%, whereas patients with 25(OH)D levels of 30 ng/mL (to convert to nmol/L, multiply by 2.496) and higher had lower rates of mortality compared with those with 25(OH)D levels below 30 ng/mL (9.2% vs 25.3%; P=.02). In the adjusted multivariable analyses, 25(OH)D as a continuous variable was independently significantly associated with lower in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.90 to 0.98; P=.007) and need for invasive mechanical ventilation (odds ratio, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.93 to 0.99; P=.01). Similar data were obtained when 25(OH)D was studied as a continuous variable after logarithm transformation and as a dichotomous (<30 ng/mL vs ≥30 ng/mL) or ordinal variable (quintiles) in the multivariable analyses. CONCLUSION: Among patients admitted with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19, 25(OH)D levels were inversely associated with in-hospital mortality and the need for invasive mechanical ventilation. Further observational studies are needed to confirm these findings, and randomized clinical trials must be conducted to assess the role of vitamin D administration in improving the morbidity and mortality of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiration, Artificial , Vitamin D Deficiency , Vitamin D/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Vitamin D/blood , Vitamin D Deficiency/diagnosis , Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology , Vitamin D Deficiency/immunology , Vitamin D Deficiency/therapy
8.
Hormones (Athens) ; 20(2): 305-314, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893364

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Infectious diseases are more frequent and can be associated with worse outcomes in patients with diabetes. The aim of this study was to systematically review and conduct a meta-analysis of the available observational studies reporting the effect of diabetes on mortality among hospitalized patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The Medline, Embase, Google Scholar, and medRxiv databases were reviewed for identification of eligible studies. A random effects model meta-analysis was used, and I2 was utilized to assess the heterogeneity. In-hospital mortality was defined as the endpoint. Sensitivity, subgroup, and meta-regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: A total of 18,506 patients were included in this meta-analysis (3713 diabetics and 14,793 non-diabetics). Patients with diabetes were associated with a higher risk of death compared with patients without diabetes (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.35-1.96; I2 77.4%). The heterogeneity was high. A study-level meta-regression analysis was performed for all the important covariates, and no significant interactions were found between the covariates and the outcome of mortality. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis shows that that the likelihood of death seems to be higher in diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19 compared with non-diabetic patients. Further studies are needed to assess whether this association is independent or not, as well as to investigate the role of adequate glycemic control prior to infection with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Global Health , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Pandemics , Survival Rate/trends
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